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Esophageal Cancer

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NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Writer Christopher Hitchens, 62, died Thursday of pneumonia, a complication of the esophageal cancer he battled for more than a year. Hitchens was best known for his essays about politics and faith.  An atheist, he famously debated religion with practicing Christians, including former British Prime Minister Tony Blair and National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins. But in the last year of his life he also distinguished himself by writing about his cancer, penning a National Magazine Award-winning series of columns for the magazine Vanity Fair.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 19, 2013
Re "Prescribing silence," Opinion, May 16 That Dr. Susan Partovi asked a patient if he wanted to know the details of his terminal illness is commendable. But relying on the old standby, "Do you want everything done?" - not so much. The medical team has a responsibility to thoughtfully and compassionately explore both the benefits and burdens of end-of-life treatment options, many of which can lead to suffering, reduce quality of life and impede a peaceful death. As prognosis worsens, patients and families commonly fear abandonment and may choose aggressive intervention to ensure ongoing contact and care.
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NEWS
September 3, 2010
The family of bone-building drugs that includes Fosamax, Actonel and Boniva can double the risk of developing throat cancer, researchers reported Thursday in the latest development in what has become a confusing discussion. Other studies have reported no increase, but even if the newest finding is correct, the risk is still quite small--about two cases per 1,000 people between age 60 and 79, compared with the normal risk of one case in the same group. The drugs belong to a family called oral bisphosphonates, which were first marketed in the mid-1990s.
OPINION
May 16, 2013 | By Susan Partovi
His wife was a patient at the clinic where I worked in my early days as a doctor. I saw her regularly for hypertension. But on one visit, she was more concerned about her husband - let's call him Pedro. He was having stomach pains and difficulty swallowing. I told her to make an appointment for him with me. When I saw him, Pedro explained that he had lost weight and was having trouble swallowing solid food. A barium swallow study confirmed my fears: He had esophageal cancer. Another doctor at the clinic received the report before I saw Pedro again and made an urgent referral to surgery.
HEALTH
April 10, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Heartburn, that almost quintessential American medical malady, now appears to be driving the nation's fastest-increasing type of cancer. And the antacids used to ease the symptoms could, in some cases, do more harm than good. The cancer, a type of esophageal disease called adenocarcinoma, is relatively rare. However, incidence has jumped sixfold in the last 30 years. No one knows exactly why esophageal cancer is on the rise, but experts say heartburn is the natural suspect.
SCIENCE
March 28, 2009 | Karen Kaplan
Is there anything left in life that isn't linked in some way to cancer? Not hot tea apparently. An international group of scientists has now connected it with esophageal cancer. The problem doesn't appear to be the tea itself, but the temperature at which it is consumed, their study found. Residents of Golestan province in northern Iran have one of the highest rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Richard Dawson, the “Hogan's Heroes” actor and original “Family Feud” host who died Saturday from complications of esophageal cancer, learned of his diagnosis only three weeks before his death, according to his children. “Luckily, he didn't have to go through all the bad treatments and stuff,” son Gary told “Access Hollywood” on Monday, elaborating on a comment made to The Times over the weekend. “He had a heart attack and went in the hospital. He was actually going in for his first radiation treatment when he had a heart attack.” Daughter Shannon said there were no signs before the diagnosis.
HEALTH
January 24, 2005 | From Reuters
Black esophageal cancer patients in the United States are half as likely as whites to get surgery that can help them live longer and often do not even see a surgeon, researchers have found. Only 25% of black American patients studied underwent surgery that can cure this form of cancer in some cases, compared with 46% of white patients, said the researchers in the United States and the Netherlands.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
One type of cancer of the esophagus has increased more than 350% among white men in the last 20 years, and researchers say the reasons may include smoking and an increase in obesity. The study, published in the journal Cancer, reported that annual cases of adenocarcinoma rose from 0.7 cases per 100,000 in 1974-76 to 3.2 cases per 100,000 in 1992-94. Nearly 90% of patients with esophageal cancer die within five years of contracting the disease.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
Two recent reports have linked the osteoporosis drug alendronate (Fosamax) with rare but serious side effects. In a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine published Jan. 1, a Food and Drug Administration official reported that since Fosamax was first marketed in 1995, 23 cases of esophageal cancer in patients taking the drug -- including eight deaths -- have been reported to the agency. And a USC study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dental Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013
Deke Richards, 68, who as part of the songwriting and producing team known as the Corporation was responsible for many of the Jackson 5's early hit songs for Motown Records, died Sunday at a hospice in Bellingham, Wash., of esophageal cancer, according to a statement from the Universal Music record label. Richards and the other members of the Corporation -- Alphonso Mizell, Freddie Perren and Motown founder Berry Gordy -- created and shaped the Jacksons' first three No. 1 hits: "I Want You Back," "ABC" and "The Love You Save.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
Emily Rapp is not one to sugarcoat hard truths, including the brutal diagnosis she and her husband received in January 2011 when they took their then-9-month-old son to a pediatric ophthalmologist because of concerns about developmental delays. Ronan, they were told, had Tay-Sachs disease, which was untreatable and always fatal, usually by age 3. How do you live with such a death sentence? In "The Still Point of the Turning World," Rapp describes forcing herself to think deeply about the unthinkable and adjust to a new reality as she steels herself for inevitable, devastating loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 30 - Oct. 6 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     This Morning Bobbi Brown; Craig Ferguson. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Cher Lloyd performs; Anna Kendrick. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Margaret Cuomo; Chris Powell; Pamela Peeke. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Chace Crawford; Mindy Kaling. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Ethan Hawke; Lewis Black; Jackie Evancho; L.A. Reid.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Mortality Christopher Hitchens Twelve: 104 pp., $22.99 For all that literature is an art of self-exposure, writers tend to back away from impending death. The shelf of firsthand looks at what Janet Hobhouse called "this dying business" is a short one - Hobhouse's searing posthumous novel "The Furies"; Raymond Carver's final collection of poetry, "A New Path to the Waterfall"; John Updike's "Endpoint and Other Poems. " I'm not sure why this is, exactly, other than that dying is a lot of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Richard Dawson, the “Hogan's Heroes” actor and original “Family Feud” host who died Saturday from complications of esophageal cancer, learned of his diagnosis only three weeks before his death, according to his children. “Luckily, he didn't have to go through all the bad treatments and stuff,” son Gary told “Access Hollywood” on Monday, elaborating on a comment made to The Times over the weekend. “He had a heart attack and went in the hospital. He was actually going in for his first radiation treatment when he had a heart attack.” Daughter Shannon said there were no signs before the diagnosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I met Christopher Hitchens only once. It was in 2007, at BookExpo America, the publishing industry trade show, where we both were on a panel about the ethics of book reviewing. Hitchens, who died Thursday of esophageal cancer at age 62, dismissed the very premise of the discussion — ethics, he suggested, was a matter of action more than intention. To illustrate the point, he told the story of someone who had reviewed one of his early efforts badly; when, sometime later, Hitchens was asked to review a book by the same writer, he jumped at the chance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By Jeff Bailey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Through his Vanity Fair essays, his books and his television appearances, Christopher Hitchens has become one of our leading provocateurs, saying what many of us might be thinking (though he's more articulate) but are afraid to utter. Public intellectual, pundit, whatever, he is frequently thought-provoking and almost always entertaining, if occasionally offensive. So as he deals with a diagnosis of esophageal cancer, an admirer and fellow writer, Windsor Mann, has collected many of Hitchens' most piquant remarks and we have them now in "The Quotable Hitchens: From Alcohol to Zionism.
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Grey's Anatomy," Thursday, Jan. 11 and 18, 9 p.m., "Six Days." --- The premise: Intern George O'Malley (T.R. Knight) is worried because his father, Harold, having recently undergone a heart operation (aortic valve replacement), is now having an operation for esophageal cancer. The doctors don't know if the cancer has spread. Harold is told that the tumor won't be removed if it is too extensive. Harold tells the surgeon, Dr. Richard Webber (James Pickens Jr.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Writer Christopher Hitchens, 62, died Thursday of pneumonia, a complication of the esophageal cancer he battled for more than a year. Hitchens was best known for his essays about politics and faith.  An atheist, he famously debated religion with practicing Christians, including former British Prime Minister Tony Blair and National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins. But in the last year of his life he also distinguished himself by writing about his cancer, penning a National Magazine Award-winning series of columns for the magazine Vanity Fair.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By Jeff Bailey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Through his Vanity Fair essays, his books and his television appearances, Christopher Hitchens has become one of our leading provocateurs, saying what many of us might be thinking (though he's more articulate) but are afraid to utter. Public intellectual, pundit, whatever, he is frequently thought-provoking and almost always entertaining, if occasionally offensive. So as he deals with a diagnosis of esophageal cancer, an admirer and fellow writer, Windsor Mann, has collected many of Hitchens' most piquant remarks and we have them now in "The Quotable Hitchens: From Alcohol to Zionism.
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