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January 21, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
"It's hard to adjust," Ernie Andrews said. Just last month, the veteran Los Angeles-based jazz, pop and blues singer returned home after a three-month tour of five continents as featured vocalist with the 18-man ensemble billed as Gene Harris and the Philip Morris Superband. As Andrews made clear, after working under the extraordinary conditions that prevailed during that tour, anything would seem anticlimactic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2011 | Kirk Silsbee
Sitting in the hall that she operates in Leimert Park on a recent afternoon, Barbara Morrison is uncharacteristically sedentary. She recently lost a leg to diabetes. While she speaks with customary grace and cheer, the jazz vocalist is in a period of adjustment. "The doctor said they needed to remove my leg to save my life," she relates matter-of-factly. "Thankfully, it doesn't affect my singing at all. " Morrison, who turns 62 on Saturday, is soon to be fitted for a prosthetic leg. Within the Los Angeles jazz community, Morrison is known as one of the busiest singers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernie Andrews is one of a kind--a jazz original whose utterly idiosyncratic singing style has never fully received the attention it warrants. So it was especially pleasurable Saturday night to hear him at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Fine Arts Complex with the Los Angeles Symphonic Camerata. At 74, Andrews comes from a generation of artists who were raised with the notion that performing with a string orchestra or a symphony somehow provided ultimate certification of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernie Andrews is one of a kind--a jazz original whose utterly idiosyncratic singing style has never fully received the attention it warrants. So it was especially pleasurable Saturday night to hear him at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Fine Arts Complex with the Los Angeles Symphonic Camerata. At 74, Andrews comes from a generation of artists who were raised with the notion that performing with a string orchestra or a symphony somehow provided ultimate certification of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about music for The Times
It's a fall Tuesday evening, and singer Ernie Andrews is on stage at the Nucleus Nuance, working his way through the splendid Percy Mayfield blues number "River's Invitation." On his last choruses, he departs from the tune's melody, improvising lyrics and rhythmic phrases as if he were an improviser playing a horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It comes as a surprise to learn that Ernie Andrews, the well-traveled singer with some 20 albums to his name, was once thrown out of his high-school vocal class. "The vocal coach kicked me out because I didn't sing the part she wanted," Andrews, 66, said by phone from his home in Los Angeles. "I was a baritone and she wanted me to sing something else. I told her, 'You can't make a pickax out of a shovel.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
"Blues for Central Avenue" (at the Music Hall in Beverly Hills through Tuesday) could easily be another generic documentary of the under-appreciated-musician school. But co-producer/director Lois Shelton's decision to focus on local jazz vocalist Ernie Andrews as a figurehead for the generation of artists who came of age here 40 years ago gives this film portrait an extra dimension and force.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2000 | DON HECKMAN SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernie Andrews comes from a generation of singers that had no difficulty reconciling the sometimes conflicting demands of creativity and communication. Like earlier great blues singers such as Joe Williams and Jimmy Rushing, he blends a hard-swinging, outgoing vocal style with a quick-witted sense of humor. And, like ballad artists such as Billy Eckstine and Herb Jeffries, he does so with a rich timbre, a gift for drama and a singular capacity to stimulate an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2011 | Kirk Silsbee
Sitting in the hall that she operates in Leimert Park on a recent afternoon, Barbara Morrison is uncharacteristically sedentary. She recently lost a leg to diabetes. While she speaks with customary grace and cheer, the jazz vocalist is in a period of adjustment. "The doctor said they needed to remove my leg to save my life," she relates matter-of-factly. "Thankfully, it doesn't affect my singing at all. " Morrison, who turns 62 on Saturday, is soon to be fitted for a prosthetic leg. Within the Los Angeles jazz community, Morrison is known as one of the busiest singers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
To all outward appearances, Ernie Andrews has had a successful career. Consider the credits: three major hits during his early years ("Soothe Me," "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," "Make Me a Present of You"), 10 years of steady work with the Harry James band, standing ovations everywhere from the Monterey Jazz Festival to jazz parties and clubs, record sessions for at least 17 labels, and only last month a powerful impact during a two-week job in Japan along with pianist Jack Wilson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2000 | DON HECKMAN SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernie Andrews comes from a generation of singers that had no difficulty reconciling the sometimes conflicting demands of creativity and communication. Like earlier great blues singers such as Joe Williams and Jimmy Rushing, he blends a hard-swinging, outgoing vocal style with a quick-witted sense of humor. And, like ballad artists such as Billy Eckstine and Herb Jeffries, he does so with a rich timbre, a gift for drama and a singular capacity to stimulate an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It comes as a surprise to learn that Ernie Andrews, the well-traveled singer with some 20 albums to his name, was once thrown out of his high-school vocal class. "The vocal coach kicked me out because I didn't sing the part she wanted," Andrews, 66, said by phone from his home in Los Angeles. "I was a baritone and she wanted me to sing something else. I told her, 'You can't make a pickax out of a shovel.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about music for The Times
It's a fall Tuesday evening, and singer Ernie Andrews is on stage at the Nucleus Nuance, working his way through the splendid Percy Mayfield blues number "River's Invitation." On his last choruses, he departs from the tune's melody, improvising lyrics and rhythmic phrases as if he were an improviser playing a horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
"It's hard to adjust," Ernie Andrews said. Just last month, the veteran Los Angeles-based jazz, pop and blues singer returned home after a three-month tour of five continents as featured vocalist with the 18-man ensemble billed as Gene Harris and the Philip Morris Superband. As Andrews made clear, after working under the extraordinary conditions that prevailed during that tour, anything would seem anticlimactic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
To all outward appearances, Ernie Andrews has had a successful career. Consider the credits: three major hits during his early years ("Soothe Me," "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," "Make Me a Present of You"), 10 years of steady work with the Harry James band, standing ovations everywhere from the Monterey Jazz Festival to jazz parties and clubs, record sessions for at least 17 labels, and only last month a powerful impact during a two-week job in Japan along with pianist Jack Wilson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
"Blues for Central Avenue" (at the Music Hall in Beverly Hills through Tuesday) could easily be another generic documentary of the under-appreciated-musician school. But co-producer/director Lois Shelton's decision to focus on local jazz vocalist Ernie Andrews as a figurehead for the generation of artists who came of age here 40 years ago gives this film portrait an extra dimension and force.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1995
The 12th annual Dolo Coker Scholarship benefit jazz concert, featuring appearances by Ernie Andrews, Art Hillery, Betty Bryant and others, will be held Sunday at 3 p.m. at Kinsey Auditorium in Exposition Park, 700 State Drive. Information (213) 935-1374.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2003
A benefit and tribute for saxophonist Teddy Edwards will be held Sunday at the Musicians Union in Hollywood. The Los Angeles-based jazz musician will be honored in a program that is expected to feature Ernie Andrews, Phil Upchurch, Leslie Drayton, Art Hillary, Frank Capp, Linda Hopkins and the Teddy Edwards String Ensemble, among others. Proceeds will go to medical care for Edwards, who has been battling cancer for eight years. The 2 p.m. event will be held at the Musicians Union, 817 N.
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