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Equilibrium

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OPINION
December 10, 2005
It is said that we have an illegal immigration problem. Foreigners come here to find jobs. U.S. employers that need willing workers hire them. Where's the problem? PETER MYERS Palos Verdes Peninsula
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SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
When Josh Hamilton left after six innings of the Angels' 11-4 loss to the Kansas City Royals on Monday, it was not because of the lopsided score. Instead, Angels Manager Mike Scioscia said, Hamilton was "a little lightheaded. " Said Hamilton: "I was not lightheaded. I was just sick. " Hamilton said he has tried to play through an illness for 10 days to two weeks. He said he started taking antibiotics Saturday for what he suspects is a respiratory infection. "The equilibrium wasn't quite where it needed to be," he said.
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SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
When Josh Hamilton left after six innings of the Angels' 11-4 loss to the Kansas City Royals on Monday, it was not because of the lopsided score. Instead, Angels Manager Mike Scioscia said, Hamilton was "a little lightheaded. " Said Hamilton: "I was not lightheaded. I was just sick. " Hamilton said he has tried to play through an illness for 10 days to two weeks. He said he started taking antibiotics Saturday for what he suspects is a respiratory infection. "The equilibrium wasn't quite where it needed to be," he said.
HEALTH
January 12, 2013 | Hilary MacGregor
When my editor assigned me a story on balance, I wondered if it was some sort of sick joke. I am a full-time working mother of two who is running so hard my head spins for an hour every night in the dark making compulsive lists of what I have to do for job, kids, husband, school, soccer, piano, life. On weekends, I run to exhaustion to quiet my monkey mind. People talk to me about balance and I laugh. I know I am not alone. Life is getting faster, and people are expected to do more and more at higher and higher speeds.
OPINION
July 2, 2010 | By Michael Shermer
Saturday is the beginning of the Tour de France, one of the world's premier sporting events. This year's race may be one of the most, if not the most, epic in its 97-year history, with no fewer than a dozen contenders for the podium's top spot, including the legendary Lance Armstrong and his chief rival and last year's winner, Alberto Contador. Unfortunately, the pall of doping hangs over the event, especially since the disgraced 2006 winner, Floyd Landis, recently accused Armstrong and several other riders in this year's race of systematic doping in previous years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1988
I believe Williams is unduly pessimistic about the role the U.S. will play in the Pacific. The interdependence of all nations requires initiatives and policies that will maintain an economic equilibrium--an equilibrium which dampens the boom and bust cycles of the past and accommodates the economic and social aspirations of people everywhere. Success in achieving this goal is dependent not on military force or presence, but on our ability to understand and work within the delicate web of international relations which link all nations.
OPINION
February 15, 2002
What a great juxtaposition of articles on your Feb. 13 Commentary page. James Pinkerton explains how deregulated electricity, at its best, saves the average household $10 a month--while minimizing the billions that it costs when deregulation is at its worst ("Enron Is but a Pebble in the Wave"). Bart Kosko, on the other hand, explains the Nobel Prize-winning Nash equilibrium, showing "how selfish competitors should act in relation to those whom they compete against" ("How Many Blonds Mess Up a Nash Equilibrium?"
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mysterious poisonings at a diaper manufacturer have left one worker dead and sickened 19 others, a police spokesman said Monday. The police were investigating all possible causes of the poisonings Sunday at the Hugla paper factory in Afula, in northern Israel, including the possibility they were the result of sabotage by Arab extremists, said northern district police spokesman Maj. Gideon Arbel. Police were checking the water and food served at the factory, he said. Dr. Ehud Kantros, deputy director of the Afula Valley Hospital, said the workers were admitted complaining of severe stomach cramps, nausea, headaches and loss of equilibrium about two hours after eating lunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | DUANE T. PREIMSBERGER is chief of detectives for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. He told The Times: and
We're hearing these days that the way to restore equilibrium to our violent society is to put guns into the hands of good guys and send then out into the streets as auxiliary police officers. I'm not certain that the law-abiding citizens in any American big city want to return to a social climate that smacks of the boom towns of the Old West, when gunfire often ended disputes between good and bad guys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991
In response to your editorial "Identifying an Alleged Victim of Rape" (April 19): When it comes to victims of rape, we Americans have a double standard. Whether defined as a crime of sex or violence, rape is definitely an act of robbery--a robbery of a woman's sense of self. The woman's alleged sexual history and possible indiscretions are dragged out into the public arena. When she is not the perfect Victorian virgin, the media and/or courts seek to show that somehow she tempted the man. This is pure hogwash.
OPINION
September 22, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Only six weeks to go in the presidential campaign, and the public opinion surveys have developed a case of the jitters. Last week, one respected poll reported that President Obama had opened an eight-point lead over Mitt Romney, but another reported that the race was dead even. Other surveys were scattered in between. What's a poor voter supposed to believe? I consulted three smart pollsters - one Democrat, one Republican, one nonpartisan - and they all offered the same advice: Calm down.
OPINION
July 2, 2010 | By Michael Shermer
Saturday is the beginning of the Tour de France, one of the world's premier sporting events. This year's race may be one of the most, if not the most, epic in its 97-year history, with no fewer than a dozen contenders for the podium's top spot, including the legendary Lance Armstrong and his chief rival and last year's winner, Alberto Contador. Unfortunately, the pall of doping hangs over the event, especially since the disgraced 2006 winner, Floyd Landis, recently accused Armstrong and several other riders in this year's race of systematic doping in previous years.
BOOKS
June 24, 2007 | Jesse Cohen, Jesse Cohen is the series editor of "The Best American Science Writing."
DESPITE what M. Night Shyamalan says, the sixth sense has nothing to do with seeing dead people. According to veteran journalist Scott McCredie's sporadically fascinating new book, the sixth sense is actually our sense of balance -- easy to take for granted, because it does not seem like a sense at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
ROWS of poinsettias are rising along the zocalo, where police and protesters recently brawled. Fresh coats of paint are being slapped on buildings to cover up angry graffiti. Even though the barricades have been removed and the blood has been mopped from the streets, this colonial-era city is struggling to recover from a violent spasm that scarred its buildings, traumatized its citizens and left as many as a dozen people dead over a seven-month span.
OPINION
December 10, 2005
It is said that we have an illegal immigration problem. Foreigners come here to find jobs. U.S. employers that need willing workers hire them. Where's the problem? PETER MYERS Palos Verdes Peninsula
OPINION
July 31, 2004
Re "Mining the Imagination for New Energy," Opinion, July 25: Alan Weisman thoughtfully highlights one of the major concerns facing world civilization over the next century: our rapidly increasing world population with its concomitant, exponentially increasing use of energy, coupled with a greatly diminished availability of oil, the lifeblood of our civilization. Weisman mentions a variety of imaginative "long shot" possible solutions, none of which appear very practical, but does not consider the obvious one -- to decrease the world population to the point where it will be in equilibrium with renewable energy sources: solar energy, wind, biomass, geothermal energy and hydroelectric.
OPINION
July 31, 2004
Re "Mining the Imagination for New Energy," Opinion, July 25: Alan Weisman thoughtfully highlights one of the major concerns facing world civilization over the next century: our rapidly increasing world population with its concomitant, exponentially increasing use of energy, coupled with a greatly diminished availability of oil, the lifeblood of our civilization. Weisman mentions a variety of imaginative "long shot" possible solutions, none of which appear very practical, but does not consider the obvious one -- to decrease the world population to the point where it will be in equilibrium with renewable energy sources: solar energy, wind, biomass, geothermal energy and hydroelectric.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
OPINION
May 22, 2004
In many countries, the size of the population exceeds the resources to sustain it, and workers in these poverty-stricken nations gladly work for a fraction of their U.S. counterparts. Will the United States be exporting jobs and importing people until the standard of living between the U.S. and the Third World is equalized? Ralph Meyer Santa Monica
BUSINESS
July 1, 2002 | Times Staff and Reuters
Wall Street opens this week wondering if Friday's heavy trading volume in stocks, coinciding with the nearly flat performances of major indexes, suggests the scandal-rocked market has reached some semblance of equilibrium in the near term. Stocks rallied for much of the session Friday amid soaring volume, as investors made bets, or closed out bets, on the last day of the second quarter. The New York Stock Exchange recorded its fifth-heaviest trading day, as more than 2.
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