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Eric Mendelsohn

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
William Lorton is standing in front of the Paleis des Festival, a pile of printed material in his hands. "They gave this to me," he says with a kind of ironic disbelief, "because I'm a director." Inside the gargantuan Paleis a few days later, Eric Mendelsohn is walking excitedly down the halls. He has just shared a stage with French actor and Cannes Jury President Gerard Depardieu and made some brief remarks to a packed theater in hesitant French.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
William Lorton is standing in front of the Paleis des Festival, a pile of printed material in his hands. "They gave this to me," he says with a kind of ironic disbelief, "because I'm a director." Inside the gargantuan Paleis a few days later, Eric Mendelsohn is walking excitedly down the halls. He has just shared a stage with French actor and Cannes Jury President Gerard Depardieu and made some brief remarks to a packed theater in hesitant French.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL
The title character in the upcoming indie film "Judy Berlin" is played by actress Edie Falco, best-known as for her Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning role as Carmela Soprano, the beleaguered mob wife in HBO's acclaimed drama series "The Sopranos." "Judy Berlin" is an ironic and often comic look at relationships in the Long Island town of Babylon on the day of a solar eclipse. The film co-stars Madeline Kahn, who died late last year of ovarian cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eric Mendelsohn's "Judy Berlin" is a comedy of the most delicately balanced perfection, rueful yet radiant, every moment calibrated with exquisite precision for just the right effect. And yet it never seems less than spontaneous. It is a film permeated with the feeling that its maker knows exactly where he's headed, all the while overflowing with a sense of revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
"U nbelievable! . . . Dickensian! . . . An amazing visual feast!" Gene Shalit providing a blurb for the movie ads? Gene Siskel, perhaps? John Simon? Jim Whaley? Nope, just suddenly prominent film enthusiast Jay Leno, rave-reviewing "Batman Returns"--kind of--in the course of interviewing director Tim Burton. Leno hasn't turned into a critic upon assuming "The Tonight Show" throne. "I'm probably a movie buff the way the average person is a movie buff," he says modestly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First-time writer-director Eric Mendelsohn won the directing award at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival for his eccentric black-and-white fable "Judy Berlin," starring a pre-"The Sopranos" Edie Falco and the late Madeline Kahn in her final film role. Like many Sundance entries, "Judy Berlin" attracted some studio nibbles, but none bit. Until now.
OPINION
June 21, 1992 | Thomas S. Hines, Thomas S. Hines, who teaches cultural and architectural history at UCLA, is author of "Richard Neutra and the Search for Modern Architecture" (Oxford University)
As Los Angeles burned in late April and early May, the images of violence on the TV screen called up counter-images of 50 years ago, when Richard Neutra, California's greatest modernist architect, designed the "Amity Village" housing complex for Compton. In many ways, this ambitious but unbuilt scheme epitomized the high aspirations and the countless broken promises for improving the quality of life in South-Central Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like God's pure snow, which traditionally arrives in this skiing town just in time to delight nature-starved moviegoers, obsessive behavior in general and sexual obsessiveness in particular have blanketed the Sundance Film Festival. And don't think that hasn't been noticed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Charity began at home for the Sundance Film Festival, as Tony Bui's "Three Seasons," which was developed at a Sundance Institute Feature Film Lab, won three awards Saturday night, including the Grand Jury Prize in the dramatic competition. Beautifully shot (by Lisa Rinzler, who won the Cinematography Award) and delicately paced, "Three Seasons" intertwines a trio of stories set in today's Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's in a name? Well, it depends on where you find it. At this year's Sundance Film Festival, there are plenty of big names in smaller independent movies: Val Kilmer. Ethan Hawke. Kate Winslet. Alec Baldwin. Peter Fonda. Helen Mirren. Lili Taylor. Rosie Perez. Gina Gershon. Roseanna Arquette. Ally Sheedy. Anna Paquin. In a mainstream Hollywood film, these names wouldn't occasion comment, but in the independent film community they've raised a few eyebrows.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2002 | BLAKE GREEN, NEWSDAY
The Belasco Theatre has a ghost. Stanley Tucci has a friend who swears he observed her wafting about. Edie Falco, wandering around the old Broadway house, "got completely creeped out in a stairwell just knowing about the possibility of running into something."
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