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Espionage North Korea

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NEWS
June 23, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second such incident in less than two years, South Korea on Monday captured off its coast a North Korean submarine--the type of vessel often deployed in spy missions, though the intentions and fate of the crew of this mission were not immediately known. The seizure comes at a time when new South Korean President Kim Dae Jung has been taking a markedly softer line toward the hostile, Communist North than his predecessors.
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NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Red Cross talks between North and South Korea to reunite families separated by the Korean War stumbled from the beginning Tuesday because of disagreements over repatriating Communist spies held in the South. Red Cross officials of the Korean nations began a four-day session at a hotel on Mt. Kumgang, a sightseeing attraction on the North's east coast. A key agenda item was how to reunite families separated by the war half a century ago.
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NEWS
June 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Delays caused by currents and the approach of nightfall forced the South Korean navy to postpone an attempt to raise a suspected North Korean spy submarine from the seabed until today. Divers attached ropes and air bags to the craft, which was captured after surfacing Monday when its periscope and propeller became entangled in fishing nets. The mini-sub broke loose from a tow line and sank in about 100 feet of water a mile offshore Tuesday as the navy tried to tow it to a dockyard.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Dong Ki was a 35-year-old North Korean intelligence agent when he was caught spying by archenemy South Korea in 1966 and thrown into jail. Thirty-three years later, when Kim was freed in an amnesty program, an astonishing thing happened: South Koreans embraced him with a hero's welcome. Taxi drivers here in Kwangju gave him free rides when they learned his identity. A human rights group rented an immaculate house for him. Townspeople donated new appliances.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
In a major concession, North Korea has agreed to apologize for the September intrusion of a spy submarine into South Korean waters, officials here said today. U.S. officials, on behalf of South Korea, had been negotiating with the Communist North over the apology since Dec. 9. South Korea demanded an apology before it would improve relations with the North and renew economic aid to its impoverished neighbor.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Government troops killed another North Korean in their hunt for the Communist intruders who came ashore after their submarine ran aground off the eastern coast Sept. 18. Twenty-two North Korean agents have since been killed--South Korean officials say 11 of them may have been shot by their comrades--but officials believe more are still at large. One was captured. Meanwhile, Deputy Prime Minister Kwon O Ki told parliament that North Korea will "pay the price" for its incursion.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
Prosecutors said they have obtained a subpoena to question South Korean opposition leader Kim Dae Jung in connection with charges that two members of his party spied for North Korea. Kim angrily denied any wrongdoing and said he would comply with the subpoena to prove his innocence. Kim, leader of the Party for Peace and Democracy, accused President Roh Tae Woo's government of trying to destroy the opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1987 | From Reuters
A university professor was jailed for 15 years Saturday for spying for North Korea and trying to incite revolution in South Korea, court officials said. Lee Pyong Sol, 48, a geography professor at Seoul's state-run National University, was convicted of giving North Korea vital information about political, social and military affairs and inciting radical students and workers to stage violent anti-government protests, the officials said.
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | From Reuters
Korean Air Lines has agreed to pay $106,000 in compensation to relatives of each of 115 people aboard one of its planes that disappeared near Burma in November, an airline spokesman said Thursday. The government has said that the Boeing 707 is believed to have exploded in mid-flight en route flight from Baghdad, Iraq, to Seoul shortly before a scheduled refueling stop at Bangkok, Thailand, on Nov. 29. Seoul officials said the explosion was believed to have been caused by North Korean agents.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
A week after a North Korean infiltrator was killed, police said they shot and captured a second North Korean 100 miles south of the border after a shootout that killed one police officer and wounded two others. Authorities said another infiltrator escaped. Police believed they had him surrounded and were waiting for daylight to resume the search in Puyo. The captured man, Kim Do Shik, 33, told police he slipped into South Korea in August but refused to answer other questions, officials said.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
North Korea said Saturday that it had nothing to do with the incursion of two suspected spy ships in Japanese waters last week. The intrusion triggered a tense pursuit by Japanese coast guard and military ships, which fired warning shots, the first since 1953. The unidentified vessels, disguised as fishing boats, fled to a North Korean port, Japanese officials said.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese warships firing warning shots and military aircraft dropping explosives chased two suspected spy ships in the Sea of Japan for more than 24 hours but gave up Wednesday when the vessels sped into North Korean territorial waters, the government said.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
Military investigators found traces of poison in a body recovered from a suspected North Korean spy boat sunk by South Korea's navy, officials here said Saturday. The finding indicated that some of the crew members may have killed themselves before their vessel was sunk Friday, Defense Ministry officials said. The low-slung speedboat, carrying an estimated four people, was spotted as it approached Yosu, a small port on the southern tip of the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea blamed South Korea for the death of nine North Korean crewmen aboard a submarine captured by the South and demanded the return of the vessel and its dead crew, a news agency reported. The North Korean submarine was found tangled in a South Korean fishing net Monday. When it was towed ashore, South Korean commandos found the bodies of the crewmen--all shot to death, apparently to avoid capture.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean officials opened a captured North Korean submarine today and found nine bodies with wounds that suggested that four of the crew had executed the other five and then killed themselves to avoid capture, South Korean Defense Ministry officials said.
NEWS
June 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Delays caused by currents and the approach of nightfall forced the South Korean navy to postpone an attempt to raise a suspected North Korean spy submarine from the seabed until today. Divers attached ropes and air bags to the craft, which was captured after surfacing Monday when its periscope and propeller became entangled in fishing nets. The mini-sub broke loose from a tow line and sank in about 100 feet of water a mile offshore Tuesday as the navy tried to tow it to a dockyard.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A violent espionage drama between the two Koreas deepened Thursday as Southern forces killed a total of seven infiltrators from the enemy North and a captured spy confessed that his side had conducted intelligence operations on South Korean air defense systems. The casualties brought to 18 the number of North Koreans left dead after their submarine ran aground near the eastern city of Kangnung on Wednesday in what Seoul is calling Pyongyang's worst provocation in nearly 30 years.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second such incident in less than two years, South Korea on Monday captured off its coast a North Korean submarine--the type of vessel often deployed in spy missions, though the intentions and fate of the crew of this mission were not immediately known. The seizure comes at a time when new South Korean President Kim Dae Jung has been taking a markedly softer line toward the hostile, Communist North than his predecessors.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tormented by illness and guilt, Chang Yong Woon slumped on his office couch here last week reciting a lengthy confession of his 18 years of work for a secret North Korean spy network in Japan.
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