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November 6, 1994 | Rick Du Brow, Rick Du Brow is The Times' television writer
It's an eye-catching set for a TV show, a large and compelling maze of hospital rooms that takes up most of Stage 11 at Warner Bros. studios in Burbank. There, at the moment, a sprawling, surprising major new hit--the medical series "ER"--is being crafted. The initials stand for emergency room , and the NBC drama's trademark is a frenetic pace as blurry swarms of people and stories crisscross in a program that took off like a shot in the ratings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Greg Braxton and Maria Elena Fernandez
The patients at "ER's" County General Hospital weren't the only ones receiving a little TLC. In between the endless paperwork and bloody surgeries, young doctors and nurses in love -- and sometimes not -- administered a crash cart full of sexual healing to their co-workers. But still there is debate over which doctor had the most hospital hookups -- John Carter (Noah Wyle) or Neela Rasgotra (Parminder Nagra). If the bed-hopper title is based solely on a raw body count, Carter wins, pants down.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chicago Hope" and "ER" are in a space jam. Producers of CBS' "Chicago Hope," who have been steadily building a story line that will put former chief of surgery Kate Austin (Christine Lahti) into space as a shuttle payload specialist by the end of the season, are seeing stars over a similar plot line that has suddenly popped up on NBC's "ER."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009
"In football they say, 'Don't leave anything on the floor.' I don't feel we've left anything." -- David Zabel (Writer, executive producer, Seasons 8-15, wrote 43 episodes) -- "I would be sadder if it was limping toward the finish. But it's nice that it will have its time and place and it's so highly regarded." -- Rod Holcomb (Director, pilot and series finale) -- "It's difficult to invest as much energy, time and passion and then not be on it but still be accountable to it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Noah Wyle, the only leading player from the original "ER" cast to have stayed with the show, will leave the medical drama at the end of this season. But he won't disappear entirely: NBC says the actor has committed to returning for four episodes in each of the next two seasons. Wyle, who plays Dr. John Carter, will bid farewell to colleagues at the Chicago hospital in the season finale, scheduled for broadcast May 19.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Viewers of NBC's drama "ER" appear to be taking some of the story lines to heart. Analyzing data from three surveys, both mail- and Web-based, USC researchers found that some viewers decided to mend unhealthful ways after watching three specific episodes of "ER" that aired in spring 2004. The episodes included a story about an African American teen, struggling with obesity and hypertension, who was advised to eat more vegetables and get more exercise. Published in the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The loss of "Seinfeld" will have an "enormous impact" on prime time, and competing networks will likely add to NBC's woes by exploring how to steal its top-rated drama "ER," the Fox network's programming chief said Friday. Addressing a group of TV critics in Pasadena, Fox Entertainment Group President Peter Roth avoided specifics regarding "ER"--which will be in play for next season if NBC can't come to a deal with production company Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Alex Kingston says she's being axed from "ER" for being too old. The British actress, who plays Dr. Elizabeth Corday on the long-running NBC medical drama, said she was told recently that after seven years on the show, her contract would not be renewed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2004 | Susan King
British actress Alex Kingston, 41, says her quotes in the BBC's Radio Times listings magazine interview that she was axed from the NBC series "ER" because she was too old were taken out of context. In a statement issued by Kingston on Tuesday she said: "I would like to clarify my feelings regarding my departure from 'ER.' Statements from an interview I recently gave were spoken tongue in cheek ....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Noah Wyle, the last continuous on-air link to the NBC medical drama "ER's" freshman season in 1994, seems headed for the doctor's retirement home. Wyle, who plays Dr. John Carter, told E! Entertainment Television on Thursday that he planned to leave the show at the end of this season, when his contract expires. "I've just got other stuff going in my life right now," Wyle said.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Viewers of NBC's drama "ER" appear to be taking some of the story lines to heart. Analyzing data from three surveys, both mail- and Web-based, USC researchers found that some viewers decided to mend unhealthful ways after watching three specific episodes of "ER" that aired in spring 2004. The episodes included a story about an African American teen, struggling with obesity and hypertension, who was advised to eat more vegetables and get more exercise. Published in the Sept.
HEALTH
December 4, 2006 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"ER": "Scoop and Run," Nov. 23. The premise: ER resident Dr. Abby Lockhart (Maura Tierney) accompanies the crew of a medical evacuation helicopter to a local community hospital, where an 88-year-old woman is having a heart attack. Abby's hospital is a Level One Trauma Center with a cardiac catheterization lab, which the other hospital lacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2005 | Meghan Daum, Special to The Times
ON a chilly Wednesday night in late April, Noah Wyle stood before a mirror on a Warner Bros. soundstage and spoke what are among his last lines as Dr. John Carter, the "ER" physician he's played since the show began over a decade ago. "It's been 11 years," he said. "And I feel like I pretty much grew up with all of you guys." It's a sentiment that resonates beyond the script for Wyle's last episode, which airs Thursday on NBC.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Noah Wyle, the only leading player from the original "ER" cast to have stayed with the show, will leave the medical drama at the end of this season. But he won't disappear entirely: NBC says the actor has committed to returning for four episodes in each of the next two seasons. Wyle, who plays Dr. John Carter, will bid farewell to colleagues at the Chicago hospital in the season finale, scheduled for broadcast May 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005
Actress Cynthia Nixon, of "Sex and the City" fame, has signed on to guest star on ER. The episode will air Feb. 17 at 10 p.m. on NBC. She plays a soccer mom who suffers a stroke and is rushed to the emergency room. Oscar winner Sissy Spacek has also signed on to guest star on the show, in an episode that will air Feb. 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Noah Wyle, the last continuous on-air link to the NBC medical drama "ER's" freshman season in 1994, seems headed for the doctor's retirement home. Wyle, who plays Dr. John Carter, told E! Entertainment Television on Thursday that he planned to leave the show at the end of this season, when his contract expires. "I've just got other stuff going in my life right now," Wyle said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1995 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, nobody knew the names of the stars of NBC's "ER." This year, most people still don't know their names, but everybody knows their faces. Instead of inching ahead of "Chicago Hope," "ER" shot out of the box faster than any new show since "Charlie's Angels" and finished the season right behind top-rated "Seinfeld." "ER" took "Dr. Kildare," jolted it with the electricity of MTV and came up with something new, strange and wildly successful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1997
The Labor Day L.A. Foundation is hosting a fund-raising dinner tonight at the Regent Beverly Wilshire honoring the producers of the television series "E.R." Foundation President Ronald Palmieri called the black-tie dinner the centerpiece of a series of weekend events expected to raise $250,000 for AIDS-related charities. The foundation has raised $1.5 million in 10 years and given grants to local organizations that assist people with AIDS or HIV, he said. Four "E.R."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2004 | Susan King
British actress Alex Kingston, 41, says her quotes in the BBC's Radio Times listings magazine interview that she was axed from the NBC series "ER" because she was too old were taken out of context. In a statement issued by Kingston on Tuesday she said: "I would like to clarify my feelings regarding my departure from 'ER.' Statements from an interview I recently gave were spoken tongue in cheek ....
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Alex Kingston says she's being axed from "ER" for being too old. The British actress, who plays Dr. Elizabeth Corday on the long-running NBC medical drama, said she was told recently that after seven years on the show, her contract would not be renewed.
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