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Eritrea Economy

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April 27, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Qudusam Sile was only 15 when she fired an AK-47 assault rifle for the first time. The tiny, ponytailed Eritrean was not much older when she killed the first of a dozen Ethiopian troops. During Africa's longest war of independence, Sile in turn took bullets in the back, leg and hand. "I was willing to do anything, to kill and even to die, to free Eritrea," she said with neither bravado nor guilt.
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NEWS
April 27, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Qudusam Sile was only 15 when she fired an AK-47 assault rifle for the first time. The tiny, ponytailed Eritrean was not much older when she killed the first of a dozen Ethiopian troops. During Africa's longest war of independence, Sile in turn took bullets in the back, leg and hand. "I was willing to do anything, to kill and even to die, to free Eritrea," she said with neither bravado nor guilt.
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WORLD
November 5, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
A rhythmic clamor of pounding hammers, buzzing grinders and clanging metal reverberates from the stone gateway of Eritrea's oldest open-air market. At first glance, the dusty bazaar behind downtown Asmara appears to be little more than a sprawling junkyard of rusted car parts, broken appliances and scraps of steel. But this isn't where old metal comes to die. It comes to be reborn. Used artillery shells are recast as combs for beauty salons. Empty vegetable-oil tins morph into coffee pots.
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