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NEWS
June 19, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enemy neighbors Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a U.S.-backed cease-fire agreement Sunday designed to halt their crushingly expensive two-year war, a deadly conflict considered so senseless that it has been likened to two bald men fighting over a comb. President Clinton hailed the accord calling for an immediate suspension of hostilities, signed in Algiers, as "a breakthrough which can and should end the tragic conflict in the Horn of Africa."
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NEWS
December 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ethiopia and Eritrea exchanged prisoners of war, commencing a two-day operation in which more than 700 sick or wounded men will return home, said an official of the International Committee of the Red Cross. A plane chartered by the Red Cross began ferrying the POWs between the two nations' capitals, said Alain Aeschlimann, the organization's Ethiopia chief. He said 226 Eritreans had been returned to their capital, Asmara, while 90 Ethiopians returned to their capital, Addis Ababa.
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NEWS
June 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
With stability in the Horn of Africa at stake, five African leaders are moving to take charge of frantic efforts to foster peace between Ethiopia and Eritrea. Taking over from a foundering U.S.-Rwanda effort to end the fighting, a team of African representatives appointed by the Organization of African Unity is to visit the feuding countries at the end of this week.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enemy neighbors Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a U.S.-backed cease-fire agreement Sunday designed to halt their crushingly expensive two-year war, a deadly conflict considered so senseless that it has been likened to two bald men fighting over a comb. President Clinton hailed the accord calling for an immediate suspension of hostilities, signed in Algiers, as "a breakthrough which can and should end the tragic conflict in the Horn of Africa."
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | Times Wire Services
This small Horn of Africa nation marked independence from Ethiopia in muted style Monday as its forces struggled to contain an offensive by its former ruler. Meanwhile, as Ethiopian troops dug in across key sections of western Eritrea, diplomatic efforts intensified to end the flare-up of fighting and restart peace talks.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ethiopia and Eritrea each reported inflicting heavy losses on the other as battles raged for a third day in a new round of their border war. Ignoring international pleas for restraint, the two former allies pounded each other with heavy artillery and aerial attacks while their troops battled for control of disputed border territories. Military analysts say the fighting resembles battles in World War I, when waves of soldiers poured out of trenches and into enemy fire.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Eritrea accepted an Organization of African Unity plan to end the bloody border conflict with neighboring Ethiopia, and the OAU gave a deadline of noon today for Ethiopia to reply. The plan calls for a halt in fighting and a redeployment of each country's troops to positions held before fighting broke out May 6, 1998, and for U.N. peacekeeping forces to guarantee the border while U.N. mediators demarcate the lines separating the two countries, diplomats involved in the talks said. The U.N.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | From Reuters
Eritrea and Ethiopia have accepted cease-fire proposals in principle and are expected to sign a formal agreement within a week, a mediator working to end their 2-year-old border war said Saturday. But, as Ethiopia launched a fresh offensive, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika--chairman of the Organization of African Unity, or OAU, which is hosting peace talks--admitted that there still were obstacles to an agreement.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They fought side by side against a common enemy, shared Western-oriented policies and won admirers in Washington, where they were viewed as exemplars of an emerging kind of African government--lawful, clean and economically vibrant--bringing stability to a troubled continent.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a tentative step to help defuse Africa's latest conflict, the White House announced Sunday that the warring governments of Eritrea and Ethiopia have accepted a U.S. proposal to "halt immediately" airstrikes and the threat of airstrikes. The announcement followed intervention by President Clinton, who talked with the two countries' leaders as he flew from Los Angeles to Washington.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | From Reuters
Eritrea and Ethiopia have accepted cease-fire proposals in principle and are expected to sign a formal agreement within a week, a mediator working to end their 2-year-old border war said Saturday. But, as Ethiopia launched a fresh offensive, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika--chairman of the Organization of African Unity, or OAU, which is hosting peace talks--admitted that there still were obstacles to an agreement.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Eritrea accepted an Organization of African Unity plan to end the bloody border conflict with neighboring Ethiopia, and the OAU gave a deadline of noon today for Ethiopia to reply. The plan calls for a halt in fighting and a redeployment of each country's troops to positions held before fighting broke out May 6, 1998, and for U.N. peacekeeping forces to guarantee the border while U.N. mediators demarcate the lines separating the two countries, diplomats involved in the talks said. The U.N.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | ANN. M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the pounding of shells echoed from beyond nearby mountain ranges and smoke issued from above, a stream of humanity flowed Saturday along the asphalt road out of this rocky hillside town and north toward the nation's capital, Asmara. Old men, women and children carrying bundles of their meager belongings tied in cloths across their backs trudged limply along in the sweltering heat, as truckloads of Eritrean troops rumbled by them toward the direction of the booming mortars.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | Times Wire Services
This small Horn of Africa nation marked independence from Ethiopia in muted style Monday as its forces struggled to contain an offensive by its former ruler. Meanwhile, as Ethiopian troops dug in across key sections of western Eritrea, diplomatic efforts intensified to end the flare-up of fighting and restart peace talks.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ethiopia and Eritrea each reported inflicting heavy losses on the other as battles raged for a third day in a new round of their border war. Ignoring international pleas for restraint, the two former allies pounded each other with heavy artillery and aerial attacks while their troops battled for control of disputed border territories. Military analysts say the fighting resembles battles in World War I, when waves of soldiers poured out of trenches and into enemy fire.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In resuming their costly war over a disputed border region, Ethiopia and Eritrea have further tipped the balance toward political instability, economic decline and social turmoil on a continent already relentlessly afflicted by war, analysts said Friday.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In resuming their costly war over a disputed border region, Ethiopia and Eritrea have further tipped the balance toward political instability, economic decline and social turmoil on a continent already relentlessly afflicted by war, analysts said Friday.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | KARL VICK, THE WASHINGTON POST
A simmering border dispute between two usually friendly neighbors erupted into airstrikes Friday when Ethiopian fighters bombed an airport in Eritrea, and Eritrea sent its planes to a provincial capital of the country that only five years ago gave it independence. The exchange dramatically escalated recent fighting that until Friday had been limited to ground skirmishes on a section of barren land that each country claims as its own.
NEWS
June 19, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Delicious Bakery, a local landmark near this city's Piazza neighborhood, customers sip tea, munch pastry and slurp milkshake-thick glasses of sweetened avocado juice. But ask for the owner, and you get nothing but nervous glances. That's because proprietor Gebre Tensaye was among hundreds of Eritrean businesspeople, government workers and political activists residing in Ethiopia who were rounded up by army soldiers in recent days.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a tentative step to help defuse Africa's latest conflict, the White House announced Sunday that the warring governments of Eritrea and Ethiopia have accepted a U.S. proposal to "halt immediately" airstrikes and the threat of airstrikes. The announcement followed intervention by President Clinton, who talked with the two countries' leaders as he flew from Los Angeles to Washington.
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