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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991
As I read the March 20 editorial regarding women in management and the "glass ceiling," I was pleased to see that, finally, women should be treated equally. Regardless of the profession, no one should endure the restraints of a "glass ceiling." I'm also confident that David, Shelby, George, Noel, Thomas, Frank, Donald, EuGene, Steven, Lawrence, William and Michael of The Times have never seen the "glass ceilings" and, therefore, can throw rocks. I wonder, would any of these men step down for a woman?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
As the Sochi Olympics kick off, Russia's anti-gay legislation has drawn high-profile protests from athletes, heads of state and the court of public opinion , but perhaps none is as imaginative as "Luge," by the Canadian Institute of Diversity and Inclusion. The video, above, was created to send "a really strong message about the need for equality and the treatment of LGBT people and their allies, particularly at the Olympics,” institute founder Michael Bach said in an interview Thursday with the Los Angeles Times.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | THIA BELL
An Ojai Valley water company is demanding equal treatment with Ventura when the Casitas Municipal Water District adopts a water-allocation plan. "It gets our hackles up to hear Ventura is negotiating for an exemption," said Lindsay Nielson, attorney for the Ventura River County Water District. The company sells water--pumped from the Ventura River basin or bought from Casitas--to about 5,100 Ojai Valley residents.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court's conservative justices signaled Tuesday that they were inclined to uphold California and Michigan ballot measures that forbid state universities from granting "preferential treatment" to applicants based on race. Oral arguments on affirmative action turned into a debate over the meaning of equal treatment under the law, with the justices sounding split along the usual ideological lines. The conservatives, agreeing with Michigan's state lawyers, said removing race as a factor led to equal treatment as required under the 14th Amendment to the Constitution.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the usual labels: Liberal or conservative. Pro-government or anti-government. Activist or restrained. The major rulings of the Supreme Court's 1995-96 term, which ended Monday, can be explained by the justices' allegiance to two constitutional principles: strict equal treatment under law and freedom of speech, broadly defined. Those two principles bring together the justices from across the spectrum, even if they yield rulings that confound the usual analysis.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1990 | ALAN CITRON and MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The final legal barriers to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.'s landmark purchase of MCA Inc. fell on Friday, clearing the way for the completion of the $6.59-billion deal. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real in Los Angeles denied a summary judgment motion sought by MCA shareholder Lawrence Epstein and others. Epstein had charged that a preferred stock payment given to MCA Chairman Lew R.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Denny's restaurants signed a proposed agreement Thursday with the U.S. Department of Justice to settle government claims that the chain has discriminated against black customers. The chain, with nearly 1,500 restaurants nationwide, acknowledged there had been "isolated customer concerns" about some since-abandoned policies, but denied its acts constituted a "pattern of racial discrimination."
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
As the Sochi Olympics kick off, Russia's anti-gay legislation has drawn high-profile protests from athletes, heads of state and the court of public opinion , but perhaps none is as imaginative as "Luge," by the Canadian Institute of Diversity and Inclusion. The video, above, was created to send "a really strong message about the need for equality and the treatment of LGBT people and their allies, particularly at the Olympics,” institute founder Michael Bach said in an interview Thursday with the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
March 28, 1985 | United Press International
The Senate passed a resolution today urging President Reagan to retaliate against Japanese imports unless Japan gives U.S. products greater access to its markets. The non-binding resolution was approved 92 to 0. The debate that preceded the vote was filled with denunciations of Japan's trade policies and warnings that if more equal treatment is not forthcoming Congress will respond with actual retaliatory legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000
Halford Fairchild ("Modern-Day Racism Masks Its Ugly Head," Commentary, Sept. 11) avers that aversive racism manifests itself in opposition to programs and policies that seek to undo white privileges or provide advantages to blacks on the basis of historical discrimination. And that kind of racism is largely unconscious behavior. As we learned from Freud, unconscious behavior is impossible to quantify, and it is sometimes difficult even to determine its existence. Like electricity, we know it's there because we are aware of its effect.
OPINION
December 4, 2012
Re "Affirmative action and the law," Editorial, Nov. 30 Your editorial fails to grasp the intent of affirmative action and equal protection in two respects. You comment favorably on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling 15 years ago that contrasted "equal protection rights against political obstruction to equal treatment" with "equal protection rights against obstructions to preferential treatment. " But you miss the obvious: Preferential treatment is warranted to achieve equal rights for those who otherwise would not have them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A coalition of civil rights and student groups launched a statewide campaign Wednesday to support efforts to overturn California's Proposition 209, which prohibits public universities from considering race and gender in admissions decisions. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is scheduled to hear arguments Feb. 13 in San Francisco from opponents who contend that the measure is unconstitutional. Although the law has been upheld by the California Supreme Court, opponents cite a July opinion by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, which overturned a similar law in Michigan, as new ammunition for their cause.
OPINION
October 14, 2010
In issuing a nationwide injunction against enforcement of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, a federal judge in California may or may not have ended the demeaning practice of expelling service members who are open about their sexuality. It is still possible that a higher court could issue a stay of Judge Virginia A. Phillips' order while appeals are being pursued. Nevertheless, the injunction is a landmark in the quest for equal treatment for gays and lesbians.
HEALTH
September 6, 2010 | By Tammy Worth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, by some estimates, could affect the health coverage of approximately 113 million Americans. Exactly how it will affect them, though, will vary widely. The purpose of the law, which went into effect in July, is to create equal coverage between medical/surgical services and mental healthcare services. The legislation requires group insurance plans to offer the same deductibles, copayments, frequency of treatments and days of outpatient services.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Jessica Guynn
In a case with wide-ranging ramifications for how Americans use the Internet, an appeals court Tuesday struck down a federal rule that required broadband providers to keep their networks open -- even to bandwidth hogs. The decision appears to give telecommunications companies a free hand to limit or block people from watching videos or accessing other online content that they have become increasingly accustomed to downloading with ease. It could also allow Internet service providers to charge a premium to websites for fast delivery of their content.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
In a legal end-run around the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, a federal judge Wednesday ordered compensation for a Los Angeles man denied federal employee benefits for his spouse because they are both men. Brad Levenson, a lawyer with the federal public defender's office, had applied for and been denied healthcare coverage and other benefits for Tony Sears after their July 12, 2008, marriage. Same-sex marriage was legal in California for five months last year, until voters passed Proposition 8, which defines marriage as between one man and one woman.
OPINION
December 4, 2012
Re "Affirmative action and the law," Editorial, Nov. 30 Your editorial fails to grasp the intent of affirmative action and equal protection in two respects. You comment favorably on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling 15 years ago that contrasted "equal protection rights against political obstruction to equal treatment" with "equal protection rights against obstructions to preferential treatment. " But you miss the obvious: Preferential treatment is warranted to achieve equal rights for those who otherwise would not have them.
SPORTS
August 30, 1997
Now that a new college football season is upon us, I thought I could save you quite a bit of column space and review time by having you print this letter every week: Why does your sports page continue to show blatant bias in favor of (UCLA/USC, pick one) over my team (pick the other one)? You might as well just let the sports information office at (UCLA/USC, you get the idea) write your articles. My team has proven by its play to deserve equal treatment, yet you persist in your agenda.
NEWS
August 16, 2009 | Veronika Oleksyn, Oleksyn writes for the Associated Press.
Mike Brennan was getting off a Vienna subway when two undercover police officers pounced on him, mistaking him for a drug dealer. Months later, the 35-year-old black American is still recovering from his injuries -- and waiting for a satisfactory apology. Critics say the incident has highlighted discrimination in a country where Amnesty International says migrants and people of color are more likely to be suspected of crimes than whites and are regularly denied their right to equal treatment by the police and judicial system.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2005 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Monday's state Supreme Court ruling broadening the rights of registered domestic partners in California will have little effect on most businesses, experts said Tuesday. The unanimous decision held that businesses providing special services, discounts or other privileges to married couples must do the same for same-sex couples registered with the state as domestic partners.
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