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Espionage Czechoslovakia

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June 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case described as one of the most serious instances of treason in the post-World War II era, a West German court Wednesday sentenced a retired U.S. Army sergeant to life in prison for passing top-secret NATO battle plans to the Soviet Bloc.
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NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A former soldier who was once stationed in West Germany was sentenced in Tampa, Fla., to 25 years in prison for plotting to deliver highly sensitive defense documents to Hungarian and Czech agents. Federal officials said the espionage involved one of the most serious breaches of Western security during the Cold War. Kelly Therese Warren, 32, of Warner Robins, Ga., pleaded guilty last fall to conspiring to commit espionage while stationed with the U.S.
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NEWS
June 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An ex-Army sergeant charged in one of the most significant espionage schemes ever uncovered appeared in court in Tampa, Fla., on Friday, while federal agents there searched three sites for top-secret documents that the former soldier allegedly hoped to sell to foreign agents.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army sergeant was charged with espionage Thursday for providing "extremely sensitive" Army and North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense secrets, including tactical nuclear weapon plans, to intelligence agents for Hungary and Czechoslovakia from 1985 through 1988. Sgt. Jeffrey Stephen Rondeau, 29, was arrested in Tampa, Fla., by the FBI on a three-count indictment--the latest development in the investigation of an alleged espionage ring organized in West Germany by former Army Sgt.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
FBI agents in Tampa, Fla., arrested a former Army sergeant Thursday night on charges of taking part in an espionage ring found to have "endangered the entire defense capability of the West" by selling secrets to Hungarian and Czechoslovakian agents. Roderick James Ramsay, 28, was charged with gathering or delivering what FBI Director William S. Sessions described as "extremely sensitive" information to a foreign government while serving in West Germany between 1983 and 1985.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army sergeant was charged with espionage Thursday for providing "extremely sensitive" Army and North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense secrets, including tactical nuclear weapon plans, to intelligence agents for Hungary and Czechoslovakia from 1985 through 1988. Sgt. Jeffrey Stephen Rondeau, 29, was arrested in Tampa, Fla., by the FBI on a three-count indictment--the latest development in the investigation of an alleged espionage ring organized in West Germany by former Army Sgt.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A former soldier who was once stationed in West Germany was sentenced in Tampa, Fla., to 25 years in prison for plotting to deliver highly sensitive defense documents to Hungarian and Czech agents. Federal officials said the espionage involved one of the most serious breaches of Western security during the Cold War. Kelly Therese Warren, 32, of Warner Robins, Ga., pleaded guilty last fall to conspiring to commit espionage while stationed with the U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | Reuters
President Vaclav Havel said Sunday that the Communist secret police tried to recruit him in the 1950s but gave up after three months. His remarks were an apparent reaction to the recent naming of journalists and other public figures as agents and informers of the once-dreaded secret police. The former leading dissident said he decided to declassify his own file.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From Reuters
A Czechoslovak spy sent to Britain to ferret out U.S. "Star Wars" secrets and to infiltrate Soviet emigre groups was sentenced to prison for 10 years Friday. The 44-year-old man told British security agents who caught him receiving coded radio messages at his London home that he was Dutch-born art dealer Erwin van Haarlem.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | From Reuters
Britain on Thursday ordered three Czechoslovak diplomats to leave the country within two weeks for "engaging in activities incompatible with their status," a diplomatic euphemism for spying. The order was the latest in a series of diplomatic expulsions over the past month in an apparent government crackdown following increased scrutiny of foreign missions. A Foreign Office spokesman said Czechoslovak Ambassador Jan Fidler was summoned to the Foreign Office and told that an air attache, Maj.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | Associated Press
A former Army sergeant was sentenced to 36 years in prison for selling military secrets to Hungary and Czechoslovakia. During Friday's sentencing, a U.S. district court judge said Roderick James Ramsay's cooperation with the government convinced him to be more lenient. Ramsay, 30, had faced life in prison after pleading guilty to one count of espionage. He admitted selling information between 1983 and 1986 for $20,000.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | Reuters
President Vaclav Havel said Sunday that the Communist secret police tried to recruit him in the 1950s but gave up after three months. His remarks were an apparent reaction to the recent naming of journalists and other public figures as agents and informers of the once-dreaded secret police. The former leading dissident said he decided to declassify his own file.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An ex-Army sergeant charged in one of the most significant espionage schemes ever uncovered appeared in court in Tampa, Fla., on Friday, while federal agents there searched three sites for top-secret documents that the former soldier allegedly hoped to sell to foreign agents.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
FBI agents in Tampa, Fla., arrested a former Army sergeant Thursday night on charges of taking part in an espionage ring found to have "endangered the entire defense capability of the West" by selling secrets to Hungarian and Czechoslovakian agents. Roderick James Ramsay, 28, was charged with gathering or delivering what FBI Director William S. Sessions described as "extremely sensitive" information to a foreign government while serving in West Germany between 1983 and 1985.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case described as one of the most serious instances of treason in the post-World War II era, a West German court Wednesday sentenced a retired U.S. Army sergeant to life in prison for passing top-secret NATO battle plans to the Soviet Bloc.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Britain ordered the expulsion of four diplomats at Czechoslovakia's Embassy on Thursday for "activities incompatible with their status," and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said she is not willing to sacrifice national security for better ties with the East Bloc. Czechoslovak Ambassador Jan Fidler, who was summoned to the Foreign Office, was told the four diplomats had 14 days to leave the country. Fidler later issued a statement denying what he called the "totally unfounded allegations" of espionage.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | Associated Press
A former Army sergeant was sentenced to 36 years in prison for selling military secrets to Hungary and Czechoslovakia. During Friday's sentencing, a U.S. district court judge said Roderick James Ramsay's cooperation with the government convinced him to be more lenient. Ramsay, 30, had faced life in prison after pleading guilty to one count of espionage. He admitted selling information between 1983 and 1986 for $20,000.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Britain ordered the expulsion of four diplomats at Czechoslovakia's Embassy on Thursday for "activities incompatible with their status," and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said she is not willing to sacrifice national security for better ties with the East Bloc. Czechoslovak Ambassador Jan Fidler, who was summoned to the Foreign Office, was told the four diplomats had 14 days to leave the country. Fidler later issued a statement denying what he called the "totally unfounded allegations" of espionage.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From Reuters
A Czechoslovak spy sent to Britain to ferret out U.S. "Star Wars" secrets and to infiltrate Soviet emigre groups was sentenced to prison for 10 years Friday. The 44-year-old man told British security agents who caught him receiving coded radio messages at his London home that he was Dutch-born art dealer Erwin van Haarlem.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | From Reuters
Britain on Thursday ordered three Czechoslovak diplomats to leave the country within two weeks for "engaging in activities incompatible with their status," a diplomatic euphemism for spying. The order was the latest in a series of diplomatic expulsions over the past month in an apparent government crackdown following increased scrutiny of foreign missions. A Foreign Office spokesman said Czechoslovak Ambassador Jan Fidler was summoned to the Foreign Office and told that an air attache, Maj.
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