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Erik Weihenmayer

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NEWS
January 5, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the moment, a 32-year-old adventurer named Erik Weihenmayer is in Antarctica, climbing the 16,066-foot Vinson Massif, the tallest mountain of the frozen continent. If he succeeds, it will be another step toward his goal of climbing the tallest peak on each of the world's seven continents. He's already climbed those of Africa and North and South America. And in the spring, Weihenmayer will join a team of nine other experienced climbers to tackle the world's tallest peak, Mt. Everest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"High Ground" is a moving documentary that is both the film it presents itself to be and something more. And that something more turns out to have the biggest, most lasting impact. Nominally the story of healing and mental rehabilitation, of a mountaineering expedition in the Himalayas for 11 wounded and traumatized combat veterans, its most compelling segments deal with the pain, not the triumph. In its ability to let us hear firsthand what life-and-death combat does to the human body and spirit, this film has few peers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"High Ground" is a moving documentary that is both the film it presents itself to be and something more. And that something more turns out to have the biggest, most lasting impact. Nominally the story of healing and mental rehabilitation, of a mountaineering expedition in the Himalayas for 11 wounded and traumatized combat veterans, its most compelling segments deal with the pain, not the triumph. In its ability to let us hear firsthand what life-and-death combat does to the human body and spirit, this film has few peers.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the moment, a 32-year-old adventurer named Erik Weihenmayer is in Antarctica, climbing the 16,066-foot Vinson Massif, the tallest mountain of the frozen continent. If he succeeds, it will be another step toward his goal of climbing the tallest peak on each of the world's seven continents. He's already climbed those of Africa and North and South America. And in the spring, Weihenmayer will join a team of nine other experienced climbers to tackle the world's tallest peak, Mt. Everest.
NEWS
December 2, 2003 | Emmett Berg
Inside Base Camp; National Geographic Channel; Weekdays, 6:30 a.m. Interview shows the world over rise and fall on the quality of their guests. Those rules apply to "Inside Base Camp," on the National Geographic Channel, but I would add an accompanying creed: Stay True to Your Title. "Inside Base Camp" succeeds best when host Tom Foreman interviews camera-shy foot soldiers from National Geographic's vast network of photojournalists and outdoor adventurers.
NEWS
May 26, 2001 | Associated Press
Two Americans on Friday became the first blind climber and the oldest man to reach the Everest summit. They were among 94 people who scaled the world's highest peak in four days from the Nepalese side of the mountain. Erik Weihenmayer, 32, of Golden, Colo., became the first blind climber to conquer the 29,035-foot peak, according to the Nepalese Ministry of Tourism. Sherman Bull, a 64-year-old physician from New Canaan, Conn., was the oldest climber.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Erik Weihenmayer's feat at becoming the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest is truly remarkable, as are similar achievements of other handicapped athletes ("Disabled Athletes Determined to Raise the Bar," June 11). Using accomplishments such as his, however, to somehow justify expenditures for every type of handicap accommodation risks ignoring the realities of the handicapped population. Should we, for example, now spend huge sums to make Everest accessible by wheelchair?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001
If it sometimes seems as if the human spirit is flat-lining, that people are as selfish and sappy as "reality TV" suggests, it might be a good idea to look up. Last month's activity on Mt. Everest was astounding. The 29,035-foot summit, the world's highest, was climbed by a blind man, by the youngest person ever and by the oldest. Some dude even slid off the top of the world on a snowboard. But the real heroes of Mt. Everest this year never made the top.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"Blindsight" starts with voices and a black screen, voices discussing part of a high mountain climb that would be scary if we could see what was going on and feels downright terrifying because we can't. The people in "Blindsight," however, are not scared, not scared at all. Directed by the gifted Lucy Walker, "Blindsight" is a documentary about what happens when six blind Tibetan teenagers set out to climb one of the highest mountains in the world.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1996
Los Angeles will play host to a different kind of film festival this week. There won't be limos, movie stars or Armani-clad moguls, but there will be plenty of filmmakers who know a thing or two about digital technology. Hollywood studios might use digital tools to create 3-D animated toys or special effects, or in some kinds of editing, but hard-core enthusiasts toil away creating entire low- or no-budget films on their PCs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Louis Schwartzberg's "America's Heart & Soul" offers a stirring Norman Rockwell vision of the USA with plenty of uplift, not unwelcome in these perilous times and arriving just in time for the Fourth of July weekend. The emphasis is on those individuals who have taken advantage of our freedom to pursue their dreams, sometimes overcoming adversity or bettering the lives of others in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2008 | Gina Piccalo, Special to The Times
One blustery Wednesday morning, half a dozen blind Tibetans took turns leaping off a Dockweiler Beach sand dune in a specially equipped hang glider, daring even for the sighted. But hang gliding is nothing compared with the group's treacherous three-week climb up Mt. Everest, a life-altering feat chronicled in the new documentary "Blindsight."
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