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Erik Sorensen

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1988 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
The panel discussion was billed as "Sex, Sleaze & Sweeps"--a title that did not sit well with the panel members: news executives at three network-owned TV stations in Los Angeles. Nevertheless, in a rare joint appearance Thursday before a dinner audience of about 100 professional and student journalists, newsroom leaders at KABC-TV Channel 7, KNBC-TV Channel 4 and KCBS-TV Channel 2 reluctantly defended the controversial TV-ratings sweeps process. On grounds of money.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1988 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
The panel discussion was billed as "Sex, Sleaze & Sweeps"--a title that did not sit well with the panel members: news executives at three network-owned TV stations in Los Angeles. Nevertheless, in a rare joint appearance Thursday before a dinner audience of about 100 professional and student journalists, newsroom leaders at KABC-TV Channel 7, KNBC-TV Channel 4 and KCBS-TV Channel 2 reluctantly defended the controversial TV-ratings sweeps process. On grounds of money.
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OPINION
October 16, 2003
Re "Hershey's Deserves a Bad Rap for This Bitter Bit of 'Progress,' " Commentary, Oct. 13: Steve Almond obviously needs some help. It's only a wrapper. Just because the wrapper changes, it's not gonna be the end of the world. Oh no, it's the end of the world! Call the National Guard. It's minute, I'm telling you. Basically, no one cares about the wrapper. People only care if it tastes good or not. The wrapper isn't gonna make the business go down the drain. Erik Sorensen Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
How fitting that, 16 years after it was first produced, "M. Butterfly" has migrated back to its roots at East West Players. After all, the David Henry Hwang Theater, where the Tony-winning play is currently running, is named for its author, whose associations with East West stretch back decades. In many ways, this is a triumphal homecoming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From "Lysistrata" to "I Love Lucy" and beyond, the rebellion of women against self-serving male power has fueled some of the most memorable and improbable comedies of Western culture. It doesn't matter that the men in question consider themselves loving husbands, fathers or guardians: The fact that they regard women as property makes them ripe for public ridicule.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Oh, the eternal dilemma of the woman in love: Does she mask her intelligence and hobble her strength to keep from intimidating the guy? Or does she refuse to compromise, come what may? This predicament is studied anew in "Sex Parasite," a play by Jessica Goldberg that imagines the struggles faced by Olive Schreiner (1855-1920), whose social tracts influenced the early movement for women's rights. Already a much-produced playwright at 31, Goldberg is working with some ambitious ideas here.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2006 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
It's not often that one associates rising young playwrights with mastery of the classical form. Not yet 30 years old, Itamar Moses bucks the prevalent trend of elliptical modernism in "Bach at Leipzig," his classically deft comedy drama now at South Coast Repertory's Julianne Argyros Stage. "Bach" is set in 1722 Leipzig, a seat of culture in Saxony, just one of the increasingly fractious and fragmented Germanic states that will later coalesce into the country of Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley; Daryl H. Miller; David C. Nichols
Byron Yee has been honing his autobiographical one-man show, "Paper Son," for several years on the small-theater circuit. That polish shows in the play's production at the Gascon Center Theatre. A veteran stand-up comic with the timing to prove it, Yee, who was raised in Oklahoma, explains how he went in search of his Chinese roots and discovered a rich and unsuspected past.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
TV & MOVIES Kids Champ: Cable's Nickelodeon has won the 1998-99 TV season's Saturday morning ratings, topping all broadcast and cable competitors, according to Nielsen ratings figures released Thursday. Nickelodeon's Saturday kids' fare averaged 1.5 million viewers, with ABC and Fox each drawing about 1.1 million, followed by the WB network with 926,000. It's Nickelodeon's second year as the Saturday morning champ.
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