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Espionage England

NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A newspaper today published an excerpt from the memoirs of a retired counterintelligence officer in defiance of a government ban upheld last week by Britain's highest court. Another paper published material from Peter Wright's "Spycatcher" but did not use direct excerpts. Newspapers have published excerpts from the book before, and the government has begun contempt-of-court prosecutions. If found guilty, the papers are liable to unlimited fines or possible jail terms for the editors.
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NEWS
March 13, 1987
An Australian judge has ruled against a British government attempt to block publication of a book by former counterespionage agent Peter Wright. The government had sought an injunction to bar Heinemann Publishers from printing "Spycatcher" by Wright, arguing that publication of the book was harmful to national interests. Wright, 71, whose job for the British counterespionage agency MI-5 was tracking down traitors, retired in 1976.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | Reuters
American and British commando forces have stolen an Iraqi surface-to-air missile in a behind-the-lines raid on occupied Kuwait, the London Sunday Times said. The newspaper quoted a senior Pentagon official as saying that troops from U.S. Special Forces and Britain's Special Air Service flew by helicopter to Kuwait, seized the missile and brought it back to Saudi Arabia for dismantling. It said that during the raid last month, the missile's Iraqi crew was taken prisoner and interrogated.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through its 83-year history, Britain's Secret Intelligence Service has lived up to its title: The government has never officially acknowledged its existence. And unlike its counterparts--the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and Russia's KGB--the British spy service's headquarters here is an unmarked high-rise London office building, which security guards identify only as "Ministry of Defense."
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Iraqi protesters marched in the capital and other cities Saturday to express anger at the British measures taken to censure Iraq for hanging a London-based journalist accused of spying. Also Saturday, President Saddam Hussein flew to Saudi Arabia for consultations with King Fahd. The official Saudi Press Agency said Fahd invited Hussein after the international uproar over the execution of Farzad Bazoft.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Britain on Thursday recalled its ambassador from Iraq and halted ministerial contacts with the government of President Saddam Hussein to protest Baghdad's hanging of a London-based journalist it accused of spying. "Thatcher wanted him alive. We sent him in a box," Information Minister Latif Nassayif Jassim said in breaking the news of the Thursday morning execution in Baghdad.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The British government Thursday lost the final round of an international campaign to ban the memoirs of retired intelligence agent Peter Wright, although senior judges described his disclosures as treachery. Five judges in the House of Lords, the country's highest appeal court, ruled unanimously that newspapers in Britain could print allegations of misdeeds by British security services contained in Wright's book "Spycatcher."
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