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BUSINESS
July 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rescues of the last large problem banks in Texas could signal new life for the state's limping economy, financial analysts said Friday after the bailouts of banks based in San Antonio and Ft. Worth. Federal regulators pledged $250 million to National Bancshares Corp. of Texas in San Antonio less than 24 hours after bailing out Texas American Bancshares Inc. in Ft. Worth with $900 million. Equimark Corp.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rescues of the last large problem banks in Texas could signal new life for the state's limping economy, financial analysts said Friday after the bailouts of banks based in San Antonio and Ft. Worth. Federal regulators pledged $250 million to National Bancshares Corp. of Texas in San Antonio less than 24 hours after bailing out Texas American Bancshares Inc. in Ft. Worth with $900 million. Equimark Corp.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators today rescued the last of the big problem banks in the state, pledging $250 million to National Bancshares Corp. of Texas less than 24 hours after bailing out Texas American Bancshares Inc. with $900 million. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said Equimark Corp. of Pittsburgh will take over the San Antonio-based holding company, which owns 12 banks with assets of $2.3 billion and deposits of $2.2 billion. James H. McLaughlin, president of Equibank, which has $3.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren E. Buffett, a savvy stock picker known for investing in undervalued companies with strong fundamentals, has amassed a 9.8% stake in Wells Fargo & Co. The big San Francisco-based banking company, which has seen its stock battered in recent months because of concerns over real estate loans, on Wednesday expressed delight at having Buffett as its biggest shareholder, with 5.03 million shares now worth $250 million. "This is good news indeed," Wells Chairman Carl E.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
Executive pay, not South Africa or the environment, is expected to dominate the agenda of emotional issues during the 1992 shareholder annual meeting season, which begins next month. A movement against the gluttonous compensation deals that many top corporate officers award themselves has been spurred by federal regulators, who are making it easier for shareholders to understand, review and speak up about the financial rewards management receives.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | TOM PETRUNO
This is what will not happen, now that the average shareholder can voice an opinion on the pay levels of corporate executives: * Every chief executive's salary will be slashed 80%, just on principle--because people are mad as hell and they don't want CEOs raking it in anymore. * Companies no longer will be able to attract talented executives, so American business will begin a long and painful slide, with the final result that . . . * . . .
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