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Esmeralda Santiago

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October 25, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
THE WAY WINTER COMES. By Sherry Simpson (Sasquatch Books: 164 pp., $19.95) Once in a great while, even this foreigner gets an inkling that she is reading something truly Western, truly indigenous. These are the books that could be read anywhere, because their roots go so deep into Western soil that they join the other strong, place-inspired literatures at the molten canon in the Earth's core. Read these stories in New York and you can still be stung by the wind off the tundra.
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September 26, 2004 | Yxta Maya Murray, Yxta Maya Murray is a professor of law at Loyola Law School and the author of several novels, including "The Conquest" and the forthcoming "The Queen Jade."
We are each of us a secret Odysseus; we want to craft our lives into the Big Adventure. And yet, that's an easy ambition to give up between the first love affair and the sixth, or during the everlasting commute to work. Wasn't Casanova busy escaping from the Inquisition at my age, instead of slinging frozen yogurt, someone in his early 20s might think with a twinge that pinches a major nerve. Wasn't St.
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NEWS
December 14, 1998 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turn of phrase "being in the moment," though overused by the overwrought, feels custom-fit for memoirist Esmeralda Santiago, who summons her powers of concentration, detail and memory as both deflection and map to guide her through the most chaotic, dizzying spots of a life that refuses to stand in one place.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turn of phrase "being in the moment," though overused by the overwrought, feels custom-fit for memoirist Esmeralda Santiago, who summons her powers of concentration, detail and memory as both deflection and map to guide her through the most chaotic, dizzying spots of a life that refuses to stand in one place.
BOOKS
September 26, 2004 | Yxta Maya Murray, Yxta Maya Murray is a professor of law at Loyola Law School and the author of several novels, including "The Conquest" and the forthcoming "The Queen Jade."
We are each of us a secret Odysseus; we want to craft our lives into the Big Adventure. And yet, that's an easy ambition to give up between the first love affair and the sixth, or during the everlasting commute to work. Wasn't Casanova busy escaping from the Inquisition at my age, instead of slinging frozen yogurt, someone in his early 20s might think with a twinge that pinches a major nerve. Wasn't St.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | Yvonne V. Sapia, Yvonne V. Sapia is a Puerto Rican American who received the Nilon Award for Excellence in Minority Fiction for her novel "Valentino's Hair."
Stylistically fluid and finely detailed, "When I Was Puerto Rican" by Esmeralda Santiago takes its unique place in contemporary Latino storytelling. Santiago's autobiographical account cinematically recaptures her past and her island culture in a manner most appropriate for Santiago who, according to the author's note, is president of her own film company.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997
Theresa Bonpane, executive director, Office of the Americas: "Alias Grace" by Margaret Atwood (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday) "This book is great. It's very interestingly written. It shows how the main character survived. The documentation of the true story is woven throughout. The basic story is factual." **** Rene Cardenas, Spanish-language play-by-play announcer, Los Angeles Dodgers: The poetry of Ruben Dario "I like the way he writes. He's so different.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If in general it's better to give than receive, the rule ought to hold true for books -- and giving is the basis of World Book Night, in which millions of books are distributed, for free, by willing volunteers. World Book Night launched in Britain and Ireland in 2011 and came to the U.S. (and Germany) for the first time in 2012. It's on April 23, which is known as Shakespeare's birthday, the day both he and Miguel de Cervantes died, and UNESCO's International Day of the Book.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A spirited young Puerto Rican girl moves to Brooklyn, where "Hispanic" as a one-size-fits-all label is just one more unexpected barrier to overcome in her determined struggle to find herself, in PBS' warm and unaffected adaptation of Esmeralda Santiago's coming-of-age memoir, "Almost a Woman." This newest offering from "Masterpiece Theatre's American Collection" airs Sunday at 8 p.m., an hour earlier than usual, to be more accessible for family viewing.
BOOKS
April 7, 1996
The first Los Angeles Times Festival of Books will be held April 20 and 21 at UCLA's Dickson Plaza. Admission is free; parking at UCLA is $5. Times are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on April 20 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 21. A full schedule of events, ranging from author panels to children's book and poetry readings, will appear in a special section in The Times on Sunday, April 14.
BOOKS
October 25, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
THE WAY WINTER COMES. By Sherry Simpson (Sasquatch Books: 164 pp., $19.95) Once in a great while, even this foreigner gets an inkling that she is reading something truly Western, truly indigenous. These are the books that could be read anywhere, because their roots go so deep into Western soil that they join the other strong, place-inspired literatures at the molten canon in the Earth's core. Read these stories in New York and you can still be stung by the wind off the tundra.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | Yvonne V. Sapia, Yvonne V. Sapia is a Puerto Rican American who received the Nilon Award for Excellence in Minority Fiction for her novel "Valentino's Hair."
Stylistically fluid and finely detailed, "When I Was Puerto Rican" by Esmeralda Santiago takes its unique place in contemporary Latino storytelling. Santiago's autobiographical account cinematically recaptures her past and her island culture in a manner most appropriate for Santiago who, according to the author's note, is president of her own film company.
BOOKS
January 22, 1995 | SUZANNE CURLEY
The greatest wizard of them all continues to inspire. Merlin, the magician contemporary with King Arthur, makes his latest appearance in The Merlin Effect, by T. A. Barron (Philomel: $16.95; ages 10-14). Barron--whom critics compare to Madeleine L'Engle and C. S. Lewis-is the author of two previous fantasy novels, "Heartlight" and "The Ancient One," to which this latest book is a companion.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | KIM CAMPBELL, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
When the 1993 Spanish edition of Laura Esquivel's novel "Like Water for Chocolate" unexpectedly sold thousands of copies in a matter of months, it was the incentive many United States publishers needed to tap into the Latino market. By expanding their Spanish-language offerings, or creating whole new lines devoted to such books, a handful of New York's top publishing houses hope to appeal to the more than 26-million Latinos living in the United States.
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