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Eric Crumpton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered activist landlord Eric Crumpton to pay $2,000 to four of 10 neighbors who sued him for failing to keep gang members from overrunning a building he owns in Hollywood. In a small claims court appeal trial that ended Thursday, Judge Kathryn Doi Todd found Crumpton liable for refusing to ward off gang members who gathered at his apartment building in the 1600 block of Winona Boulevard, one block west of Normandie Ave.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered activist landlord Eric Crumpton to pay $2,000 to four of 10 neighbors who sued him for failing to keep gang members from overrunning a building he owns in Hollywood. In a small claims court appeal trial that ended Thursday, Judge Kathryn Doi Todd found Crumpton liable for refusing to ward off gang members who gathered at his apartment building in the 1600 block of Winona Boulevard, one block west of Normandie Ave.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1990 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Jungle," a community of apartments west of Crenshaw Boulevard, landlord Eric Crumpton started a group to rout drug pushers from the area. But residents of a once-quiet Hollywood street blame Crumpton for gang problems in a building he owns there, and they are wielding a novel weapon in their fight against crime: They are holding Crumpton responsible in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activist landlord Eric Crumpton went to Los Angeles Superior Court Thursday to appeal a Small Claims Court award of $20,000 to 10 neighbors of a building he owns in Hollywood. The landlord's lawyer told Judge Kathryn Doi Todd that Crumpton's building is not the area's "hub of gang activity," as neighbors allege, and that Crumpton should not be singled out for failing to curb criminal activity that is rife throughout the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activist landlord Eric Crumpton went to Los Angeles Superior Court Thursday to appeal a Small Claims Court award of $20,000 to 10 neighbors of a building he owns in Hollywood. The landlord's lawyer told Judge Kathryn Doi Todd that Crumpton's building is not the area's "hub of gang activity," as neighbors allege, and that Crumpton should not be singled out for failing to curb criminal activity that is rife throughout the city.
REAL ESTATE
December 15, 1985
As the president of the Crenshaw Apartment Improvement Program, I would like to take this opportunity to thank Ruth Ryon for the very fine article (Dec. 1) on the apartment community infamously known as "The Jungle." This article has had a provocative impact on the community, and has served as a source of motivation to many who now want to get involved. Again, Ruth, thank you for your very fair and well-balanced reporting, and hopefully your efforts in cleaning up "The Jungle" will serve to make you proud as well.
NEWS
February 18, 1988
Los Angeles Councilwoman Ruth Galanter has established a 15-member community planning board to advise her on development issues in the Baldwin Hills and Crenshaw communities. The planning board is the first established by the councilwoman since she took office last year. She plans similar boards to cover the Westchester, Mar Vista and Venice communities in her 6th District.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | JOHN MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter announced the formation of a Crenshaw-area group to coordinate community efforts to restore areas devastated in the recent riots. The Rebuild Crenshaw Committee, composed of community-based businesses and organizations, will lobby to bring needed resources into the area, said Galanter, who spoke Thursday at a news conference in front of the charred remains of a Wherehouse record store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1988 | JOHN MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
A recent decision by the Los Angeles City Council has left Booker T. Burgess and some of his neighbors asking the Shakespearean question, "What's in a name?" Burgess, 72, says that for more than five years he has felt trapped in the place known as "The Jungle," a tough, crime-ridden community with a reputation as a haven for violent, drug-dealing street gangs. "It's been bad, it's not a good place for a senior citizen like me," Burgess said.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | JOHN MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
A recent decision by the Los Angeles City Council has left Booker T. Burgess and some of his neighbors asking the Shakespearean question, "What's in a name?" For more than five years, Burgess, 72, says he has felt trapped in a place named The Jungle, a tough, crime-ridden community with a reputation as a haven for violent, drug-dealing street gangs. "It's been bad, it's not a good place for a senior citizen like me," Burgess said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1990 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Jungle," a community of apartments west of Crenshaw Boulevard, landlord Eric Crumpton started a group to rout drug pushers from the area. But residents of a once-quiet Hollywood street blame Crumpton for gang problems in a building he owns there, and they are wielding a novel weapon in their fight against crime: They are holding Crumpton responsible in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1988 | Edmund Newton, Newton is a Times staff writer .
Eric Crumpton is what you call an activist landlord. When drugs and gangs threaten your investment, you don't just sit in an office somewhere, collecting rent, he says. Get out there and change things. Sure, there are problems in the Jungle, the Crenshaw-area community where he owns eight buildings and leads a group of more than 80 landlords and tenants. "But we're actively trying to do something about them."
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
'We are going to rid this community of an eyesore that has plagued its spirit and reputation.' --Ruth Galanter, city councilwoman For years, Veniore Robinson, his wife, Ruth, and their two children have been the only residents in a building considered by many, in the crime-ridden Crenshaw apartment area known as "the Jungle," to be an example of governmental neglect and indifference. The 24-unit building on Gibraltar Avenue is owned by the Los Angeles Housing Authority.
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