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Ernestine Anderson

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August 25, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Honest-to-goodness, real-life jazz singing is almost as rare these days as a nickel cup of coffee. Oh sure, there's plenty of jazz-influenced, jazz-based, jazz-styled singing (some of it very good, to be sure), and maybe an excess of vocals and shooby-do. But there are far too few remaining practitioners of the ancient and honorable art of singing good songs with the lift, the swing and the rare and subtle blending of music and emotion that characterizes the work of the best jazz improvisers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Four words saved Ernestine Anderson's singing career. They are not words most of us hear every day: Nam Myoho Renge Kyo. To those who practice the Nichiren Buddhist religion, however (and they include Herbie Hancock among other musicians), this chant had a special significance. Anderson's life in music had moved upward slowly during the 1950s and down precipitously in the '60s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Four words saved Ernestine Anderson's singing career. They are not words most of us hear every day: Nam Myoho Renge Kyo. To those who practice the Nichiren Buddhist religion, however (and they include Herbie Hancock among other musicians), this chant had a special significance. Anderson's life in music had moved upward slowly during the 1950s and down precipitously in the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The number of today's chanteuses still practicing the art of singing pure, straight-from-the-roots jazz has dwindled down to a precious few. Among them, the woman most likely to be overlooked is Ernestine Anderson. She is not often mentioned in the same breath with Ella Fitzgerald and Carmen McRae, though she belongs in their elite company.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The number of today's chanteuses still practicing the art of singing pure, straight-from-the-roots jazz has dwindled down to a precious few. Among them, the woman most likely to be overlooked is Ernestine Anderson. She is not often mentioned in the same breath with Ella Fitzgerald and Carmen McRae, though she belongs in their elite company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Divas: Simply Singing!," the sixth annual showcase of divadom at the Wilshire-Ebell Theatre on Saturday night, was, once again, a well-paced, professional production bursting with talent. It's a mystery why this event--so much more entertaining than any number of television variety shows--hasn't made it to the tube. The concert's producer, singer-actress Sheryl Lee Ralph, was, appropriately, the concert's centerpiece.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Lorez Alexandria, who opened Thursday at the Loa and closes Sunday, has enjoyed a relatively stable career as a singer who can command a receptive audience in the Southland's jazz clubs. Essentially, though, there have been few peaks or valleys; she is performing in the same kinds of venues, and singing much the same repertoire, that became associated with her when she moved here from Chicago in the early 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Barbara Morrison, who was Friday's vocal visitor to Lunaria's, is no stranger to the Southland, having worked with the Johnny Otis ensemble off and on for some 15 years. Now a protegee of Dionne Warwick, she is showing signs of developing into more than an occasional local presence. Her opener, "If I Lose This Dream," revealed a strong sound, jazz-conscious phrasing and timbral assurance.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER and DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gene Harris, a Grammy-nominated jazz pianist who organized and led the group the Three Sounds, has died. Harris died Sunday in Boise, Idaho, at the age of 66. The cause of death was kidney failure brought on by diabetes. A native of Benton Harbor, Mich., Harris taught himself to play boogie-woogie piano as a child after listening to the recordings of Pete Johnson and Albert Ammons. He performed from the age of 6 and played in a band while serving in the Army in the early 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE
As a member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, vibraharpist Milt Jackson is credited for providing raw, earthy contrast to the more staid approach of pianist John Lewis. But leading his own group Saturday at the Ambassador Auditorium, Jackson's delivery proved to be smoothly urbane and sophisticated. Backed by a top-shelf rhythm section of pianist Cedar Walton, bassist John Clayton and drummer Billy Higgins, Jackson played with a polish that generated no surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Honest-to-goodness, real-life jazz singing is almost as rare these days as a nickel cup of coffee. Oh sure, there's plenty of jazz-influenced, jazz-based, jazz-styled singing (some of it very good, to be sure), and maybe an excess of vocals and shooby-do. But there are far too few remaining practitioners of the ancient and honorable art of singing good songs with the lift, the swing and the rare and subtle blending of music and emotion that characterizes the work of the best jazz improvisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Celebrating the Count Basie centennial (he was born Aug. 21, 1904) was one of the better thematic ideas in the summer's Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl series. But the devil, as usual, was in the details, and Wednesday night's program only intermittently lived up to expectations. Placing the Count Basie Orchestra in the opening segment made sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Fifty-eight musical events to be performed between July 3 and Sept. 17 comprise the 1988 Hollywood Bowl season, announced Wednesday by Ernest Fleischmann, executive director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The L.A. Philharmonic will give 37 of these performances; the visiting Pittsburgh Symphony will give another five, Aug. 30-Sept. 3.
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