Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEsperanto Language
IN THE NEWS

Esperanto Language

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989 | JAMES TORTOLANO
La birdoj vidis la insektojn . Or in English, the bird saw the insects. Welcome to the world of Esperanto, the would-be world language that just can't seem to get the respect its supporters say it deserves. It was back in 1887 when Dr. L.L. Zamenhof dreamed up the idea of uniting the world's people with a single language bearing a resemblance to nearly every European language. It has not caught on. But there are some hardy followers out there, such as J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989 | JAMES TORTOLANO
La birdoj vidis la insektojn . Or in English, the bird saw the insects. Welcome to the world of Esperanto, the would-be world language that just can't seem to get the respect its supporters say it deserves. It was back in 1887 when Dr. L.L. Zamenhof dreamed up the idea of uniting the world's people with a single language bearing a resemblance to nearly every European language. It has not caught on. But there are some hardy followers out there, such as J.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987
Thank you for publishing an article on Esperanto. But even a sympathetic and well-researched article may not convey one important point: Learning Esperanto is fun, and quite useful if you would like to get to know people in most nations of the world. After taking the free 10-lesson postal course offered by the Esperanto League for North America (well, almost free--you're expected to pay the postage), I found that there are people around the world who are looking for correspondents and who publish their addresses in Esperanto magazines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987
Thank you for publishing an article on Esperanto. But even a sympathetic and well-researched article may not convey one important point: Learning Esperanto is fun, and quite useful if you would like to get to know people in most nations of the world. After taking the free 10-lesson postal course offered by the Esperanto League for North America (well, almost free--you're expected to pay the postage), I found that there are people around the world who are looking for correspondents and who publish their addresses in Esperanto magazines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993 | DOUG McCLELLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His travel itinerary listed his destination as Valencia, Spain, but Myron Bondelid, a retired mathematics professor from Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks, knew where he was really heading: "Esperantujo," he said, giving the jo a Spanish-sounding yo inflection. "Esperanto-land." Bondelid was one of hundreds of Esperantists who arrived in Valencia last week for the opening of the Universala Kongreso de Esperanto, which means--well, it's fairly obvious what it means.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2001 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fox Lorber Home Video's release of Leslie Stevens' "Incubus" may at last lift a curse that seems to have bedeviled this 1965 one-of-a-kind supernatural thriller. "Incubus" has attained mythic status among horror movie buffs, cult film aficionados and, of course, the French. It never received theatrical distribution in this country and for years was thought to have been lost until a print was located in France, the only country where the film received a theatrical run.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1987 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
Melissa Sherwood wanted to learn more about the world of her ancestors so this fall she enrolled in an Armenian language class at California State University, Northridge. Lebanese emigrant Peter Tashjian signed up for the course so he could brush up on the Armenian he had learned as a child. And Mary Burunsuzyan, who spoke an eastern Armenian dialect in her Soviet Armenia homeland, took the course to learn the western Armenian dialect that is more commonly heard in the United States.
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
Melissa Sherwood wanted to learn more about the world of her ancestors, so this fall she enrolled in an Armenian-language class at California State University, Northridge. Lebanese emigrant Peter Tashjian signed up for the course so he could brush up on the Armenian he had learned as a child. And Mary Burunsuzyan, who spoke an eastern Armenian dialect in her Soviet Armenia homeland, took the course to learn the western Armenian dialect that is more commonly heard in the United States.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|