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Espionage Germany

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NEWS
March 11, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a public snub, former U.S. President Richard Nixon said Thursday that his friendship and support for Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin remain untarnished. "I came here as his friend and I remain his friend. I wish him well," Nixon said at a reception in his honor given by the U.S. ambassador. No high-ranking Russian official attended.
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NEWS
March 11, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a public snub, former U.S. President Richard Nixon said Thursday that his friendship and support for Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin remain untarnished. "I came here as his friend and I remain his friend. I wish him well," Nixon said at a reception in his honor given by the U.S. ambassador. No high-ranking Russian official attended.
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NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's last KGB spymaster acknowledged Friday that Moscow had lost the "secret war" of espionage and paid tribute to German, French and U.S. opponents. He also credited the services of Iraq and Israel. Leonid Shebarshin, dismissed as head of the KGB's intelligence section after last August's failed coup, said Russians who had spied for Washington were driven by "boundless selfishness and egoism compounded by absence of any strength of will."
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's last KGB spymaster acknowledged Friday that Moscow had lost the "secret war" of espionage and paid tribute to German, French and U.S. opponents. He also credited the services of Iraq and Israel. Leonid Shebarshin, dismissed as head of the KGB's intelligence section after last August's failed coup, said Russians who had spied for Washington were driven by "boundless selfishness and egoism compounded by absence of any strength of will."
WORLD
October 21, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - France reacted angrily Monday to a news report of mass electronic surveillance of its residents by the U.S. National Security Agency, summoning the American ambassador to explain what it called unacceptable treatment by a close ally. Based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, Le Monde reported that the agency's intelligence dragnet collected 70.3 million pieces of data on French phone communications in a single month beginning in December of last year.
OPINION
October 12, 1997 | David Wise, David Wise is the author of "Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million."
It had begun in 1989 when a few hundred East Germans took to the streets, then tens of thousands, their ranks swelling to half a million in Leipzig, until finally, the Berlin Wall came tumbling down in November. Less than a year later, the German Democratic Republic was history. Markus Wolf, the legendary spymaster who for 34 years headed the foreign intelligence arm of the Stasi, East Germany's secret police, had to flee.
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