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Erudite

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1986
Your erudite correspondent, forced me to scurry to my lexicon to decipher his veritable volley of verbal venom. What a prolix protagonist of verbosity! He could simply have said: "I harbor an abhorrent aversion toward all Democrats" Period. HAL ELIAS Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Charles Rosen, the renowned pianist and prolific writer whose award-winning book "The Classical Style" has been read by music students around the world, has died. He was 85. The New York-born musician had been suffering from cancer and died Sunday evening at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, according to his London representative, Owen White International Artist Management. In his long career, Rosen combined a concert pianist's virtuosity with a well-rounded cultural erudition that made him a forceful and sometimes feared presence in New York's intellectual circles.
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TRAVEL
October 26, 1986
What a wonderfully erudite article Jerry wrote. I chose not to be "one of the thousands of Americans who canceled a trip to Europe last summer." Happy is the person who turns a dream into a reality. Sunday becomes a special day, simply because of the Travel Section, which regales me with places I have been or places I hope yet to traverse. MRS. R.J. LOSKILL Encinitas
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Sometimes you can't put your finger on what you've been missing until you encounter it again. After seeing two fine revivals of plays by Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter - "Waiting for Godot" at the Mark Taper Forum and the British production of "The Caretaker" at San Francisco's Curran Theatre, respectively - I suddenly realized how ravenous I was for language in the theater with poetic density and grit. Beckett, 20th century playwriting's No. 1 game-changer, and Pinter, his most original disciple, were writers steeped in literature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998
This reader's love of language was piqued by the vocabulary in Leonard Garment's entertaining essay (Opinion, March 8). Tumbrils of mots justes enervated my quotidian ennui. Dare I say words are his bag? The next day, moreover, your erudite editors roiled me with their description of Kate Winslet ("In Defense of the Appetizing Female," Commentary, March 9). My dictionary ("The Largest of Its Kind! The Most Entries--Over 74,000!") was verklemmt by zaftig! Keep up the good work--perhaps a glossary at the terminus of this section?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1987
Many thanks for Barry Bearak's article regarding Bush and his family. I had often wondered about Bush's background, but I had neglected to put forth the effort to satisfy my curiosity. Your reporter's excellent article was just what was needed. My views and respect for Bush are now in focus. He has his head screwed on right, and if the Republicans get theirs screwed on right and nominate him for President, I will certainly vote for this erudite and dedicated gentleman. He is a patriot who believes that the good of our country must take precedence over self-gratification.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992
Again our U.S. Congress has disappointed us. When our own Sen. (Alan) Cranston suggested a redesign of our monetary items, they have failed to see the underlying tactics of this very erudite request. I feel sure that he really wants to stimulate our economy. In addition to the added efforts of the Treasury, just think of all the extra labor all the banking institutions will expend. And then when you consider that Cranston really wants to change the size and shape of the coins and enlarge the currency, one can see that the slot machine manufacturers will get a big boost in redesigning all the machines to accommodate perhaps square coins and/or thicker, larger ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2009 | David C. Nichols; F. Kathleen Foley; Philip Brandes
Pertinent truth suffuses the self-lacerating literacy of "The Designated Mourner." Its implications are affecting and disturbing. Wallace Shawn's 1996 requiem for intellectual freedom as Western civilization implodes receives an incisive production by Son of Semele Ensemble. First staged at London's National Theatre by David Hare (who subsequently filmed it with originators Mike Nichols, Miranda Richardson and David de Keyser), "Mourner" takes an audacious path around its subversive precis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2008 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Literary and cultural critic John Leonard, an early champion of Toni Morrison, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and many other authors, and so consumed and so informed by books that Kurt Vonnegut once praised him as "the smartest man who ever lived," has died. He was 69. Leonard died Wednesday night at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City of complications from lung cancer, said his stepdaughter, Jen Nessel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
Bibliophiles, especially those inclined toward scanning other people's bookshelves, will find much to relish in Allen Ruppersberg's "The New Five Foot Shelf and Other New Projects," his fourth solo exhibition at the Margo Leavin Gallery. Language has long been a central preoccupation of this veteran Conceptualist, but in this recent work we see that interest zeroing in on books specifically -- both as physical objects, actual containers of language and as networks of ideas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John Stott did not fill stadiums with the faithful like his longtime friend, Billy Graham , or give the invocation at a presidential inauguration, as megachurch pastor Rick Warren did for Barack Obama. Yet he was a giant of the evangelical world — perhaps the most influential evangelist most people have never heard of. Unassuming but erudite, the Anglican pastor who died at 90 Wednesday in Surrey, England, after several months of deteriorating health, wrote 50 books, including the 1958 classic "Basic Christianity," which sold more than 2.5 million copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The works of man are many and wondrous, but if I had to pick one that most completely embodies the concept of the sublime, it probably would be the autumnal view from the terrace of Venice's Gritti Palace, across the Grand Canal, to the great church of Santa Maria della Salute ? though I'm not sure I ever could satisfactorily explain precisely why. In the long years of its decline and decay, Venice always has managed to evoke both the rhapsodic and the mysterious. Thus Evelyn Waugh has his Charles Ryder in " Brideshead Revisited," glimpsing it for the first time, muse: "This was my introduction to the baroque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Denis Dutton, a scholar, author and Internet trailblazer who founded Arts & Letters Daily , a pithy website that links thousands of devoted followers around the world to smart, provocative writing online about books, culture and ideas, died Tuesday in Christchurch, New Zealand, where he taught philosophy at Canterbury University. He was 66. The cause was complications of prostate cancer, said his brother, Doug, of the famous Dutton's Books family, which ran independent bookstores in Los Angeles for five decades.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
For decades, Jaguar traded in a sort of erudite tweediness, appealing to status-conscious epicureans who wanted to flaunt their success. With its latest model, Jaguar is hitting the brakes on its heritage focus and taking a U-turn toward the young and urban, not just the urbane. Shedding its Eton image for a style that's more Gen X and Jay-Z, Jag is trumpeting its newest car with an unprecedented array of sleek billboards and stylish TV spots. The three-month "City Takeover" looks to fuse the Jaguar brand with L.A.'s youthful energy and bare-all sexiness — a campaign that will soon roll in to New York and then Miami to continue the all-hours Jag party.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Tom Roston
Ask Michael Cera, the star of "Youth in Revolt," if he has lost his virginity, and he answers "Yes" before adding that good, if dusty, chestnut: "Now, I'm trying to get it back." Recycled jokes about lost virginity are a lot like movies that mine the humor of the same subject: Depending on the execution, they veer wildly between trite and funny. In the case of Cera's quip -- spoken with his halting, thoughtful, almost squeaky voice -- it falls solidly on the humorous side. With "Youth in Revolt," in theaters Friday, director Miguel Arteta ("The Good Girl")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2009 | David C. Nichols; F. Kathleen Foley; Philip Brandes
Pertinent truth suffuses the self-lacerating literacy of "The Designated Mourner." Its implications are affecting and disturbing. Wallace Shawn's 1996 requiem for intellectual freedom as Western civilization implodes receives an incisive production by Son of Semele Ensemble. First staged at London's National Theatre by David Hare (who subsequently filmed it with originators Mike Nichols, Miranda Richardson and David de Keyser), "Mourner" takes an audacious path around its subversive precis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2005 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Guy Mattison Davenport Jr., a writer known for erudite, highly original essays and short stories that he once described as "assemblages of history and necessary fiction" and whose unusual literary achievements earned him a MacArthur award, died Tuesday of cancer in Lexington, Ky. He was 77.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon, the violence and deception will begin. Ricky Jay will take the stage, produce the tools of his aged trade and shuffle them in a pair of small, fleshy hands. Queens will migrate. Aces will huddle in foursomes. Simple playing cards may spring to service as boomerangs or knives, sailing high above the stage or piercing a watermelon's hide at 10 paces. But for now, the hands are at rest. The magician, bearded and paunchy, sits in the front row of a dark and empty theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2008 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Literary and cultural critic John Leonard, an early champion of Toni Morrison, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and many other authors, and so consumed and so informed by books that Kurt Vonnegut once praised him as "the smartest man who ever lived," has died. He was 69. Leonard died Wednesday night at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City of complications from lung cancer, said his stepdaughter, Jen Nessel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Clad head to toe in skin-tight Johnny Cash black, Russell Brand mounted the stage at Hollywood's venerable rock venue the Roxy Theatre on a recent Sunday looking every inch the louche, preening British rock star of archetype. His haystack of "Edward Scissorhands"-esque hair: impressively vertical. His winkle-picker boots: pointy and sharp. Brand's shirt was unbuttoned nearly to his waist, revealing a cluster of silver Gypsy medallions as he looked up to face the capacity crowd.
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