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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Mickey Rose was a childhood friend of Woody Allen, sharing his pal's fervent enthusiasms for baseball, jazz and movies and later becoming the young filmmaker's writing partner for his early, madcap comedies "Bananas" and "Take the Money and Run. " Rose, who went on to become a television comedy writer, penning jokes and sketches for Johnny Carson, Sid Caesar and other top comedians and shows of his era, died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Mickey Rose was a childhood friend of Woody Allen, sharing his pal's fervent enthusiasms for baseball, jazz and movies and later becoming the young filmmaker's writing partner for his early, madcap comedies "Bananas" and "Take the Money and Run. " Rose, who went on to become a television comedy writer, penning jokes and sketches for Johnny Carson, Sid Caesar and other top comedians and shows of his era, died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills....
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2004 | Gina Nahai, Special to The Times
On a quiet evening in the spring of 1940, at a lab on the Oxford University campus, a young British scientist is witnessing nothing short of a miracle. For months now, he and his colleagues have watched a certain strain of common mold, Penicillium notatum, eradicate the bacteria responsible for some of the most fearsome, devastating illnesses that plague man.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010 | By Tim Rutten
"Faith," wrote the theologian and Christian existentialist Paul Tillich, "is the state of being ultimately concerned." But does that concern express itself most authentically in certainties or questions? Eric Lax's "Faith, Interrupted: A Spiritual Journey" suggests that, sometimes, the answer is both -- though both may be unexpected. Lax is perhaps best known as Woody Allen's discerning biographer, yet his eight previous books include not only intelligently empathetic works on actors and comedy but also lucid explorations of pivotal medical advances.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010 | By Tim Rutten
"Faith," wrote the theologian and Christian existentialist Paul Tillich, "is the state of being ultimately concerned." But does that concern express itself most authentically in certainties or questions? Eric Lax's "Faith, Interrupted: A Spiritual Journey" suggests that, sometimes, the answer is both -- though both may be unexpected. Lax is perhaps best known as Woody Allen's discerning biographer, yet his eight previous books include not only intelligently empathetic works on actors and comedy but also lucid explorations of pivotal medical advances.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007 | Tod Goldberg, Special to The Times
Of the iconic American filmmakers of the last half-century, Woody Allen has suffered mightily for his professional and personal proclivities. The sheer weight of his output -- nearly 40 films in the last 40 years -- dwarfs his peers, but the results have varied wildly.
BOOKS
May 26, 1991 | Susan Isaacs, Isaacs is a novelist and screenwriter
Woody Allen's autobiography! Witty, of course. Vulnerable, too, but perhaps the reader would be able to see, behind the artist's sensitivity, his shrewdness, his tough-mindedness, even his hard-heartedness as he protects and defends his work.
BOOKS
April 11, 2004 | Claire Panosian Dunavan, Claire Panosian Dunavan is professor of medicine at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, a practicing infectious diseases doctor and a medical writer.
Every day, men, women and children are rescued from dangerous infections by drugs that began -- in the words of author Eric Lax -- as "a blue-green moon of mold [that] shone over a sea of islets of staphylococci." The fuzzy trespasser on the culture plate of bacteria was the fungus that makes penicillin. It was Alexander Fleming, a shy and eccentric microbiologist, who first spotted it in his laboratory at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The year was 1928.
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | DAVID THOMSON, David Thomson is the author of "The Biographical Dictionary of Film." His most recent book is "Rosebud: The Story of Orson Welles" (Knopf). He is also film writer for Esquire
No one had much right to expect that "Bogart" would be an immediate triumph, but I believe it is. So rich in its research, so compelling in its writing, it is an absorbing human story that reveals an exact understanding of the motion picture business in the age of Humphrey Bogart, who died 40 years ago. That lack of advance faith has nothing to do with the caliber of the authors. It was a consequence of Bogart being done and done in print, beyond staleness or cliche.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1992
"It has incorrectly been picked up from an error in Eric Lax's biography of (Woody) Allen that it was Michael Caine, not I, who introduced Woody to Mia (Farrow). While it makes for a much more glamorous story to say that Michael introduced them, and while Mr. Caine was with me at the time, it was I who went over to Woody's table at the Upper East Side celebrity hangout Elaine's and told Woody that Mia wanted to meet him and took him by the hand back to our table and introduced them." --Robert M.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007 | Tod Goldberg, Special to The Times
Of the iconic American filmmakers of the last half-century, Woody Allen has suffered mightily for his professional and personal proclivities. The sheer weight of his output -- nearly 40 films in the last 40 years -- dwarfs his peers, but the results have varied wildly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2004 | Gina Nahai, Special to The Times
On a quiet evening in the spring of 1940, at a lab on the Oxford University campus, a young British scientist is witnessing nothing short of a miracle. For months now, he and his colleagues have watched a certain strain of common mold, Penicillium notatum, eradicate the bacteria responsible for some of the most fearsome, devastating illnesses that plague man.
BOOKS
April 11, 2004 | Claire Panosian Dunavan, Claire Panosian Dunavan is professor of medicine at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, a practicing infectious diseases doctor and a medical writer.
Every day, men, women and children are rescued from dangerous infections by drugs that began -- in the words of author Eric Lax -- as "a blue-green moon of mold [that] shone over a sea of islets of staphylococci." The fuzzy trespasser on the culture plate of bacteria was the fungus that makes penicillin. It was Alexander Fleming, a shy and eccentric microbiologist, who first spotted it in his laboratory at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The year was 1928.
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | DAVID THOMSON, David Thomson is the author of "The Biographical Dictionary of Film." His most recent book is "Rosebud: The Story of Orson Welles" (Knopf). He is also film writer for Esquire
No one had much right to expect that "Bogart" would be an immediate triumph, but I believe it is. So rich in its research, so compelling in its writing, it is an absorbing human story that reveals an exact understanding of the motion picture business in the age of Humphrey Bogart, who died 40 years ago. That lack of advance faith has nothing to do with the caliber of the authors. It was a consequence of Bogart being done and done in print, beyond staleness or cliche.
BOOKS
May 26, 1991 | Susan Isaacs, Isaacs is a novelist and screenwriter
Woody Allen's autobiography! Witty, of course. Vulnerable, too, but perhaps the reader would be able to see, behind the artist's sensitivity, his shrewdness, his tough-mindedness, even his hard-heartedness as he protects and defends his work.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Monday's "Judgement (sic) Night," as it's lightly called, of the International Imitation Hemingway Competition. The contest is about writing "one really good page of really bad" Ernest Hemingway. It was held in Century City at Harry's Bar & American Grill, a clean, well-lit place that validates for parking. Who Competes: Eric Lax described the ideal competitor as "a guy who bullfights in the shower."
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