Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEspionage
IN THE NEWS

Espionage

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and ERIC SLATER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move the government called a warning to disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to peddle U.S. defense secrets, a former Lockheed engineer was indicted Thursday on charges of attempted espionage for allegedly trying to sell secret plans concerning the Sea Shadow, a Navy stealth project. John Douglas Charlton, 62, allegedly tried to sell the plans concerning the ship and other projects to an FBI agent posing as an official of an unnamed Western European government, according to prosecutors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By John Kiriakou
The confirmation in December that former CIA Director Leon Panetta let classified information slip to "Zero Dark Thirty" screenwriter Mark Boal during a speech at the agency headquarters should result in a criminal espionage charge if there is any truth to Obama administration claims that it isn't enforcing the Espionage Act only against political opponents. I'm one of the people the Obama administration charged with criminal espionage, one of those whose lives were torn apart by being accused, essentially, of betraying his country.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 30, 2013
Re "Europe seeks a meeting on spying," Oct. 26 The U.S. does not deny having spied on leaders of its closest allies. There seems to be no public uproar at this fiasco that directly damages U.S. interests, nor does there seems to be a presidential intent of dismissing the heads of the agencies responsible for such a breach of trust. On the contrary, officialdom appears rather smug, projecting the aura that they should have gotten away with it. Now that the U.S. has been exposed snooping on trusted partners, perhaps the president should grant clemency to Jonathan Pollard, convicted of transmitting to Israel U.S. intelligence.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Morsi appeared in court on Sunday for the first hearing of the case in which he is accused of spying and conspiring to commit acts of terrorism. In what prosecutors called "the biggest conspiracy case in Egypt's history," Morsi and 35 other Muslim Brotherhood leaders are charged with cooperating with Palestine's Hamas, the Lebanese Hezbollah and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard to execute terror attacks in Egypt. Defendants are also accused of disclosing military secrets to a foreign state.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Morsi appeared in court on Sunday for the first hearing of the case in which he is accused of spying and conspiring to commit acts of terrorism. In what prosecutors called "the biggest conspiracy case in Egypt's history," Morsi and 35 other Muslim Brotherhood leaders are charged with cooperating with Palestine's Hamas, the Lebanese Hezbollah and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard to execute terror attacks in Egypt. Defendants are also accused of disclosing military secrets to a foreign state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The case of a Chinese businessman charged with illegally shipping missile guidance technology to China's military has intensified concerns about espionage in the Silicon Valley. Qing Chang Jiang is at least the fourth Chinese native indicted since October on charges involving the shipment of equipment or trade secrets to China from this region.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 23-year-old Marine corporal stationed in Yuma, Ariz., has been arrested on suspicion of attempted espionage, Navy officials said Thursday. The incident involved national defense matters unrelated to the Persian Gulf War, the officials said. Charles Lee Francis Anzalone, a field telephone wire specialist assigned to the Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, was arrested Feb. 13 by Naval Investigative Service agents after a four-month joint investigation with the FBI.
WORLD
September 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgian authorities detained four Russian military officers on spying charges, and security forces surrounded Russia's military headquarters in Tbilisi to demand that a fifth suspect be handed over, Interior Minister Vano Merabishvili said. The Russian Foreign Ministry demanded the officers' immediate release and said the allegations were unfounded.
NEWS
June 1, 1986 | Reuters
A 43-year-old Dutch woman was sentenced to two years in jail Friday for making copies of secret papers about North Atlantic Treaty Organization tank armor to pass to East Germany. Ellen Tunnissen, a member of a communist fringe party, admitted making the photocopies in the patent office where she worked. She said she wanted to maintain the military balance between East and West. Tunnissen copied about 100 pages of secret Dutch and West German papers over a period of four months.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | From Reuters
An anti-espionage poster by the West German counterintelligence service that depicts a pretty blonde smiling seductively over her shoulder has sparked complaints of sexual discrimination. The public service union said it demanded the withdrawal of the poster after receiving a complaint from a female customs officer who was offended by the depiction of woman as seductress.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi brushed back the assertions of leading Republicans that the former NSA contractor who leaked details of American spying was a “traitor,” but said Friday that Edward Snowden needs to return and face trial, or reach a plea deal, for his deeds. At a meeting with Los Angeles Times editors and reporters, Pelosi navigated between those who consider Snowden's actions unpatriotic and others grateful that he laid bare America's spying secrets - the latter group comprised of many of Pelosi's natural constituents on the Democratic left.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Jonna Mendez was a globe-trotting spy for nearly three decades, briefing the president, slipping across borders armed with false identities, using cameras so tiny they fit into a lipstick tube or a blazer button. As the CIA's chief of disguise, she helped fellow agents avoid detection. She married Tony Mendez, a fellow agent recently portrayed by actor Ben Affleck in the Oscar-winning espionage film "Argo. " In retirement, Jonna Mendez's undercover operations haven't stopped.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Corporations are increasingly spying on nonprofit groups they view as potential threats with little fear of retribution, according to a new report by a corporate watchdog group. The large companies employ former Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, FBI, military and police officers to monitor and in some cases infiltrate groups that have been critical of them, according to the report by Essential Information, which was founded by Ralph Nader in the 1980s. "Many different types of nonprofits have been targeted with espionage, including environmental, anti-war, public interest, consumer, food safety, pesticide reform, nursing-home reform, gun control, social justice, animal rights and arms control groups," the report said.
OPINION
October 30, 2013
Re "Europe seeks a meeting on spying," Oct. 26 The U.S. does not deny having spied on leaders of its closest allies. There seems to be no public uproar at this fiasco that directly damages U.S. interests, nor does there seems to be a presidential intent of dismissing the heads of the agencies responsible for such a breach of trust. On the contrary, officialdom appears rather smug, projecting the aura that they should have gotten away with it. Now that the U.S. has been exposed snooping on trusted partners, perhaps the president should grant clemency to Jonathan Pollard, convicted of transmitting to Israel U.S. intelligence.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- Distilling their anger over reports of U.S. spying on European citizens and governments, including heads of state, European Union leaders are calling for a meeting with U.S. officials on the matter before the end of the year. In a statement issued by European Council President Herman van Rompuy and posted Friday on the EU's website, the leaders summarized their discussions Thursday on allegations of National Security Agency monitoring of phone traffic across Europe.    The statement, supported by leaders of all 28 EU member states, backed a proposal by France and Germany leading to call for direct talks with U.S. officials.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was convicted Tuesday of violating the Espionage Act and faces up to 136 years in prison, but his acquittal on the even more serious charge of aiding the enemy was hailed as a victory for the press and the Internet against the government's crackdown on leaks of classified information. Manning's leak of more than 700,000 State Department cables, terrorism detainee assessments, combat logs and videos was the largest breach of classified secrets in U.S. history.
WORLD
April 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Researcher Igor V. Sutyagin was found guilty of espionage, Russian news agencies reported. Sutyagin, a scholar at Moscow's respected USA-Canada Institute, was jailed in October 1999 on charges that he sold information on nuclear submarines and missile warning systems to a British company that Russian investigators assert was a CIA cover. Sutyagin maintained that the analyses he wrote were based on open sources and that he had no reason to suspect the company.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Navy petty officer was sentenced to 12 years in prison for stealing a military laptop and peddling its contents to a foreign government. Petty Officer 3rd Class Ariel J. Weinmann, 22, admitted guilt to espionage, desertion, larceny and destruction of government property before a military judge at Norfolk Naval Station this week. Officials had accused Weinmann of passing classified information to representatives of undisclosed foreign governments in Austria and in Mexico.
WORLD
July 26, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Egypt's political divisions seethed Friday as rival rallies between opponents and supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsi resounded across the nation, and the military moved to weaken the resolve of Islamists after nearly a month of unrest. The country's volatile atmosphere - tanks clattered and riot police gathered - sharpened hours after state media reported that prosecutors had accused Morsi of espionage, murder and conspiring with the Palestinian militant group Hamas.
WORLD
June 25, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - With Edward Snowden tucked away in or near a bustling international airport here, Russia and China hit back Tuesday against the United States, denying charges that they had helped him avoid arrest under a felony warrant for espionage as he fled Hong Kong and laid over in Moscow. "The accusations against the Chinese government are groundless," said Hua Chunying, the spokeswoman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry. "Mr. Snowden is a free man, and the sooner he chooses his final destination, the better both for him and for us," Russian President Vladimir Putin declared.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|