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Eric Rentschler

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November 15, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time he boarded a plane to leave after five weeks in West Berlin, Eric Rentschler had witnessed a remarkable slice of history--but little did he know that the most amazing was yet to come. "One feels rather stupid," Rentschler offered sheepishly in his office at UC Irvine, where he is director of film studies and a professor of German. He left West Berlin on Nov. 4 to make a scheduled appearance at a film panel in Toronto, "so I missed everything by about five days."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time he boarded a plane to leave after five weeks in West Berlin, Eric Rentschler had witnessed a remarkable slice of history--but little did he know that the most amazing was yet to come. "One feels rather stupid," Rentschler offered sheepishly in his office at UC Irvine, where he is director of film studies and a professor of German. He left West Berlin on Nov. 4 to make a scheduled appearance at a film panel in Toronto, "so I missed everything by about five days."
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NEWS
April 11, 1990
Times Book Editor Jack Miles is one of 16 Californians and a total of 143 artists, scholars and scientists chosen to receive Guggenheim Fellowship Awards for 1990. The new fellows will share more than $3.7 million awarded by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, which has held the annual competition for 66 years. Miles' award is for the writing of a book on how religious imagery has been used both to incite and to inhibit violence. Its working title is "The Blood of the Lamb."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Goethe Institute, 5700 Wilshire Blvd., will present "The Forbidden Films," six mid-'60s East German films banned until the Berlin Wall crumbled in 1989. The series begins Tuesday at 7 p.m. with an introduction by UC Irvine professor Eric Rentschler, to be followed at 8 p.m. by Jurgen Bottcher's "Born in '45." What's most amazing about these six pictures is not that they were banned but that their makers dared to attempt such critical films in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From censorship to freedom, from darkness to light. The transformation of East German society--and the impact on artists--since the dismantling of the Berlin Wall has been painted for Western audiences in black and white. But Wolfgang Kohlhaase, a scriptwriter in East Germany's DEFA studio almost since its inception in 1949, knows enough to see the shades of gray as the nation's filmmakers prepare to trade the constraints of state control for the new challenges of the free market.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
England has everyone from Sherlock Holmes to Miss Marple, America boasts Sam Spade and Phillip Marlowe, even modest Sweden can claim the somber Martin Beck. But try and think of a celebrated German detective and you'll probably end up agreeing with George Bernard Shaw when he said, "The Germans lack talent for two things: revolution and crime novels."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Do young men go off to war in part because they have seen Hollywood movies that glorify military combat? To hear Ron Kovic tell it, he and thousands like him did. "I think a lot of us went to Vietnam with movie images of John Wayne in our minds," he said last week. "On a reconnaissance patrol, I remember once imagining that I was John Wayne."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1995 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic. and
Of all the film footage taken of Adolf Hitler, a brief, nominally benign sequence turns out to be the most surprising and disturbing. As presented in Philippe Mora's little-seen 1973 documentary "Swastika," this was a fragment of silent color home movies shot by Eva Braun at the leader's Berchtesgaden retreat. Hitler is shown chatting on a terrace with some young women on his staff, his words cleverly decoded into subtitles with the help of a lip reader.
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