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Eric Whitacre

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June 19, 2011 | By Chloe Veltman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical composers don't generally attract hordes of screaming fans. But when Eric Whitacre appears at a convention, concert hall or college campus, groupies have been known to line up around the block hours in advance for the chance to meet the man with the flowing locks. With his latest album, "Light & Gold," debuting at No. 1 on the classical charts on both sides of the Atlantic, an enormous global following and a modeling contract to his name, Whitacre is arguably the first bona fide rock star to have emerged from the decidedly unglamorous field of contemporary choral music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Chloe Veltman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical composers don't generally attract hordes of screaming fans. But when Eric Whitacre appears at a convention, concert hall or college campus, groupies have been known to line up around the block hours in advance for the chance to meet the man with the flowing locks. With his latest album, "Light & Gold," debuting at No. 1 on the classical charts on both sides of the Atlantic, an enormous global following and a modeling contract to his name, Whitacre is arguably the first bona fide rock star to have emerged from the decidedly unglamorous field of contemporary choral music.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chalk up a win for classical music. Pacific Chorale composer-in-residence Eric Whitacre started out as a rocker, but singing Mozart changed all that. "I stumbled onto the whole thing," Whitacre, 30, said in a recent phone interview from his home in Sherman Oaks. "When I went to college, at the University of Nevada back in Las Vegas, I got tricked into singing in choir. The first thing we did was the Mozart Requiem. That was the piece that changed my life overnight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chalk up a win for classical music. Pacific Chorale composer-in-residence Eric Whitacre started out as a rocker, but singing Mozart changed all that. "I stumbled onto the whole thing," Whitacre, 30, said in a recent phone interview from his home in Sherman Oaks. "When I went to college, at the University of Nevada back in Las Vegas, I got tricked into singing in choir. The first thing we did was the Mozart Requiem. That was the piece that changed my life overnight."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES
The Pacific Chorale will open its 2001-02 season with a performance of Verdi's Requiem on Oct. 28 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Soloists will include soprano Camellia Johnson, mezzo-soprano Robynne Redmon, tenor Philip Webb and bass Stephen Bryant. Music director John Alexander will conduct the Chorale and the Pacific Symphony in this 7 p.m. performance. The season will continue: * Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2000
NEWPORT BEACH 4pm Music Formed in 1998, the Orange County Women's Chorus is a group devoted to a wide variety of repertoire and the only chorus of its kind in the county. For this holiday program, the chorus will team with guest artists, Men in Blaque, an Irvine-based men's chorus directed by Joseph Huszti. Their program, "Three Unbelievable Things About Christmas," will include works by Byrd, Praetorius, Brahms, Durufle and Daniel Pinkham.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Alexander's Pacific Chorale has a core of about 26 professional singers. At full strength, some 150 voices, however, it loses its professional edge. The singing lacks incisive attack, tension in line and variety in dynamic and color. Add to that a mostly a cappella program weighted toward sleep, death and mourning Sunday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, and the overall results were rather lugubrious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Famed jazz and pop singer-composer Bobby McFerrin will lead the final program of the Pacific Chorale's 2000-01 season, the organization announced Wednesday. McFerrin will conduct a program of Brahms and Schubert, as well as his works, at 8 p.m. May 19, 2001, at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Music director John Alexander will conduct the other three programs, also at the center: 7 p.m. Oct. 22, music by Bach and Handel, with Los Angeles-based Musica Angelica; 7 p.m. Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2006
Michael Michetti, co-artistic director of Pasadena's Theater@Boston Court, is one of L.A.'s busiest -- and most eclectic -- directors. He began his tenure at Boston Court in 2003 by setting "Romeo and Juliet" in 1836 antebellum New Orleans. His staging there of "Pera Palas," Sinan Unel's epic exploration of Turkey's Western and Islamic influences presented with Antaeus Company, was a multiple 2006 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2008 | Lynne Heffley
Los Angeles-based theater and concert composer David O sets the city to a melting-pot score in his new work, "A Map of Los Angeles," a fusion of Latin jazz and salsa, 1950s exotica, traditional ranchero music and contemporary minimalism. Commissioned by the Los Angeles Master Chorale, it will premiere as the centerpiece of the group's "Almost a cappella" performance Sunday at Walt Disney Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
American choral music concerts once meant a menu of cowboy songs, folk songs, spirituals --  comfortable campfire stuff.  They mean something quite different to Grant Gershon and today's Los Angeles Master Chorale. Sunday night's edition, the concluding concert of the Master Chorale's 49th season and a prelude to its 50th, looked like another of Gershon's iPod programs -- a satchel of things “from the last century and literally last week” (in Gershon's words), from the comfortable to the edgy.
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