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Ervin S Duggan

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moves toward floor debate on an appropriation of $240 million for public broadcasting for fiscal 1998, PBS president and CEO Ervin S. Duggan sounded conciliatory and warily optimistic Wednesday. "We are feeling good about the ultimate survival of public television, and we feel the democratic process is working," he told about 70 reporters, critics and public TV officials on the closing day of the semiannual network press tour in Pasadena.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ervin S. Duggan, who shocked most in the public television arena when he resigned as president and CEO of PBS last month, said politics, pressure and cynicism led to a reluctant conclusion that after 5 1/2 years it was time for him to go. In his first public interview since his Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan, making his debut Tuesday before the semi-annual gathering of the nation's television writers and critics, said he brought a message of "feistiness" and "optimism" about the non-commercial network he has headed for nearly six months. But he quickly ran into a barrage of questions that seemed to imply PBS was censoring controversial content.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moves toward floor debate on an appropriation of $240 million for public broadcasting for fiscal 1998, PBS president and CEO Ervin S. Duggan sounded conciliatory and warily optimistic Wednesday. "We are feeling good about the ultimate survival of public television, and we feel the democratic process is working," he told about 70 reporters, critics and public TV officials on the closing day of the semiannual network press tour in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ervin S. Duggan, who shocked most in the public television arena when he resigned as president and CEO of PBS last month, said politics, pressure and cynicism led to a reluctant conclusion that after 5 1/2 years it was time for him to go. In his first public interview since his Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
'Can I go off the record? Can I tell you my fantasy?" PBS President Ervin S. Duggan suddenly says, barely waiting for an answer. "On the night before the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta," he unwinds slowly, "Falcon Stadium, there will be a magnificent concert, called--get this--'Night of the Divas,' and we will have . . . who has been left out in the tenors thing?" Women, obviously. Duggan is so taken with his idea that he readily agrees it can go on the record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
Describing public television as a "small and vulnerable institution" with "nothing to fight with but a sword called truth," PBS President Ervin S. Duggan on Wednesday urged the "broad center" of Americans who value public programming to let Congress know. No lobbying strategy "will be nearly as effective as the voices . . . and letters from people around the country. . . . It seems to me they should speak out," Duggan said to an audience of TV writers and critics in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1994
Ervin S. Duggan's Counterpunch, "Rosenberg Errs in PBS Criticism" (Nov. 7), takes TV critic Howard Rosenberg to task for challenging public television's priorities in providing air time for "Quiz Show" while refusing to fund or distribute Charlayne Hunter-Gault's acclaimed human rights series "Rights & Wrongs." The Public Broadcasting Service determined before we even went into production that, according to PBS programming chief Jennifer Lawson's now-infamous decision, human rights is an "insufficient organizing principle" for a series.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan will propose at today's White House summit on children's programming the addition of an icon to highlight positive educational shows that would serve as a "welcome mat" to viewers. Speaking to television critics in Pasadena on Sunday, Duggan said he sees the icon as a supplement to the negative "warning" mechanism of the V-chip. V-chip technology, allowing parents to block programs labeled as violent, is scheduled to be introduced next year.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday that it will not block Infinity Broadcasting Corp.'s bid to purchase a Los Angeles radio station despite repeated complaints about Infinity's off-color radio personality, Howard Stern. Instead, the agency voted 2 to 1 to seek another $400,000 in fines against Infinity for six alleged indecency violations by Stern but to grant Infinity's application for the broadcast license at KRTH-FM. New York-based Infinity is already contesting about $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
'Can I go off the record? Can I tell you my fantasy?" PBS President Ervin S. Duggan suddenly says, barely waiting for an answer. "On the night before the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta," he unwinds slowly, "Falcon Stadium, there will be a magnificent concert, called--get this--'Night of the Divas,' and we will have . . . who has been left out in the tenors thing?" Women, obviously. Duggan is so taken with his idea that he readily agrees it can go on the record.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS President Ervin S. Duggan, making his debut Tuesday before the semi-annual gathering of the nation's television writers and critics, said he brought a message of "feistiness" and "optimism" about the non-commercial network he has headed for nearly six months. But he quickly ran into a barrage of questions that seemed to imply PBS was censoring controversial content.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of foot-dragging over President Clinton's choice to head the Federal Communications Commission, the Senate has confirmed Washington antitrust lawyer Reed E. Hundt as the agency's new chairman. Hundt, a 45-year-old Washington lawyer nominated by Clinton on June 1, is scheduled to be sworn in next week in a ceremony presided over by former prep school classmate Vice President Al Gore. However, Clinton is not expected to fill the remaining FCC commissioner vacancy for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Encore! The Three Tenors," a hit with its audience at Dodger Stadium last Saturday, also performed mightily backstage--in the fund-raising rooms of public-television stations across the nation. No figure was available as to how much the program with Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras raised among PBS' 346 stations, but a survey of seven of the largest public-TV outlets found that more than $1.9 million has been pledged thus far.
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