Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEric Tannenbaum
IN THE NEWS

Eric Tannenbaum

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 13, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest of a string of setbacks for Michael Ovitz's entertainment enterprise, the head of his ill-fated television company has filed a $9.6-million fraud, defamation and breach-of-contract suit against Ovitz and his companies. Ovitz is struggling to steady his core management company during the current barrage of bad news.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 16, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the continuing saga of Michael Ovitz's crumbling entertainment company, the onetime Hollywood kingmaker alleges in court papers that Eric Tannenbaum, the former head of his now-defunct television company, wasted millions of dollars and seriously mismanaged the venture. A declaration filed Wednesday by Ovitz in Los Angeles Superior Court states that throughout the 21/2 years Artists Television Group was in operation, "I learned of many facts that gave me grave concerns regarding Mr.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 7, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirtysomething is back in vogue in TV land. Jamie Tarses is 32 and the new president of ABC Entertainment, where she oversees prime-time programming. Eric Tannenbaum, 33, runs Columbia TriStar Television, which produces such shows as "The Nanny" and "Mad About You." Gavin Polone, also 32, recently jettisoned a career as one of Hollywood's top television agents to be a business manager.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest of a string of setbacks for Michael Ovitz's entertainment enterprise, the head of his ill-fated television company has filed a $9.6-million fraud, defamation and breach-of-contract suit against Ovitz and his companies. Ovitz is struggling to steady his core management company during the current barrage of bad news.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the continuing saga of Michael Ovitz's crumbling entertainment company, the onetime Hollywood kingmaker alleges in court papers that Eric Tannenbaum, the former head of his now-defunct television company, wasted millions of dollars and seriously mismanaged the venture. A declaration filed Wednesday by Ovitz in Los Angeles Superior Court states that throughout the 21/2 years Artists Television Group was in operation, "I learned of many facts that gave me grave concerns regarding Mr.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | JAMES BATES
Artists Management Group, the Beverly Hills management company founded by former talent agent Michael Ovitz, said Tuesday that it is forming a division to develop comedy talent and package comedy shows. Artists Comedy Group will be led by two former William Morris Agency agents, James Dixon and Mike August, who the company said will work with talent agencies, including Morris, to develop programs.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Michael Ovitz has settled a suit seeking as much as $10 million brought by the top executive at his shuttered Artists Management Group television unit. Eric Tannenbaum claimed that the Hollywood agent lured him away from his job as president of Sony Corp.'s Columbia TriStar Television by falsely claiming that the TV unit had a $1-billion line of credit. The parties reached their agreement within the last two weeks, Tannenbaum's attorney said.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Michael Ovitz, the super-agent who was formerly president of Walt Disney Co., is moving his talent management firm into television production. Eric Tannenbaum, the president of Sony Corp.'s Columbia TriStar Television, is joining Ovitz's new agency, AMG Entertainment, as a partner and will be president of Artists Television Group, a newly formed TV studio. Ovitz, who formed AMG last year, is trying to build an integrated media company using his clients to branch into movies and television.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1996
Eric Tannenbaum has been named to the new position of president of Sony's Columbia TriStar Television, a group formed by consolidating the TriStar and Columbia labels. Tannenbaum was formerly executive vice president of TriStar Television. His counterpart at Columbia, Jeff Wachtel, was named head of a new company, 3 Arts Television, formed Wednesday by Sony, CBS and the talent management firm of 3 Arts Entertainment.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former superagent Michael Ovitz's run as a network television supplier suffered a few setbacks Thursday, as one show from his Artists Television Group was canceled and another was pulled off the air and placed in near-cancellation limbo.
NEWS
October 7, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirtysomething is back in vogue in TV land. Jamie Tarses is 32 and the new president of ABC Entertainment, where she oversees prime-time programming. Eric Tannenbaum, 33, runs Columbia TriStar Television, which produces such shows as "The Nanny" and "Mad About You." Gavin Polone, also 32, recently jettisoned a career as one of Hollywood's top television agents to be a business manager.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helene Michaels is leaving her position as president of network production at Columbia TriStar Television, continuing a period of executive turnover at the Sony Pictures Entertainment division. Michaels' forced exit comes six months after the arrival of Len Grossi as president of Sony's television unit.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|