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Ernie Watts

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Watts' main appeal, a virile, emotionally charged attack, is showcased here with equally potent sidemen: drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Mulgrew Miller and acoustic bassist Charles Fambrough. The ploy works to a point as Watts powers his way through the title tune, John Coltrane's "Mr. Syms" and an upbeat "I Hear a Rhapsody" all driven by DeJohnette's tom-tom bombs and chattering snare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most musicians tilling the world of jazz for a living, saxophonist Ernie Watts never considered himself a stay-at-home type. Jazz, after all, is synonymous with travel. Yet, there were those years, which stretched into decades, when the versatile Watts, a Delaware native who made a splash in Buddy Rich's band, was sitting pretty in one spot--Los Angeles. As a member of the "Tonight Show" band under Doc Severinson's guidance, Watts, a first-call studio musician, was based in L.A.
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NEWS
October 1, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Zan Stewart is a regular contributor to The Times.
Saxophonist Ernie Watts sits in the Room Upstairs at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks, remembering the effect that the great saxophonist John Coltrane had on him as a youth in Wilmington, Del. "I had just started to play, and I would listen to 'Kind of Blue,' " Watts said in a musical voice, referring to the classic 1959 Miles Davis album that also featured Coltrane, saxophonist Cannonball Adderley and pianist Bill Evans, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Watts' main appeal, a virile, emotionally charged attack, is showcased here with equally potent sidemen: drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Mulgrew Miller and acoustic bassist Charles Fambrough. The ploy works to a point as Watts powers his way through the title tune, John Coltrane's "Mr. Syms" and an upbeat "I Hear a Rhapsody" all driven by DeJohnette's tom-tom bombs and chattering snare.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most musicians tilling the world of jazz for a living, saxophonist Ernie Watts never considered himself a stay-at-home type. Jazz, after all, is synonymous with travel. Yet, there were those years, which stretched into decades, when the versatile Watts, a Delaware native who made a splash in Buddy Rich's band, was sitting pretty in one spot--Los Angeles. As a member of the "Tonight Show" band under Doc Severinson's guidance, Watts, a first-call studio musician, was based in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
All-star bands in the jazz business are just like the seasons: They come, and then they go. These groups, assembled by promoters for the summer jazz-festival circuit in the United States, Europe and Japan, usually consist of a handful of name players who may or may not have played together before and who, more than likely, won't play together again. The Meeting is one group that runs counter to form.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
*** Ernie Watts, "Reaching Up," JVC. Watts' main appeal--a virile, emotionally charged attack--is showcased here with equally potent sidemen: drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Mulgrew Miller and acoustic bassist Charles Fambrough. The ploy works to a point as Watts powers his way through the title tune, John Coltrane's "Mr. Syms" and an upbeat "I Hear a Rhapsody," all driven by DeJohnette's tom-tom bombs and chattering snare.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Ernie Watts never ceases to amaze. Los Angeles' all-purpose saxophonist keeps turning up in new places, playing new music and making the most of every challenge. Friday night at Le Cafe he found a partnership--with pianist Peter Manning Robinson and bassist Joel DiBartolo--that stretched even Watts' considerably versatile skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1990 | A. JAMES LISKA
"I don't know what it is, but it's not jazz" were the words of caution firmly spoken by a member of the audience between sets Friday night at Le Cafe, where a drum-less trio fronted by saxophonist Ernie Watts began a two-night stint. The caution was overstated as Watts, pianist Peter Robinson and bassist Joel DiBartolo provided an impressive second set of original compositions that challenged the ear and stimulated the mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Time was when most leading jazz musicians had a particular job, as leader or sideman with a given band. Today the more typical artist is busy shuttling between gigs with an orchestra, playing in a small group, composing or teaching--or all four. Charlie Haden and Ernie Watts represent this current breed. They were recently at Catalina's in Hollywood as leader and featured soloist, respectively, with the group Quartet West.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
*** Ernie Watts, "Reaching Up," JVC. Watts' main appeal--a virile, emotionally charged attack--is showcased here with equally potent sidemen: drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Mulgrew Miller and acoustic bassist Charles Fambrough. The ploy works to a point as Watts powers his way through the title tune, John Coltrane's "Mr. Syms" and an upbeat "I Hear a Rhapsody," all driven by DeJohnette's tom-tom bombs and chattering snare.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Zan Stewart is a regular contributor to The Times.
Saxophonist Ernie Watts sits in the Room Upstairs at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks, remembering the effect that the great saxophonist John Coltrane had on him as a youth in Wilmington, Del. "I had just started to play, and I would listen to 'Kind of Blue,' " Watts said in a musical voice, referring to the classic 1959 Miles Davis album that also featured Coltrane, saxophonist Cannonball Adderley and pianist Bill Evans, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Ernie Watts never ceases to amaze. Los Angeles' all-purpose saxophonist keeps turning up in new places, playing new music and making the most of every challenge. Friday night at Le Cafe he found a partnership--with pianist Peter Manning Robinson and bassist Joel DiBartolo--that stretched even Watts' considerably versatile skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
All-star bands in the jazz business are just like the seasons: They come, and then they go. These groups, assembled by promoters for the summer jazz-festival circuit in the United States, Europe and Japan, usually consist of a handful of name players who may or may not have played together before and who, more than likely, won't play together again. The Meeting is one group that runs counter to form.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1990 | A. JAMES LISKA
"I don't know what it is, but it's not jazz" were the words of caution firmly spoken by a member of the audience between sets Friday night at Le Cafe, where a drum-less trio fronted by saxophonist Ernie Watts began a two-night stint. The caution was overstated as Watts, pianist Peter Robinson and bassist Joel DiBartolo provided an impressive second set of original compositions that challenged the ear and stimulated the mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Time was when most leading jazz musicians had a particular job, as leader or sideman with a given band. Today the more typical artist is busy shuttling between gigs with an orchestra, playing in a small group, composing or teaching--or all four. Charlie Haden and Ernie Watts represent this current breed. They were recently at Catalina's in Hollywood as leader and featured soloist, respectively, with the group Quartet West.
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