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Escalates

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992
State inspectors on Monday examined an escalator at the Broadway department store that malfunctioned over the weekend but found no clues as to why it broke down. Inspectors gave the store permission to operate the escalator again, said Bill Dombrowski, spokesman for Carter Hawley Hale Stores Inc., owners of the Broadway. "Everybody checked the escalator and we couldn't find anything wrong with it," Dombrowski said. "I don't want to speculate about what happened.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) has demanded that the National Endowment for the Arts turn over to him a set of transparencies of every image in an exhibition of work by the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. In a series of requests for material from the endowment made this week, The Times has learned, Helms also sought financial records pertaining to the $90,000 in annual NEA grant funding to the Washington Project for the Arts. WPA, as the organization is known, is attempting to host a show of Mapplethorpe's work after cancellation of the exhibit by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, another Washington museum, last week.
NEWS
May 2, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista government Wednesday decried Washington's planned embargo on U.S.-Nicaraguan trade as "a new escalation of aggression" in the war it said the Reagan Administration "has declared against the people of Nicaragua." Vice President Sergio Ramirez said the embargo is aimed at destroying the Sandinista revolution and will seriously affect the national economy. But Ramirez insisted that the revolution will not be jeopardized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A toddler who was badly injured when his clothing became stuck in an escalator was in stable condition Thursday and "doing a lot better," his mother said. Cody Carter, who will be 3 years old in two weeks, was removed from the intensive care unit and moved into a private room at Western Medical Center-Santa Ana six days after his shorts were snagged in an escalator at MainPlace mall in Santa Ana. Cody sustained cuts to his stomach, legs and groin.
OPINION
November 1, 2003
Re "Shop Smart, Students," editorial, Oct. 28: This month, the California Public Interest Research Group student chapters at UCLA and Berkeley conducted a survey of students that found that students spent an average of $350 on textbooks for the fall 2003 quarter, with the most expensive books costing up to $125. However, I take issue with your editorial's conclusion, which implies that the burden lies on students, not textbook companies, to lower book costs. There is increasingly compelling evidence that textbook companies practice "planned obsolescence" with their books, replacing perfectly usable textbook editions with expensive new editions that have no significant content differences except minor changes in page numbering and chapter order.
SPORTS
December 31, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A major safety switch was missing from an escalator when it malfunctioned at Coors Field last summer, injuring dozens of baseball fans, city inspectors in Denver said Tuesday. City inspectors said the switch would have prevented the escalator from hurtling out of control July 2. The device was there when the escalator was originally certified, and contractors said they inspected it in March, according to Julius Zsako, spokesman for the city Community Planning and Development Office.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2005 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The outlook for Chiron Corp.'s flu vaccine business worsened Wednesday when the company said it would ship no vaccine from a troubled German factory. The announcement came five days after Chiron slashed production at the Marburg plant after finding bacteria in some vaccine. On Wall Street, the latest round of bad news fueled uncertainty about Chiron's ability to supply vaccine to the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1985
Recent reports from El Salvador indicate that government forces have begun to escalate the level of fighting in the civil war, with encouragement from the Reagan Administration. Peace will come to that country only with a balanced approach that holds guerrilla forces at bay long enough to bargain them back into the constitutional system. But the new tilt toward a military solution threatens that balance. U.S.
WORLD
September 28, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Some of the fiercest clashes in weeks in the Syrian city of Aleppo were reported Friday as rebels said they were pressing a "decisive" battle for the besieged northern metropolis. As night fell, it was unclear whether either side had made any substantial advances in the city, which has been divided between government and opposition forces for more than two months. The battle had evolved into a brutal war of attrition until Friday's surge in urban combat. There was no overall casualty count from Friday's clashes in Aleppo, Syria's most populous city and its commercial hub. Hundreds of thousands of people have fled the city and the once-vibrant economy has ground to a halt since fighting broke out in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Lindsay Barnett
"The man with the pork-pie hat caught my eye," David Patrick Valera says of the inspiration for this photo, taken at the Los Angeles Central Library in February.  Valera used an Olympus OM-D EM-5 camera with a Panasonic 50mm Summilux f/1.4 lens. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our Flickr page or reader submission gallery . Follow us on Twitter or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments for more on this photo series.
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