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April 3, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
One of the most admirable aspects of the upcoming jazz generation is the extent to which young musicians have absorbed the vast repertoire of this music. A splendid example was the performance Thursday, at the Brasserie of the Bel Age Hotel, where pianist Eric Reed was in charge. At 22, Reed is capable of decade-hopping with incredible ease. In the course of one set he swung his way jubilantly through jazz lines by Gillespie, Parker, Rollins, Clifford Brown, and ballads by Gershwin and Porter.
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February 3, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Opening nights in Los Angeles are not always easy for touring jazz artists. Arriving in town after cross-country flights, they must stroll onstage ready to perform at peak level, unfazed by jet lag or fatigue. Sometimes, as was the case with the Eric Reed Trio on Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery, they have to do so while at the mercy of an East Coast cold. To its credit, the group -- Reed playing piano, with bassist David Wong and drummer E.J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed, bassist John Clayton and drummer Jeff Hamilton share a single approach to music: Make it swing and swing hard. The three musicians played to that credo Thursday during the first set of a three-day run at Catalina Bar & Grill. The engagement reunites the pianist with Clayton, in whose bands he played some 10 years ago in Los Angeles. All three men now lead their own groups and record under their own names. Bringing them together for this engagement proved to be a master stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The 2003 Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl series continued its odd seasonal start-up Wednesday night with "Rejoice and Swing," a gospel-music-oriented program featuring the Eric Reed Trio, vocal group Take 6 and Grammy-winning gospel singer Yolanda Adams. Following last week's blues night and a Joao Gilberto bossa nova program coming up next week, it's hard not to wonder why it is taking so long to get down to the business of jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Eric Reed, the 23-year-old pianist who has earned valuable exposure with the Wynton Marsalis group, was at the Brasserie of the Bel Age Hotel Tuesday and Wednesday leading his own trio. Reed's knowledge of the roots of jazz enables him to skip decades with consummate ease, applying his technical finesse to everything from the traditional "Wade in the Water" to popular and jazz standards and an occasional original.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
At 19, Eric Reed is two years younger than Harry Connick Jr. and 20 years wiser. Appearing Friday at the Biltmore's Grand Avenue Bar, this phenomenal young pianist offered new evidence of the advances he has made since he performed, only months ago, as a student in a college band at Cal State Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Eric Reed, the youthful Los Angeles pianist who has worked with Buddy Collette, Gerald Wilson and has been leading his own bands around the Southland, has joined trumpeter Wynton Marsalis' group, replacing pianist Marcus Roberts. Reed will make his first official appearance with Marsalis tonight in San Antonio, Tex. "Marcus has left the group, and Eric has taken his position," said Christine Sullivan, assistant to Marsalis' manager, Ed Arrendell.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1995 | ZAN STEWART
The timing couldn't be better for pianist Eric Reed. The spotlight in jazz these days is on youth, and the 24-year-old Reed is getting lots of attention, resulting in opportunities to appear in situations where he can iron out his artistic kinks and grow as a performer. Monday night at Ambassador Auditorium was one such occasion for Reed, who was giving his first major Los Angeles concert hall performance.
NEWS
February 3, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Opening nights in Los Angeles are not always easy for touring jazz artists. Arriving in town after cross-country flights, they must stroll onstage ready to perform at peak level, unfazed by jet lag or fatigue. Sometimes, as was the case with the Eric Reed Trio on Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery, they have to do so while at the mercy of an East Coast cold. To its credit, the group -- Reed playing piano, with bassist David Wong and drummer E.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the tender age of 21, pianist Eric Reed, had held and left one of the most coveted positions in jazz--that as the keyboardist in trumpeter Wynton Marsalis' band. "It's not that I didn't like playing with Wynton," Reed explained. "I just wasn't real crazy about the music he was starting to play. "He was doing more standards, digging up his roots, playing close to his ties in New Orleans. I wasn't at a point where I wanted to deal with the music he was playing, I wasn't hearing it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed's performance in Zipper Hall at the Colburn School of Performing Arts on Sunday afternoon was a homecoming of sorts, since it was at the downtown institution that his considerable talents first began to surface in the early '80s. And to say those talents continued to emerge quickly is a considerable understatement. Before he had reached his 20th birthday, Reed already had performed locally with such heavyweights as Gerald Wilson, Teddy Edwards and John Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed has been one of the Southland's prime young jazz talents for nearly a decade. And he's still in his 20s. Although he's been living in New York City for the past few years, often performing with Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, his strong family roots continue to draw him back to his hometown. So it was appropriate on Tuesday, in the opening set of a five-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill, that Reed was leading a quintet he chose to call Family Reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1998 | Bill Kohlhaase
Eric Reed has an uncanny ability for recasting jazz and pop standards in unusual rhythmic formats. In addition, he's an especially rhythmic pianist. Those two skills combine to make this trio date, with bassist Reginald Veal and drummer Greg Hutchinson, Reed's most rewarding album to date. It begins with a clever, kaleidoscopic overture of the themes to follow, dissolves into a galloping "Maria" from "West Side Story," then jump-kicks its way through "Hello Young Lovers."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed, bassist John Clayton and drummer Jeff Hamilton share a single approach to music: Make it swing and swing hard. The three musicians played to that credo Thursday during the first set of a three-day run at Catalina Bar & Grill. The engagement reunites the pianist with Clayton, in whose bands he played some 10 years ago in Los Angeles. All three men now lead their own groups and record under their own names. Bringing them together for this engagement proved to be a master stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed has been one of the Southland's prime young jazz talents for nearly a decade. And he's still in his 20s. Although he's been living in New York City for the past few years, often performing with Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, his strong family roots continue to draw him back to his hometown. So it was appropriate on Tuesday, in the opening set of a five-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill, that Reed was leading a quintet he chose to call Family Reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Eric Reed's performance in Zipper Hall at the Colburn School of Performing Arts on Sunday afternoon was a homecoming of sorts, since it was at the downtown institution that his considerable talents first began to surface in the early '80s. And to say those talents continued to emerge quickly is a considerable understatement. Before he had reached his 20th birthday, Reed already had performed locally with such heavyweights as Gerald Wilson, Teddy Edwards and John Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1995 | ZAN STEWART
The timing couldn't be better for pianist Eric Reed. The spotlight in jazz these days is on youth, and the 24-year-old Reed is getting lots of attention, resulting in opportunities to appear in situations where he can iron out his artistic kinks and grow as a performer. Monday night at Ambassador Auditorium was one such occasion for Reed, who was giving his first major Los Angeles concert hall performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the tender age of 21, pianist Eric Reed, had held and left one of the most coveted positions in jazz--that as the keyboardist in trumpeter Wynton Marsalis' band. "It's not that I didn't like playing with Wynton," Reed explained. "I just wasn't real crazy about the music he was starting to play. "He was doing more standards, digging up his roots, playing close to his ties in New Orleans. I wasn't at a point where I wanted to deal with the music he was playing, I wasn't hearing it.
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