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November 6, 1994 | Rick Du Brow, Rick Du Brow is The Times' television writer
It's an eye-catching set for a TV show, a large and compelling maze of hospital rooms that takes up most of Stage 11 at Warner Bros. studios in Burbank. There, at the moment, a sprawling, surprising major new hit--the medical series "ER"--is being crafted. The initials stand for emergency room , and the NBC drama's trademark is a frenetic pace as blurry swarms of people and stories crisscross in a program that took off like a shot in the ratings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Working at County General Hospital, where "ER" takes place, could be hazardous to your health Death by whirlybird: Dr. Robert Romano crushed by falling copter. Gang fight: Dr. Abby Lockhart kidnapped by gang. Getting a grip: Vengeful father crushes Dr. Luka Kovac's operating hand in vise. Strapped up: Kovac injected with paralyzing drug while bound to gurney. Father anger: Nurse Samantha Taggart raped by her son's father. Auto accident: Dr. Ray Barnett hit by truck, loses both legs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1998 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Our triplets were three weeks old when "ER" called. You can't miss them: Collectively they portray the baby delivered near the end of Thursday's show by emergency room regulars played by George Clooney and Julianna Margulies. That was momentous enough for us, but it's also the series' 100th episode. We didn't know any of this at the time; neither my wife, Kathleen, nor I had ever even seen "ER." Neither had we sought out Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Greg Braxton and Maria Elena Fernandez
The patients at "ER's" County General Hospital weren't the only ones receiving a little TLC. In between the endless paperwork and bloody surgeries, young doctors and nurses in love -- and sometimes not -- administered a crash cart full of sexual healing to their co-workers. But still there is debate over which doctor had the most hospital hookups -- John Carter (Noah Wyle) or Neela Rasgotra (Parminder Nagra). If the bed-hopper title is based solely on a raw body count, Carter wins, pants down.
HEALTH
May 21, 2007 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
ER, NBC, Thursday, May 10, 10 p.m., "Sea Change." The premise: A physics professor has collapsed at a conference and is brought to the ER, where she complains of abdominal pain and weakness. She has low blood pressure and a high fever. Dr. Greg Pratt ( Mekhi Phifer) thinks she may be suffering from a virus, but — while observing her for further signs — he orders blood tests looking for bacteria as a precaution. When those tests show the presence of Gram-positive cocci bacteria, suggesting a dangerous staph or strep infection, Pratt tries to obtain the powerful antibiotic ceftriaxone from the pharmacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chicago Hope" and "ER" are in a space jam. Producers of CBS' "Chicago Hope," who have been steadily building a story line that will put former chief of surgery Kate Austin (Christine Lahti) into space as a shuttle payload specialist by the end of the season, are seeing stars over a similar plot line that has suddenly popped up on NBC's "ER."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
I remember the moment when I realized film could make horror beautiful and thus even more horrifying ("Apocalypse Now") or a stage actor could be so mesmerizing you forget he's on a stage (Derek Jacobi in "Breaking the Code"). But not like I remember the moment I understood how powerful and long-lasting an hour of television could be.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Noah Wyle, the only leading player from the original "ER" cast to have stayed with the show, will leave the medical drama at the end of this season. But he won't disappear entirely: NBC says the actor has committed to returning for four episodes in each of the next two seasons. Wyle, who plays Dr. John Carter, will bid farewell to colleagues at the Chicago hospital in the season finale, scheduled for broadcast May 19.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Viewers of NBC's drama "ER" appear to be taking some of the story lines to heart. Analyzing data from three surveys, both mail- and Web-based, USC researchers found that some viewers decided to mend unhealthful ways after watching three specific episodes of "ER" that aired in spring 2004. The episodes included a story about an African American teen, struggling with obesity and hypertension, who was advised to eat more vegetables and get more exercise. Published in the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The loss of "Seinfeld" will have an "enormous impact" on prime time, and competing networks will likely add to NBC's woes by exploring how to steal its top-rated drama "ER," the Fox network's programming chief said Friday. Addressing a group of TV critics in Pasadena, Fox Entertainment Group President Peter Roth avoided specifics regarding "ER"--which will be in play for next season if NBC can't come to a deal with production company Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009
"In football they say, 'Don't leave anything on the floor.' I don't feel we've left anything." -- David Zabel (Writer, executive producer, Seasons 8-15, wrote 43 episodes) -- "I would be sadder if it was limping toward the finish. But it's nice that it will have its time and place and it's so highly regarded." -- Rod Holcomb (Director, pilot and series finale) -- "It's difficult to invest as much energy, time and passion and then not be on it but still be accountable to it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Denise Martin
Fifteen years after he first donned that freshly pressed doctor's coat, Noah Wyle is revealing an "ER" secret: There are only about 12 things you can do to a patient in the emergency room before shipping them elsewhere in a hospital. "You've got your intubation, your thoracotomy, your chest tube, your central line . . . once you have those memorized, you can do anything," he said. Well, more or less.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
It was the last day that many of the doctors, nurses and other hospital favorites would work on an "ER" scene together. The routine shift change at the nurse's station, part of Thursday's two-hour finale that will bring the NBC show to a close after 15 seasons, called for 150 actors, crew members and extras and bustled with the energy that fans have loved over the years. Scott Grimes sang and cracked jokes, sometimes flubbing his lines to the dismay (or was it amusement?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
I remember the moment when I realized film could make horror beautiful and thus even more horrifying ("Apocalypse Now") or a stage actor could be so mesmerizing you forget he's on a stage (Derek Jacobi in "Breaking the Code"). But not like I remember the moment I understood how powerful and long-lasting an hour of television could be.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Kate Aurthur
On the night of Feb. 10, 2000 -- in the pre-spoiler era, when it was possible to watch an episode of television and be wholly surprised -- "ER" viewers found themselves stunned/petrified by its final two minutes. The scene: During a Valentine's Day party in the ER, an annoyed Carter (Noah Wyle) goes looking for his put-upon medical student, Lucy (Kellie Martin), to reprimand her one more time for the day.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Viewers of NBC's drama "ER" appear to be taking some of the story lines to heart. Analyzing data from three surveys, both mail- and Web-based, USC researchers found that some viewers decided to mend unhealthful ways after watching three specific episodes of "ER" that aired in spring 2004. The episodes included a story about an African American teen, struggling with obesity and hypertension, who was advised to eat more vegetables and get more exercise. Published in the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Alex Kingston says she's being axed from "ER" for being too old. The British actress, who plays Dr. Elizabeth Corday on the long-running NBC medical drama, said she was told recently that after seven years on the show, her contract would not be renewed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2004 | Susan King
British actress Alex Kingston, 41, says her quotes in the BBC's Radio Times listings magazine interview that she was axed from the NBC series "ER" because she was too old were taken out of context. In a statement issued by Kingston on Tuesday she said: "I would like to clarify my feelings regarding my departure from 'ER.' Statements from an interview I recently gave were spoken tongue in cheek ....
HEALTH
May 21, 2007 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
ER, NBC, Thursday, May 10, 10 p.m., "Sea Change." The premise: A physics professor has collapsed at a conference and is brought to the ER, where she complains of abdominal pain and weakness. She has low blood pressure and a high fever. Dr. Greg Pratt (Mekhi Phifer) thinks she may be suffering from a virus, but -- while observing her for further signs -- he orders blood tests looking for bacteria as a precaution.
HEALTH
May 21, 2007 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
ER, NBC, Thursday, May 10, 10 p.m., "Sea Change." The premise: A physics professor has collapsed at a conference and is brought to the ER, where she complains of abdominal pain and weakness. She has low blood pressure and a high fever. Dr. Greg Pratt ( Mekhi Phifer) thinks she may be suffering from a virus, but — while observing her for further signs — he orders blood tests looking for bacteria as a precaution. When those tests show the presence of Gram-positive cocci bacteria, suggesting a dangerous staph or strep infection, Pratt tries to obtain the powerful antibiotic ceftriaxone from the pharmacy.
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