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MAGAZINE
January 17, 1988
Regarding "Esalen at 25," by Alice Kahn (Dec. 6): At Esalen in 1979, I, a skeptic, had my first psychic experience, leading to the development of latent healing powers. Call it magic or a high concentration of positive energy, Esalen definitely has it! SUSU LEVY Encino
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 5, 2012 | PATT MORRISON
Before the Esalen Institute, there was Michael Murphy's family's property, a choice chunk of gorgeous Big Sur, where, in 1962, Murphy (writer, seeker) and his fellow human potentialist Dick Price dedicated the Murphy land to the now 50-year-old center for personal and social consciousness-raising. Notables like Aldous Huxley, Abraham Maslow, Joan Baez and Henry Miller contemplated themselves and the world there. Esalen's scholarly social initiatives tend to get overlooked, while the touchy-feely stuff gets the attention.
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TRAVEL
January 29, 1995
It is interesting how two individuals--Barry Zwick ("Mind Bend," Weekend Escape, Jan. 1) and myself--whose ages and cultural backgrounds are about the same, can experience the same place in different ways. People from all over the world come to Esalen to discover how to better connect with others and to meet the challenge that life affords by applying the gained insights in a practical way. My wife and I have been to Esalen many times, and decided to take a workshop on massage for couples over the New Year's weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Larry Hagman, who as J.R. Ewing was famously shot but survived to finish 14 seasons and 357 episodes of "Dallas" and who rose again to lie and scheme in this year's successful revival, died Friday in Dallas, just down I-30 from Fort Worth, where he was born 81 years ago. The son of musical-comedy star Mary Martin, Hagman worked on the New York stage through the 1950s, on and off-Broadway, then moved into movie and TV roles. But it was as the star of "I Dream of Jeannie" that he first became widely known, a good-looking, dark-haired leading man in the mold of contemporaries like Jim Hutton and James Garner.
NEWS
August 14, 1988
I really take offense at Alice Kahn's column belittling the professionalism of licensed massage therapy ("Taming Fear of Massage: There's the Rub," July 31). Referring to these healing individuals as "not the most articulate people" reflects her limited exposure, if you will, to competent, well-versed therapists who do not parade nakedly around, as an Esalen environment might provide. I am physically handicapped. After numerous operations, physical therapy and years of limitations, my horizons have been expanded this year by massage therapy.
BOOKS
August 13, 1989
I think what Jack Miles said in "Slept Through Any Poetry Lately?" (Book Review, July 23) was that despite the current trend toward performance of literature, in general he favors the one-to-one relationship between reader and poem, novel, etc. If so, then I agree. I came away from this column, however, with sufficient ambivalence that I have to believe it reflects, at least in part, his own mixed feelings. Perhaps also my own. I disagree totally with the concept of a poem whose only merit lies in its recited performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Larry Hagman, who as J.R. Ewing was famously shot but survived to finish 14 seasons and 357 episodes of "Dallas" and who rose again to lie and scheme in this year's successful revival, died Friday in Dallas, just down I-30 from Fort Worth, where he was born 81 years ago. The son of musical-comedy star Mary Martin, Hagman worked on the New York stage through the 1950s, on and off-Broadway, then moved into movie and TV roles. But it was as the star of "I Dream of Jeannie" that he first became widely known, a good-looking, dark-haired leading man in the mold of contemporaries like Jim Hutton and James Garner.
NEWS
December 21, 1986
These are some recent programs that Esalen leaders hope will define the institute in the 1980s: Esalen each year sponsors 20 five-day conferences for scholars to explore political and scientific issues. Conferences have examined the psychology of Soviet-American relations, research in quantum theory physics and developments in evolutionary theory.
OPINION
December 5, 2012 | PATT MORRISON
Before the Esalen Institute, there was Michael Murphy's family's property, a choice chunk of gorgeous Big Sur, where, in 1962, Murphy (writer, seeker) and his fellow human potentialist Dick Price dedicated the Murphy land to the now 50-year-old center for personal and social consciousness-raising. Notables like Aldous Huxley, Abraham Maslow, Joan Baez and Henry Miller contemplated themselves and the world there. Esalen's scholarly social initiatives tend to get overlooked, while the touchy-feely stuff gets the attention.
MAGAZINE
December 6, 1987 | Alice Kahn
THE ESALEN catalogue is the best way to find out what the institute has to offer. You can acquire one by telephoning (408) 667-3000 or by writing to the Esalen Institute, Big Sur, Calif. 93920. A section in the front of the catalogue called "Ways of Being at Esalen" explains the options, from a visit to the hot springs (free to local residents between 1 and 5 a.m. weekdays) to a residency program that can cost several thousand dollars.
FOOD
March 1, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller, Special to the Los Angeles Times
- Morning fog weaves its way through colorful rows of vegetables, herbs and flowers as staff and apprentices gather at the center of the garden at Esalen Institute. It's 7 a.m. The freshly awakened faces sit calmly in a circle for a morning meditation, listening to the Pacific Ocean until the sound of chimes lets meandering minds know it's time to tend to the day's harvest. Bins of chard, arugula, parsley, radishes and carrots are picked, washed and delivered to the back door of the kitchen, roughly 1,250 feet from the field.
MAGAZINE
September 5, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Teresa Watanabe is a Times staff writer. Her last story for the magazine was about her grandfather's imprisonment during WWII
In an emerald expanse of California's majestic Central Coast, a series of intense human explorations are underway. In a large white yurt, several yogis are breathing, bending and meditating to deepen awareness of their Divine Inner Self. Next door, artists are painting doves, dolphins and goddesses as they create mandalas, an ancient symbol of the psyche, in search of self-understanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | Brett Brune, Times Staff Writer
The Monologuist is dead. Long live the Monologuist! Spalding Gray, the king of modern storytelling, deserves such a send-off. As his closest friends prepare to gather Saturday in Sag Harbor, N.Y., for his final memorial service, those of us who affectionately remember his work on the West Coast must also pay homage to the lone wolf howling out the truth that was Gray on stage. I remember his work well, from the perspective of a student at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur in the spring of 1993.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002 | Jane Engle
Goodbye, funky redwood tubs. Hello, $6-million bathhouse. Esalen Institute, the 40-year-old New Age retreat in Big Sur known for its seminars, massages and hot mineral springs, has reopened its cliff-side baths in a new stone-and-concrete structure. The original baths, in a building that dated to the 1930s, were destroyed four years ago by a storm-driven landslide. Three redwood hot tubs were used in the interim.
TRAVEL
June 7, 1998
Looking to stay at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur? Now's the time because bookings are down 25% at the "human potential" center, which draws 10,000 people a year to its hot tubs, massages and seminars. Even Fourth of July weekend, normally booked months ahead, has room. Esalen reopened in May after being shut down since Feb. 3 by El Nin~o storms, which wrecked its bathhouse and damaged some quarters.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1996 | Paul Lieberman, Paul Lieberman is a Times staff writer. His last piece for the magazine was on a Mafia strong-arm crew
Here's how my 5-iron wound up among the naked tai chi people on the first full day of the "Golf in the Kingdom" workshop: Our guru-pro, Fred Shoemaker, sets up a cage on the main lawn of the Esalen Institute so we can throw clubs into it. Oh, we hit a few balls first so he can videotape our normal swings. But the idea is to learn how much better we look when we LET GO. So Fred tells us to fling one club after another at a bull's-eye on the back of the cage. Just fling 'em. Let 'em go.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1985
Richard Price, a co-founder of "the gymnasium of the mind" known as Esalen, has died after a fall while hiking in Hot Springs Canyon near the Big Sur institute. He was 55. In 1962, Price and former Stanford classmate Michael Murphy founded the institute "to explore human potentialities and personal and social development," Murphy said.
TRAVEL
January 29, 1995
It is interesting how two individuals--Barry Zwick ("Mind Bend," Weekend Escape, Jan. 1) and myself--whose ages and cultural backgrounds are about the same, can experience the same place in different ways. People from all over the world come to Esalen to discover how to better connect with others and to meet the challenge that life affords by applying the gained insights in a practical way. My wife and I have been to Esalen many times, and decided to take a workshop on massage for couples over the New Year's weekend.
TRAVEL
January 1, 1995 | BARRY ZWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Zwick is a Times assistant news editor
In the '60s, I grew to manhood, moved to California and learned what my sign is. I picked up new words, such as karma, mantra, chakra and ashram. I heard wondrous tales of a magical retreat on a bluff over the Pacific, a place where I might find George and Ringo and Ravi and the Maharishi. And then I heard something just awful, just disgusting. There were middle-age people there, and they ran around naked. Turned my stomach.
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