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October 5, 1997 | Chris Pasles, Chris Pasles is a Times staff writer
It's been called Holy Minimalism--the austere, ethereal tones of symphonies and masses, quartets and choral works, often bolstered by the close harmonies of throat singers, pure-sounding women's choirs and solo voices. Seemingly a byproduct of the breakup of the Soviet bloc, it has poured out from behind the former Iron Curtain since the mid-'80s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Chris Pasles, Chris Pasles is a Times staff writer
It's been called Holy Minimalism--the austere, ethereal tones of symphonies and masses, quartets and choral works, often bolstered by the close harmonies of throat singers, pure-sounding women's choirs and solo voices. Seemingly a byproduct of the breakup of the Soviet bloc, it has poured out from behind the former Iron Curtain since the mid-'80s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the joys of going to hear the Los Angeles Philharmonic on a regular basis, or any major orchestra for that matter, is sampling and assessing the conductorial flavor of the week. This modern situation, whereby a music director leads X weeks (usually a small percentage) of his orchestra's concerts and a parade of jet-setting guest conductors leads the rest, is a much-debated phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Michael Rydzynski
CONTRAST. That's what makes classical music live and breathe. That also aptly describes Leila Josefowicz. The Canadian-born, Grammy-nominated violinist, a former child prodigy who spent the better part of her training at the Curtis Institute of Music while living in Philadelphia and who now resides in New York, grew up in Southern California. "California's a great place to grow up in, especially the suburbs [Westlake Village], which is a huge contrast to my now living in the heart of Manhattan," says Josefowicz (pronounced joe-SEH-foh-wits)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't long ago that few of us knew anything about Estonian music. Then, in 1993, an ECM Records disc of Arvo Part's "Tabula Rasa" came out, and we watched with amazement as it climbed the Billboard charts. Something about this music--like that of Polish composer Henryk Gorecki--struck a new but universal chord. Subsequently, it was dubbed "Holy Minimalism." The artists on the Part disc were the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir and Tallinn Chamber Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
An unselfconscious generation of young composers who see no distinction between high art and low has come upon the scene. All the old controversies are over. But so too, as the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group demonstrated Tuesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall, is some of the fun. The earliest of the three works on this Green Umbrella Concert was Louis Andriessen's "De Stijl" (The Style). It was written in 1985, and the philharmonic's consulting composer for new music, Steven Stucky, described it in a talk before the concert as Stravinsky meets James Brown in Amsterdam and they smoke a joint.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Carl Nielsen's Symphony No. 4, given a riveting performance by the Cincinnati Symphony on Friday night at Orange County's Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, is titled "The Inextinguishable." Things weren't looking good for the Danish composer when he wrote this amazing score between 1914 and 1916. Europe had all but collapsed in its attempt to destroy itself with World War I. Nielsen's marriage was on the rocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005 | Mark Swed; Chris Pasles; Adam Baer; Richard S. Ginell
Wonders of Estonia "Action Passion Illusion" Nordic Symphony Orchestra. Anu Tali, conductor. (Warner Classics) *** The vanguard of women conductors tended to appear, of necessity, masculine or, at least, sexless. That may finally be changing. Anu Tali -- a gifted, statuesque blond Estonian conductor in her early 30s who founded the Nordic Symphony a few years ago -- is not afraid to make a kinky statement.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
TODAY WORLD MUSIC Her own global mix Imagine the soaring melodies of Joni Mitchell and the darkly lyrical twists and turns of Paul Simon, sung over a steaming caldron of African rhythms. But, as intriguing as that may sound, it still doesn't quite do justice to the music of Ashley Maher, who manages to use those fertile sources as the stimulation for songs and performances that are uniquely her own.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
In the 1980s and into the 1990s, a distinctly mystical music emanating from Eastern Europe began pervading the West. Geography didn't seem to matter. Whether it was Russians Alfred Schnittke and Sophia Gubaidulina, Estonian Arvo Part, Pole Henryk Gorecki or Georgian Giya Kancheli, they all seemed to share the same spirit of spiritual minimalism.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Relatives or guests are in town for the holidays and you're looking for concerts that won't break the bank. Sure, there are plenty of "Messiahs" and "Nutcrackers" and church services that feature serious music. But you're looking for something a little more worldly. You've taken them to the Walt Disney Concert Hall, but you're eager for an opportunity to show off the local geography. Now what? Fortunately, the Los Angeles region offers a host of other opportunities to hear classical music.
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