Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsErvin Duggan
IN THE NEWS

Ervin Duggan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Following a six-month international search for a new leader, the board of directors of the Public Broadcasting Service on Wednesday selected Federal Communications Commissioner Ervin S. Duggan to become president of the non-commercial television network. Duggan, 54, becomes the fourth president of PBS, which employs about 350 people and has an operating budget of $161 million for fiscal 1994.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ervin S. Duggan, who shocked most in the public television arena when he resigned as president and CEO of PBS last month, said politics, pressure and cynicism led to a reluctant conclusion that after 5 1/2 years it was time for him to go. In his first public interview since his Sept.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan, making his debut Tuesday before the semi-annual gathering of the nation's television writers and critics, said he brought a message of "feistiness" and "optimism" about the non-commercial network he has headed for nearly six months. But he quickly ran into a barrage of questions that seemed to imply PBS was censoring controversial content.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan will propose at today's White House summit on children's programming the addition of an icon to highlight positive educational shows that would serve as a "welcome mat" to viewers. Speaking to television critics in Pasadena on Sunday, Duggan said he sees the icon as a supplement to the negative "warning" mechanism of the V-chip. V-chip technology, allowing parents to block programs labeled as violent, is scheduled to be introduced next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
'Can I go off the record? Can I tell you my fantasy?" PBS President Ervin S. Duggan suddenly says, barely waiting for an answer. "On the night before the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta," he unwinds slowly, "Falcon Stadium, there will be a magnificent concert, called--get this--'Night of the Divas,' and we will have . . . who has been left out in the tenors thing?" Women, obviously. Duggan is so taken with his idea that he readily agrees it can go on the record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
Describing public television as a "small and vulnerable institution" with "nothing to fight with but a sword called truth," PBS President Ervin S. Duggan on Wednesday urged the "broad center" of Americans who value public programming to let Congress know. No lobbying strategy "will be nearly as effective as the voices . . . and letters from people around the country. . . . It seems to me they should speak out," Duggan said to an audience of TV writers and critics in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan will propose at today's White House summit on children's programming the addition of an icon to highlight positive educational shows that would serve as a "welcome mat" to viewers. Speaking to television critics in Pasadena on Sunday, Duggan said he sees the icon as a supplement to the negative "warning" mechanism of the V-chip. V-chip technology, allowing parents to block programs labeled as violent, is scheduled to be introduced next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moves toward floor debate on an appropriation of $240 million for public broadcasting for fiscal 1998, PBS president and CEO Ervin S. Duggan sounded conciliatory and warily optimistic Wednesday. "We are feeling good about the ultimate survival of public television, and we feel the democratic process is working," he told about 70 reporters, critics and public TV officials on the closing day of the semiannual network press tour in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ervin S. Duggan, who shocked most in the public television arena when he resigned as president and CEO of PBS last month, said politics, pressure and cynicism led to a reluctant conclusion that after 5 1/2 years it was time for him to go. In his first public interview since his Sept.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Refuses to Suspend Rules on Cable Service, Rates: The Federal Communications Commission denied a bid by the cable TV industry to suspend new cable service and rate regulations scheduled to go into effect next month, but it granted a temporary delay to cable companies that serve 1,000 or fewer subscribers. FCC Commissioner Ervin Duggan said the delay will affect only 3.6% of the nation's cable subscribers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moves toward floor debate on an appropriation of $240 million for public broadcasting for fiscal 1998, PBS president and CEO Ervin S. Duggan sounded conciliatory and warily optimistic Wednesday. "We are feeling good about the ultimate survival of public television, and we feel the democratic process is working," he told about 70 reporters, critics and public TV officials on the closing day of the semiannual network press tour in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
Describing public television as a "small and vulnerable institution" with "nothing to fight with but a sword called truth," PBS President Ervin S. Duggan on Wednesday urged the "broad center" of Americans who value public programming to let Congress know. No lobbying strategy "will be nearly as effective as the voices . . . and letters from people around the country. . . . It seems to me they should speak out," Duggan said to an audience of TV writers and critics in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
'Can I go off the record? Can I tell you my fantasy?" PBS President Ervin S. Duggan suddenly says, barely waiting for an answer. "On the night before the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta," he unwinds slowly, "Falcon Stadium, there will be a magnificent concert, called--get this--'Night of the Divas,' and we will have . . . who has been left out in the tenors thing?" Women, obviously. Duggan is so taken with his idea that he readily agrees it can go on the record.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan, making his debut Tuesday before the semi-annual gathering of the nation's television writers and critics, said he brought a message of "feistiness" and "optimism" about the non-commercial network he has headed for nearly six months. But he quickly ran into a barrage of questions that seemed to imply PBS was censoring controversial content.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Following a six-month international search for a new leader, the board of directors of the Public Broadcasting Service on Wednesday selected Federal Communications Commissioner Ervin S. Duggan to become president of the non-commercial television network. Duggan, 54, becomes the fourth president of PBS, which employs about 350 people and has an operating budget of $161 million for fiscal 1994.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | Associated Press
Susan Ness, an investment banker specializing in communications companies, was nominated Tuesday by President Clinton to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission. Ness, 45, a communications attorney, was nominated for a Democratic seat on the five-member commission. The seat became available in February when Commissioner Ervin Duggan left to become head of the Public Broadcasting Service.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|