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Espionage Bulgaria

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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to stand tall under the glaring light of glasnost , Bulgaria has ordered its spies in from the cold and furled its poison-tipped umbrellas. The Balkan nation that once directed one of the world's most sinister secret services has declared a formal end to all hostile intelligence activity and opened its archives to foreign scrutiny.
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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to stand tall under the glaring light of glasnost , Bulgaria has ordered its spies in from the cold and furled its poison-tipped umbrellas. The Balkan nation that once directed one of the world's most sinister secret services has declared a formal end to all hostile intelligence activity and opened its archives to foreign scrutiny.
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NEWS
July 22, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Britain on Tuesday expelled Bulgaria's military attache in London for suspected espionage. Col. Ivan Pavlov Djambov was given 14 days to leave because of what a Foreign Office spokesman said were "activities incompatible with his status," a phrase normally used to indicate spying. Bulgarian Charge d'Affaires Philip Bokov was summoned to the Foreign Office to be told that Djambov, who is married with two children, will have to leave.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Britain on Tuesday expelled Bulgaria's military attache in London for suspected espionage. Col. Ivan Pavlov Djambov was given 14 days to leave because of what a Foreign Office spokesman said were "activities incompatible with his status," a phrase normally used to indicate spying. Bulgarian Charge d'Affaires Philip Bokov was summoned to the Foreign Office to be told that Djambov, who is married with two children, will have to leave.
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