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Eskimos

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997 | DAVID GERMAIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In winter, the earth is frozen solid. In summer, it is one of the marshiest places in North America. For the Nuiqsut Eskimos, this barren coastline that is freezing even on days the sun never sets is where they have hunted caribou, geese and whales for generations. But it is also where North Slope oil drillers believe an estimated 1 billion barrels worth of oil can be found below the tundra. Thomas Napageak knows this, and he is worried.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 1996 | JEAN PAGEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eskimo Joe has come of age. The big-grinning mascot who debuted 21 years ago along with his namesake, Stillwater's famed hangout, is now more than just another logo. He has his own empire. "Vote Joe for President" buttons are making the rounds. Eskimo Joe's also has new prepaid telephone cards through MCI. Stillwater National Bank counts 1,168 Visas and MasterCards imprinted with the notoriously happy cartoon face.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Industrial espionage is dependably dandy as the premise for a script, especially when skulduggery is set in the glamorous world of beauty. Hard to believe that miracle formulas are sometimes poached in the real life too, where corporate attorneys don't necessarily look like refugees from "Central Park West," spies aren't as fetching as Julia Roberts, and Angela Lansbury doesn't shame the culprit into a confession in the end.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
A vote in favor of lifting a yearlong alcohol prohibition in Barrow, Alaska, has been certified, but some Inupiat Eskimo leaders say they may file a federal complaint to upend the results. The Oct. 3 vote underscored racial divisions in Barrow, where non-Eskimos organized to end the liquor ban and some Eskimo leaders who say alcohol has harmed their culture worked to retain it.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A flatbed truck with 13 cardboard boxes recently pulled up at the loading dock behind the University of Alaska's museum--the next-to-the-last stop on a long, curious odyssey. The boxes contained all that is left of about 150 prehistoric Eskimos who hunted walrus and seals on a desolate chunk of rock in the Arctic Ocean at least 1,500 years ago. Their homeland is only 40 miles off the coast of Siberia, but it now belongs to the United States. Their trip back to St.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | From Reuters
Trapper Sandy Stefannson proudly displays the lush pelts of a lynx and fox he caught in the Arctic wilderness and remembers when furs like these would have brought him top dollar. Those days, he says, are long gone. Stefannson, like other native Indian and Eskimo trappers in Canada's north, is struggling to survive in the face of depressed fur prices and anti-fur protests by animal rights groups. "In the last few years, fur prices go down and down. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1993 | SAMUEL PERRY, REUTERS
Oil has helped bring Alaska's Inupiat Eskimos into the modern world, but they fear it may harm the bowhead whales at the center of their ancient culture. Since oil was discovered in Prudhoe Bay in 1968 it has brought a bonanza of untold riches to this village on the edge of the Arctic Ocean, turning the North Slope Borough into one of the wealthiest per capita local districts in the country.
FOOD
May 13, 1993 | CHARLES PERRY
Delicious Cookie Co. sandwiches two shortbread cookies around peanut butter and jelly for Skippy & Welch's Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich Cookie. And Tootsie Rolls and Eskimo Pie are collaborating on Tootsie Pops, where Tootsie Rolls are surrounded by orange, cherry or grape-flavored ice shells. Crunch Quandary Now you can buy Nestle's Crunch bars molded with the words "It's Crunch Time" and one of 27 NBA basketball team logos.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | From Reuters
The U.S. government subjected more than 100 Alaskan villagers to radioactive drugs in the 1950s as part of a medical experiment to find out whether soldiers could better survive in Arctic conditions, Cable News Network reported Monday. The CNN special report said doctors hired by the U.S. military gave pills containing small doses of iodine to 102 Eskimos and Indians to measure its effect on their thyroid glands. The report said the doctors did not explain to the Alaskans what they were doing.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cold War is over, as anyone with the price of a newspaper knows. The Soviet bogey of the East-West power pageant is stuffed and denatured, nearly a museum piece. Canada, a nation that novelist Mordecai Richler regards as "one of history's couch potatoes," is wise to all this. It is calling home its troops from Europe. Certainly no one in this kinder, gentler age is about to attack an international good guy like Canada.
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