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Eric Weissmann

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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
The working title might be "To Russia With Net Profit." The production? Teaching Soviet film makers and lawyers the art of the Hollywood deal--including the occasional double-cross. Above the line, below the line, break-even point, pickups, backend deals, indie deals, union contracts--the whole arcane business, with its jargon, is about to be dissected for the Soviets by a top entertainment lawyer, Eric Weissmann.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
The working title might be "To Russia With Net Profit." The production? Teaching Soviet film makers and lawyers the art of the Hollywood deal--including the occasional double-cross. Above the line, below the line, break-even point, pickups, backend deals, indie deals, union contracts--the whole arcane business, with its jargon, is about to be dissected for the Soviets by a top entertainment lawyer, Eric Weissmann.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | Joe Mathews and Michael Cieply, Times Staff Writers
In his transition from movie star to political candidate, Arnold Schwarzenegger this week ran afoul of someone close to him: his Hollywood agent. While rolling out his team of economic advisors Wednesday, Schwarzenegger and his representatives at the powerful Creative Artists Agency wound up contradicting each other. Schwarzenegger said his agency was endorsing him for governor. (The agency said no.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Roman Polanski. The name is steeped in Hollywood lore, from the director's critically acclaimed films "Chinatown" and "Rosemary's Baby" to the stark details of his personal life: the murder of his wife, Sharon Tate, by followers of Charles Manson, and Polanski's flight from America in 1978 to avoid sentencing for having unlawful sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2008 | Gina Piccalo and Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writers
The tentative settlement reached this week between the Directors Guild and producers bolstered hopes that talks would resume in the writers strike, but it wasn't enough to relieve the queasy reality settling on Hollywood that the Academy Awards may go the way of the celebrity-free ratings downer that was Sunday's Golden Globes. However, Gilbert Cates, producer of the award telecast, remains adamant that on Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What hath "It's a Wonderful Life" wrought? That all-time holiday favorite has inspired dozens of seasonal weepies, some of which lay on sentiment so thick that it would make Frank Capra blush. Take this season's offerings: * In "Patch Adams," Robin Williams plays a first-year medical student who breeches hospital protocol by slipping into a ward of cancer-stricken children and bringing smiles to their little faces by clowning about in a rubber nose with bedpans on his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
First they met up with a zany British comedian hiding behind a faux-Kazakh accent, a video camera and a mean streak. Now, they're caught up in a little adventure that might be called "Cultural Learnings of What Happens When You Sign Glorious Hollywood Release Form."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | Jack Mathews, This article was written by Times film editor Jack Mathews from reporting by himself, Elaine Dutka and Nina J. Easton.
* A film producer sends 10 copies of a script to 10 different directors, attaching notes to each one saying, "You're my first choice." An ethical lapse? Ten little white lies? Or business as usual? * A major studio agrees to a star's salary demand, but insists on paying some of it "on the side" so the true amount won't be used by agents of other actors as leverage in future negotiations. Deceit? Or just a savvy competitive dodge?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision heard around the world, Academy Award voters selected "A Beautiful Mind" as best picture, effectively squelching an apparent smear campaign that accused the filmmakers of omitting potentially embarrassing details about John Forbes Nash Jr., the real-life mathematical genius on whom the haunting biographical drama is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
"What I like about this particular award is that it doesn't come from our peer group. The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. is a very loose group of guys and gals. You almost feel you could go out and have fun with them because they don't have as much to lose as we do." --Jack Nicholson at the 1999 Golden Globes * To paraphrase Professor Higgins, why can't the Academy Awards be more like the Golden Globes?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
They were friends and neighbors. She remembers him calling her late at night to bum a cigarette and discuss their lives as struggling writers and actors in Hollywood. He remembers bonding over their love of animals and helping her search the hills when her cat disappeared. But everything shattered after she wrote a screenplay about a woman obsessed with rescuing cats -- and he wrote a screenplay about a woman obsessed with rescuing dogs.
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