Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEric Andersen
IN THE NEWS

Eric Andersen

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1989 | Mike Boehm
For more than 25 years now, Eric Andersen has been following the itinerant ideal that first sprang out at him from the pages of Beat Generation writers. It has not made for the steadiest of career paths, but every so often Andersen's meandering brings him back into the current of the music industry's mainstream. In the mid-'60s, Andersen arrived in New York's Greenwich Village in time to make an impression while its folk music scene was still booming.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The short and tragic life of Phil Ochs is as involving as the music he wrote and played, and that is saying a great deal. If you remember the 1960s, you more than likely remember the singer-songwriter who composed hundreds of songs, many of them, as can be heard on the strong and forceful documentary "Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune," beautiful and melodic as well as pointedly political. It was Ochs who wrote "I Ain't Marching Anymore," sometimes called the anthem of the anti-Vietnam War movement.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Eric Andersen was part of the same Greenwich Village folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan and Joan Baez in the early 1960s. In the ensuing years, many of his contemporaries have gone on to bigger and better things. Andersen, on the other hand, seems caught in a time warp.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
When Rick Danko puts his singularly emotive voice on a record, it's something of an occasion. He sang a trove of great songs as a member of the Band (there are no more heartfelt performances in the annals of rock than Danko singing "It Makes No Difference" or "The Unfaithful Servant") and in 1977 released a strong, promising album of his own. But since then, as far as recordings are concerned, little if anything has been heard from him, despite his fairly active round of live dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1985 | STEVE POND
You can't really say Eric Andersen's 20-year career is on an upswing. In the '60s, Andersen was in the thick of the East Coast folk boom. In the '70s he made the unjustly neglected "Blue River" LP, then slowly faded from sight, and now he's releasing mail-order records on his own label.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The short and tragic life of Phil Ochs is as involving as the music he wrote and played, and that is saying a great deal. If you remember the 1960s, you more than likely remember the singer-songwriter who composed hundreds of songs, many of them, as can be heard on the strong and forceful documentary "Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune," beautiful and melodic as well as pointedly political. It was Ochs who wrote "I Ain't Marching Anymore," sometimes called the anthem of the anti-Vietnam War movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Eric Andersen advised all fellow singer/songwriter types at McCabe's on Friday to follow his lead and let recordings age for 18 years prior to public consumption. "It's like wine, y'know," he said, "as long as you don't get hit by a heavy frost or something."
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
When Rick Danko puts his singularly emotive voice on a record, it's something of an occasion. He sang a trove of great songs as a member of the Band (there are no more heartfelt performances in the annals of rock than Danko singing "It Makes No Difference" or "The Unfaithful Servant") and in 1977 released a strong, promising album of his own. But since then, as far as recordings are concerned, little if anything has been heard from him, despite his fairly active round of live dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988
Nina J. Easton's article on Don Johnson may best be described as a hatchet job ("From 'Vice' to 'Sweet Hearts,' " Sept. 21). As a cameraman, I recently had the pleasure of working with Don on the film "Dead Bang." He proved to be affable, considerate and constructive with the camera crew. As for Johnson's criticism of photographer Iris Schneider's lens choice and camera angles, having seen the photograph that accompanied Calendar's article, I can say that his concerns were well warranted!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
A reunited Black Sabbath, above, will be at the Great Western Forum on Jan. 5. Tickets go on sale Saturday. . . . Tickets go on sale Sunday for 'N Sync, April 16 at the Forum. . . . Culture Club has added a Jan. 6 date at the Universal Amphitheatre. Tickets go on sale Saturday. . . . Tickets will be available Monday for six shows at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza: Joan Baez on Feb. 20; B.B. King on Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Eric Andersen advised all fellow singer/songwriter types at McCabe's on Friday to follow his lead and let recordings age for 18 years prior to public consumption. "It's like wine, y'know," he said, "as long as you don't get hit by a heavy frost or something."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1989 | Mike Boehm
For more than 25 years now, Eric Andersen has been following the itinerant ideal that first sprang out at him from the pages of Beat Generation writers. It has not made for the steadiest of career paths, but every so often Andersen's meandering brings him back into the current of the music industry's mainstream. In the mid-'60s, Andersen arrived in New York's Greenwich Village in time to make an impression while its folk music scene was still booming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Eric Andersen was part of the same Greenwich Village folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan and Joan Baez in the early 1960s. In the ensuing years, many of his contemporaries have gone on to bigger and better things. Andersen, on the other hand, seems caught in a time warp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1985 | STEVE POND
You can't really say Eric Andersen's 20-year career is on an upswing. In the '60s, Andersen was in the thick of the East Coast folk boom. In the '70s he made the unjustly neglected "Blue River" LP, then slowly faded from sight, and now he's releasing mail-order records on his own label.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Lease problems will soon put the Old Time Cafe out of business, eight years after the Greenwich Village-style coffeehouse opened. As of Jan. 31, touring folk acts like Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Eric Andersen and John McCutcheon will no longer have a place to play when passing through San Diego. Pearl Wolfe, who owns the cafe with her husband, Bill Goldsmith, said the closure is a mixed blessing. "After eight years of working seven days a week, it's nice to be normal people for a change," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Are the Old Time Cafe's days as San Diego's center for live folk music numbered? The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind. "Everybody's days are numbered," said Bill Goldsmith, who with his wife, Pearl Wolfe, has operated the tiny Leucadia coffeehouse for more than seven years. "But in our case, we just don't know exactly what that number is."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|