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Eso Won Bookstore

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NEWS
October 21, 1990
We are distraught, angered and unable to begin planning for the 1991 African Marketplace and Cultural Faire as a result of the controversy created by Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's criticism of the sale of two anti-Semitic books at this year's event (Times, Oct. 14). The uproar threatens an event that has been heralded as a love-in not only by Southern California residents and tourists, but by would-be imitators all over this country. The African Marketplace is the most successful of all city-sponsored festivals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2007 | John L. Mitchell, Times Staff Writer
When President Bill Clinton flew into town in 2004 and needed a spot to sit for a few hours and sign a few hundred books, he chose Eso Won bookstore. Sen. Barack Obama and singer Patti Labelle have signed their books in the same store. Eso Won has grown famous by hosting book-signings by nationally recognized figures and entertainers seeking to pitch memoirs, but it hasn't grown prosperous.
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NEWS
February 6, 1995 | ERIN AUBRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is Tuesday night, but Michael Eric Dyson is holding forth as if it were Sunday morning. The author, professor and minister strikes the podium at Eso Won Bookstore like a pulpit to emphasize points extracted from "Making Malcolm," his new book on the cultural impact of Malcolm X.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Fugate and Tom Hamilton are demolition experts. For the better part of a decade, they have been about the business of demolishing the myth that black people don't buy books. Their Eso Won bookstore on North La Brea Avenue in Inglewood has become one of the foremost cultural centers in Southern California's black community, and it is an obligatory and profitable stop for virtually every black author on a book tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Fugate and Tom Hamilton are demolition experts. For the better part of a decade, they have been about the business of demolishing the myth that black people don't buy books. Their Eso Won bookstore on North La Brea Avenue in Inglewood has become one of the foremost cultural centers in Southern California's black community, and it is an obligatory and profitable stop for virtually every black author on a book tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2007 | John L. Mitchell, Times Staff Writer
When President Bill Clinton flew into town in 2004 and needed a spot to sit for a few hours and sign a few hundred books, he chose Eso Won bookstore. Sen. Barack Obama and singer Patti Labelle have signed their books in the same store. Eso Won has grown famous by hosting book-signings by nationally recognized figures and entertainers seeking to pitch memoirs, but it hasn't grown prosperous.
NEWS
June 14, 1999
Re "Question of Class" by Lynell George, May 10: One of the nicer things about the true upper class, black or otherwise, is its total lack of self-consciousness. The genuine product doesn't need to defend itself in a gratuitous volume of 400-plus pages ("Our Kind of People," by Lawrence Otis Graham), then defend itself and the book in open forum. Those who are truly of that class are at ease with themselves; therefore, the rest of the world is at ease with them. The Eso Won Bookstore debate-discussion would be declasse.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS
In the hustle and bustle of life, when was the last time you felt truly happy? When Earthlyn Marselean Manuel was asked that question, she cried when she realized her answer: as a child, strolling through the neighborhood with her dog. An L.A. native and present-day Oakland resident, Manuel decided she needed a revival of the soul. Drawing from the experiences of African American women, she came up with "Black Angel Cards: A Soul Revival Guide for Black Women."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010
The Movie That Inspired Me David Fincher, celebrated director of "Fight Club" and "Zodiac," presents George Roy Hill's William Goldman-scripted "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" in this month's installment of the UCLA Film and Television Archive series. Post-screening, Fincher and series host Curtis Hanson will discuss the lighthearted 1969 chronicle of the notorious leaders of the Hole-in-the-Wall Gang. Billy Wilder Theatre, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. 7:30 p.m. $9. (310) 206-3456. cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2010
BOOKS Terry McMillan In her 1992 breakout bestseller, "Waiting to Exhale," Terry McMillan celebrated the power of female bonding, long before "Sex and the City" was but a twinkle in Darren Star's eye. The author has returned to Savannah, Gloria, Robin and Bernandine, now navigating life in their 50s, for her sequel, "Getting to Happy. " Eso Won Bookstore, 4331 Degnan Blvd., L.A. 7 p.m. Also, Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. 7 p.m. Wed. MOVIES "Take 100: The Future of Film" A panel discussion featuring the Duplass brothers ("Cyrus")
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | ERIN AUBRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is Tuesday night, but Michael Eric Dyson is holding forth as if it were Sunday morning. The author, professor and minister strikes the podium at Eso Won Bookstore like a pulpit to emphasize points extracted from "Making Malcolm," his new book on the cultural impact of Malcolm X.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
We are distraught, angered and unable to begin planning for the 1991 African Marketplace and Cultural Faire as a result of the controversy created by Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's criticism of the sale of two anti-Semitic books at this year's event (Times, Oct. 14). The uproar threatens an event that has been heralded as a love-in not only by Southern California residents and tourists, but by would-be imitators all over this country. The African Marketplace is the most successful of all city-sponsored festivals.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In response to the recent criticism about the sale of two anti-Semitic books at a city-sponsored festival last month, the Cultural Affairs Department has set new guidelines designed to discourage the sale of such offensive materials at publicly funded events. Adolfo V.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharply worded letter to the head of the city's Cultural Affairs Department, City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky criticized the sale of two anti-Semitic books by a vendor at last month's city-sponsored African Marketplace. Yaroslavsky's two-page letter asked Adolfo Nodal, cultural affairs general manager, to come up with ways to prevent or discourage the future sale of such offensive materials at publicly funded events.
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