Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEric Schlosser
IN THE NEWS

Eric Schlosser

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
To know where you are, it helps to know where you've been, right? So early in his deeply reported, deeply frightening story of America's massive nuclear arsenal, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," investigative reporter Eric Schlosser takes us back to World War II and the Manhattan Project. The day after the "Trinity" test in the desert of New Mexico, dozens of scientists who had worked on the bomb signed a petition addressed to President Harry S. Truman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
To know where you are, it helps to know where you've been, right? So early in his deeply reported, deeply frightening story of America's massive nuclear arsenal, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," investigative reporter Eric Schlosser takes us back to World War II and the Manhattan Project. The day after the "Trinity" test in the desert of New Mexico, dozens of scientists who had worked on the bomb signed a petition addressed to President Harry S. Truman.
Advertisement
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Emily Bazelon, Emily Bazelon is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
You read Eric Schlosser to get mad. Or better yet, because you're already mad and you want to be able to explain why everyone else should be. With his bestseller "Fast Food Nation," Schlosser became the go-to guy for anyone inclined to rail against McDonald's. Forget about tasteless and fatty hamburgers -- Schlosser's reporting showed that the rot in the industry goes much deeper, into the slaughterhouses and restaurant kitchens where poor immigrants and teenagers toil.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
On a gorgeous spring morning, Eric Schlosser, investigative journalist and author of "Fast Food Nation" -- the expose of the fast-food industry and how it manipulates customers to buy food that isn't good for them -- is speaking to his latest audience: preteens and teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
In the world of journalism, investigative reporters are the test pilots, almost as glamorous as foreign correspondents. Integrity, courage, dogged curiosity and a general disregard for personal hygiene are their movie-version personality traits. But mild-mannered Eric Schlosser has higher goals and lesser motivations. He writes about the things that bug him: the grief of families of murder victims, the American prison-industrial complex, and the seduction of America by the fast-food industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
On a gorgeous spring morning, Eric Schlosser, investigative journalist and author of "Fast Food Nation" -- the expose of the fast-food industry and how it manipulates customers to buy food that isn't good for them -- is speaking to his latest audience: preteens and teenagers.
BOOKS
March 11, 2001 | TOM VANDERBILT, Tom Vanderbilt is the author of "The Sneaker Book: An Anatomy of an Industry and an Icon" (The New Press)
"Fast Food Nation" is a passionately argued, incendiary polemic about a subject close to our hearts (and stomachs), and Eric Schlosser may be the Upton Sinclair for this age of mad-cow disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Chew on This Everything You Don't Want to Know About Fast Food Eric Schlosser and Charles Wilson Houghton Mifflin: 304 pp., $16 * AT the dawn of the 1960s, our newly elected, youthful president, John F. Kennedy, popularized a nationwide physical fitness program for schoolchildren. Even in those days before computers and video games, he worried that kids were spending too much time watching television, being chauffeured by their parents and just not getting enough exercise.
NEWS
November 21, 2002
"Fast Food Nation" By Eric Schlosser Houghton Mifflin (January 2001) "This is a brilliant book that describes everything that went wrong with the American Dream through the prism of our fast-food culture. I read it with relish, and also a large helping of fries and a medium Coke." Bill Maher, Comic and former host of ABC's "Politically Incorrect."
OPINION
November 1, 2004
Re "Super-Sized Deception from Fast-Food Giants," Commentary, Oct. 24: I completely agree with Eric Schlosser's points about the deception of these fast-food companies and other corporations that are misrepresenting what Proposition 72 would really do if passed. I was disappointed, however, that he wrote that "the only American workers who consistently earn less [than minimum wage] are migrant farm workers." I would have expected Schlosser to know better. In addition to farm workers, garment workers, janitors, day laborers, domestic workers, ethnic restaurant workers and many other workers in low-wage industries all usually earn less than minimum wage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Chew on This Everything You Don't Want to Know About Fast Food Eric Schlosser and Charles Wilson Houghton Mifflin: 304 pp., $16 * AT the dawn of the 1960s, our newly elected, youthful president, John F. Kennedy, popularized a nationwide physical fitness program for schoolchildren. Even in those days before computers and video games, he worried that kids were spending too much time watching television, being chauffeured by their parents and just not getting enough exercise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
In the world of journalism, investigative reporters are the test pilots, almost as glamorous as foreign correspondents. Integrity, courage, dogged curiosity and a general disregard for personal hygiene are their movie-version personality traits. But mild-mannered Eric Schlosser has higher goals and lesser motivations. He writes about the things that bug him: the grief of families of murder victims, the American prison-industrial complex, and the seduction of America by the fast-food industry.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Emily Bazelon, Emily Bazelon is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
You read Eric Schlosser to get mad. Or better yet, because you're already mad and you want to be able to explain why everyone else should be. With his bestseller "Fast Food Nation," Schlosser became the go-to guy for anyone inclined to rail against McDonald's. Forget about tasteless and fatty hamburgers -- Schlosser's reporting showed that the rot in the industry goes much deeper, into the slaughterhouses and restaurant kitchens where poor immigrants and teenagers toil.
BOOKS
March 11, 2001 | TOM VANDERBILT, Tom Vanderbilt is the author of "The Sneaker Book: An Anatomy of an Industry and an Icon" (The New Press)
"Fast Food Nation" is a passionately argued, incendiary polemic about a subject close to our hearts (and stomachs), and Eric Schlosser may be the Upton Sinclair for this age of mad-cow disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
For 10 years, Walt Disney Co. and McDonald's appeared to have the perfect marriage. Happy Meals bore little figurines of Nemo, Mr. Incredible and 101 Dalmatians. But no more. This is one relationship that's ending in part because of the children. Disney is not renewing its cross-promotional pact with the fast-food giant, ending the arrangement with this summer's release of "Cars" and "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest."
FOOD
April 24, 2002
Rankings are based on a Times poll of national and independent cookbook sellers. *--* Last Week Weeks on List 1 "The Healthy Kitchen" by Andrew Weil 1 4 and Rosie Daley (Knopf, $24.95). Healthy recipes from a doctor and Oprah's former chef 2 "I'm Just Here for the Food" by Alton -- 2 Brown (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $32.50). A hip textbook from another Food Network personality 3 "Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen" by 4 20 Lidia Bastianich (Knopf, $35).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|