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Ernie Kovacs

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August 22, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
You have to wonder what Ernie Kovacs would have done with all of this, what kind of gleeful skit, what kind of satirical sketch, what kind of twist he would have put on what is happening in his name now. For suddenly, it seems, it's time again for "The Ernie Kovacs Show." On several fronts--on television, on home videos, in special shows and exhibitions, and in books--Ernie Kovacs is being remembered, discovered and celebrated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
The comedic genius Ernie Kovacs went dramatic in what 1960 Kirk Douglas-Kim Novak drama? "Strangers When We Meet"
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2001 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Best of Ernie Kovacs," along with the recently released "Sid Caesar Collection," is indispensable for anyone interested in the history of television comedy. Distributed by Kultur Video, this two-DVD set is a six-hour guided tour through Kovacsland, and a more surreal or cockeyed landscape was never broadcast over "the orthicon tube."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
From the early 1950s until his tragic death at the age of 42 in 1962 in a car crash, Ernie Kovacs turned the small screen into his own personal TV funhouse of cerebral, goofy, eccentric and visually inventive comedy, most often working with his wife, singer-actress Edie Adams. His comedic influence can be felt in such later groundbreaking shows as "Monty Python's Flying Circus," "Laugh-In" and "Saturday Night Live. " Thanks to his late wife, who saved an enormous amount of Kovacs' TV work, Shout Factory!
BOOKS
September 9, 1990 | Lawrence Christon, Christon is a Times staff writer.
For anyone who was around in the 1950s, when the medium of television was relatively new and hadn't yet become altogether defined, in Robert Hughes' phrase, as "wet-nurse to the culture," mere mention of the name Ernie Kovacs is enough to induce a near-paralysis of reverie. The Kapusta Kid, Percy Dovetonsils, the Nairobi Trio, Uncle Gruesome, the endlessly inventive bits that teased our naturalistic assumptions about time and space as viewed on the tube, the sheer sense of fun and gentle play that emanated from a Kovacs show, were wholly innovative then--and unmatched since (though the Monty Python troupe has come close)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
The comedic genius Ernie Kovacs went dramatic in what 1960 Kirk Douglas-Kim Novak drama? "Strangers When We Meet"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND and DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Television Academy Hall of Fame Sunday was to induct Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Leonard Goldenson, Jim Henson, Ernie Kovacs and Eric Sevareid during a ceremony taped for presentation Nov. 30 by Fox Broadcasting Co. The two-hour show will feature rare and vintage film chronicling the careers of the inductees, as well as tributes from such celebrities as Lucille Ball, Walter Cronkite, Phyllis Diller, Jack Lemon and David Wolper.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1987
The telecast of the American Comedy Awards show May 19 was humorous and interesting but omitted any recognition of Dick Shawn, who like Ernie Kovacs, Charlie Chaplin and Redd Foxx (none of whom was acknowledged either), was an original comedic presence and whose recent passing leaves quite a void. ABBY FRANKLIN Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brilliant. Innovative. Wacky. Original. Ernie Kovacs was all of the above and so much more. With his bushy eyebrows, mustache and ever-present cigar, Kovacs was one of the craziest and most visionary comedians to emerge during the Golden Age of TV in the 1950s. He pushed the visual envelope on his comedy-variety series "Ernie in Kovacsland" and "The Ernie Kovacs Show," and in his comedy specials. Kovacs also created the hysterically funny and beloved characters Percy Dovetonsils, Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can't make a living as a poet, which is one reason Wallace Stevens spent his days in an insurance office. You also can't make a living being a complete nut, which is one reason Alan Glasser spends his days in his law office and as a pro-tem judge for the Los Angeles Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angele Times Television Critic
At any given time, most things on television resemble other things on television, sharing narrative conventions and visual conceptions, techniques and technologies, even ways of treating and reflecting their audience. But there are always a few black sheep about, horses of a different color – artists who work against the system even as they operate within it and out of whatever combination of intention or helplessness create their own unaccountable realities. Two such other worlds get box-set video releases this month: "The Ernie Kovacs Collection" (Shout Factory, due April 19)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2001 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Best of Ernie Kovacs," along with the recently released "Sid Caesar Collection," is indispensable for anyone interested in the history of television comedy. Distributed by Kultur Video, this two-DVD set is a six-hour guided tour through Kovacsland, and a more surreal or cockeyed landscape was never broadcast over "the orthicon tube."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can't make a living as a poet, which is one reason Wallace Stevens spent his days in an insurance office. You also can't make a living being a complete nut, which is one reason Alan Glasser spends his days in his law office and as a pro-tem judge for the Los Angeles Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brilliant. Innovative. Wacky. Original. Ernie Kovacs was all of the above and so much more. With his bushy eyebrows, mustache and ever-present cigar, Kovacs was one of the craziest and most visionary comedians to emerge during the Golden Age of TV in the 1950s. He pushed the visual envelope on his comedy-variety series "Ernie in Kovacsland" and "The Ernie Kovacs Show," and in his comedy specials. Kovacs also created the hysterically funny and beloved characters Percy Dovetonsils, Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
You have to wonder what Ernie Kovacs would have done with all of this, what kind of gleeful skit, what kind of satirical sketch, what kind of twist he would have put on what is happening in his name now. For suddenly, it seems, it's time again for "The Ernie Kovacs Show." On several fronts--on television, on home videos, in special shows and exhibitions, and in books--Ernie Kovacs is being remembered, discovered and celebrated.
BOOKS
September 9, 1990 | Lawrence Christon, Christon is a Times staff writer.
For anyone who was around in the 1950s, when the medium of television was relatively new and hadn't yet become altogether defined, in Robert Hughes' phrase, as "wet-nurse to the culture," mere mention of the name Ernie Kovacs is enough to induce a near-paralysis of reverie. The Kapusta Kid, Percy Dovetonsils, the Nairobi Trio, Uncle Gruesome, the endlessly inventive bits that teased our naturalistic assumptions about time and space as viewed on the tube, the sheer sense of fun and gentle play that emanated from a Kovacs show, were wholly innovative then--and unmatched since (though the Monty Python troupe has come close)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
From the early 1950s until his tragic death at the age of 42 in 1962 in a car crash, Ernie Kovacs turned the small screen into his own personal TV funhouse of cerebral, goofy, eccentric and visually inventive comedy, most often working with his wife, singer-actress Edie Adams. His comedic influence can be felt in such later groundbreaking shows as "Monty Python's Flying Circus," "Laugh-In" and "Saturday Night Live. " Thanks to his late wife, who saved an enormous amount of Kovacs' TV work, Shout Factory!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angele Times Television Critic
At any given time, most things on television resemble other things on television, sharing narrative conventions and visual conceptions, techniques and technologies, even ways of treating and reflecting their audience. But there are always a few black sheep about, horses of a different color – artists who work against the system even as they operate within it and out of whatever combination of intention or helplessness create their own unaccountable realities. Two such other worlds get box-set video releases this month: "The Ernie Kovacs Collection" (Shout Factory, due April 19)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND and DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Television Academy Hall of Fame Sunday was to induct Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Leonard Goldenson, Jim Henson, Ernie Kovacs and Eric Sevareid during a ceremony taped for presentation Nov. 30 by Fox Broadcasting Co. The two-hour show will feature rare and vintage film chronicling the careers of the inductees, as well as tributes from such celebrities as Lucille Ball, Walter Cronkite, Phyllis Diller, Jack Lemon and David Wolper.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1987
The telecast of the American Comedy Awards show May 19 was humorous and interesting but omitted any recognition of Dick Shawn, who like Ernie Kovacs, Charlie Chaplin and Redd Foxx (none of whom was acknowledged either), was an original comedic presence and whose recent passing leaves quite a void. ABBY FRANKLIN Sherman Oaks
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