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Erwin Schrodinger

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SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Maybe you thought it was some indecipherable math and a cat, but today's Google doodle is a playful birthday homage to Austrian physicist Erwin Schrodinger, a pioneer in quantum physics born on this day in 1877. For better or worse, popular memory of Schrodinger centers on his somewhat facetious 1935 thought experiment that brought a paradox of the Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics into the flesh-and-blood world. In it, a cat is obscured in a box with a radioactive device that could trigger a mechanical device leading to the feline's death by poisoning.
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SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Maybe you thought it was some indecipherable math and a cat, but today's Google doodle is a playful birthday homage to Austrian physicist Erwin Schrodinger, a pioneer in quantum physics born on this day in 1877. For better or worse, popular memory of Schrodinger centers on his somewhat facetious 1935 thought experiment that brought a paradox of the Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics into the flesh-and-blood world. In it, a cat is obscured in a box with a radioactive device that could trigger a mechanical device leading to the feline's death by poisoning.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Exactly 50 years ago, a Nobel laureate physicist published a tiny book whose title asked a simple question: "What Is Life?" Erwin Schrodinger, a creator of the quantum physics that was then leading the world inexorably toward the atomic bomb, wondered what role his science could play in explaining the nature of living things. "How can the events in space and time which take place within the spatial boundary of a living organism," he asked, "be accounted for by physics and chemistry?"
BUSINESS
July 7, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Exactly 50 years ago, a Nobel laureate physicist published a tiny book whose title asked a simple question: "What Is Life?" Erwin Schrodinger, a creator of the quantum physics that was then leading the world inexorably toward the atomic bomb, wondered what role his science could play in explaining the nature of living things. "How can the events in space and time which take place within the spatial boundary of a living organism," he asked, "be accounted for by physics and chemistry?"
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Isidor Isaac Rabi, the Nobel prize-winning physicist who played a key role in the wartime development of the atomic bomb and radar, died Monday after a long illness. Rabi, who had been associated with Columbia University for 65 years, was 89. Rabi's research explored the inner workings of the atom and the magnetic fields that control the subtle interactions of atomic particles.
OPINION
April 22, 2004 | Jeremy Bernstein
Today is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Julius Robert Oppenheimer. Julius was his father's name, but Oppenheimer never used it. He first signed letters Bob, then Robert, and to close friends he was known as Oppie or Opje. In later years, the name Julius appears mostly on his FBI documents. During the two years I was at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, from 1957 to 1959, I saw Oppenheimer, in one way or another, every day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Allen Barra
A good subtitle for "Newton's Football" might be "Pigskin Freakonomics. " This extraordinary collaboration between Allen St. John, columnist for Forbes.com and author of "The Billion Dollar Game," and Ainissa G. Ramirez, a PhD in materials science and engineering and author of "Save Our Science," aims at nothing less than "finding the common ground between Issac Newton and Vince Lombardi, between Bill Walsh and Erwin Schrodinger. " You might have thought that football coaches and scientists are such radically different species that they couldn't pass the salt at the dinner table without missing the connection.
BOOKS
November 3, 1985 | Gwen Yourgrau, Yourgrau is an editor in the Brain Research Institute at UCLA. and
Every morning, in major urban centers around the world, "perfectly normal people get up and go to their jobs and their work is torture." Former ambassador Robert White, quoted in "The Breaking of Minds and Bodies," ascribes this phenomenon to the institutionalization of political violence. "The Breaking of Minds and Bodies" denounces medical professionals who, as active participants or silent observers, perpetuate institutionalized torture. In "The Body in Pain," a more abstract, structuralist treatise, Elaine Scarry suggests that analysis of the institutionalization process itself is a necessary counteraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | Sara Lippincott, Lippincott is a freelance editor specializing in science.
The Strangest Man The Hidden Life of Paul Dirac, Mystic of the Atom Graham Farmelo Basic Books: 540 pp., $29.95 It's hard to imagine a more formidable subject for a biographer. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-84) was a pioneer of quantum theory in the 1920s and 1930s and fully as obscure and bizarre as that revolution in physics. He was hard to know and uninterested in being known. To most interlocutors, scientific and otherwise (if numerous anecdotes are to be believed)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
Maurice Wilkins, who played a critical role in discovering the structure of DNA but whose contributions were long overshadowed by James Watson and Francis Crick, died Tuesday at a London hospital. He was 88. The discovery of DNA's double helix structure -- considered one of the towering achievements of the 20th century and perhaps all of scientific history -- is key to understanding the primary genetic blueprint for life.
BOOKS
December 29, 1991 | Bettyann Kevles, Kevles is a frequent contributor to Book Review
Seven years after winning the Nobel Prize for elucidating the "uncertainty principle," a basis for the new quantum mechanics, physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976) was working night and day to provide Hitler with a nuclear chain reaction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Seymour Benzer, the Caltech biologist who made key findings about the structure and function of genes and pioneered research linking genes to behavior, died from a stroke Friday at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena. He was 86. Many of his colleagues felt that he should have been awarded a Nobel Prize for his achievements in elucidating the nature of genes and their links to everyday activities.
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