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Eskimos Canada

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NEWS
December 18, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The likely creation of a huge new Arctic territory for Eskimos marks a watershed in Canada's efforts to address the many longstanding grievances of its native peoples. But the prospect of the new realm has pitted Canada's various aboriginal peoples one against the other, as they argue over how best to achieve their ultimate goal: self-government.
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NEWS
December 18, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The likely creation of a huge new Arctic territory for Eskimos marks a watershed in Canada's efforts to address the many longstanding grievances of its native peoples. But the prospect of the new realm has pitted Canada's various aboriginal peoples one against the other, as they argue over how best to achieve their ultimate goal: self-government.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes, collecting movies is not quite enough. There are also those special TV shows from the past that are worth treasuring for repeated viewings. Such is the case with "The Disneyland Anthology," a box set of six episodes from the classic television series, released on laserdisc by Image. Perhaps the most memorable moments on those shows were the introductions by none other than Walt Disney.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Moses Kasarnak crouched over the hole in the ice where the seals come up for air. He had been standing silently for nearly half an hour in a hunched position, knees bent just so, clasping his rifle in both hands, squinting through the top of wire-rim bifocals at the finger-sized opening in the small ice dome at his feet. Seals breathe air, just like people. Kasarnak must not move or make a sound, or they will know he is there. From far away comes a muffled drone.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | JEFFREY ULBRICH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 1,000 Eskimos of Canada's volunteer Arctic Rangers, armed with World War I rifles and a toll-free telephone number, are the first northern line of defense. Spread out across the vast emptiness of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and northern Quebec, the Rangers are "the eyes and ears of the North," said a military policy maker. While Rangers hunt on the tundra and along Canada's frigid coasts, as Eskimos have for centuries, they keep an eye peeled for suspicious or unusual activity.
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