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Espionage Russia

NEWS
May 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Robert Philip Hanssen, a 25-year veteran FBI agent, was indicted Wednesday on espionage charges. Federal prosecutors said the father of six "betrayed his country for over 15 years" and seriously compromised the security of the country. If convicted, he could be sentenced to death. The 57-page indictment handed up by a grand jury in Alexandria, Va.
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NEWS
December 21, 1999 | Reuters
Melita Norwood, the 87-year-old British great-grandmother who admitted spying for the Soviet Union during the Cold War, will not face prosecution, legal authorities said Monday. Norwood said in September that she passed secrets to Moscow while working in Britain's atomic weapons program after World War II. Solicitor General Ross Cranston said cases of four other alleged spies revealed in KGB papers published this year would not be pursued.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Navy petty officer was charged with attempted espionage after he allegedly offered information about nuclear submarine technology to a Russian official last month, U.S. officials said. Kurt G. Lessenthien, 29, an instructor at the Navy Nuclear Power School in Orlando, Fla., was arrested after the FBI found out about his alleged offer to the Russians. No classified information was passed to any unauthorized person.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for Robert Philip Hanssen, the accused FBI spy, have abruptly rejected entreaties from federal prosecutors that they enter into a plea agreement and have told the government they are ready to proceed to trial on espionage charges. The sticking point is the refusal of prosecutors to promise Hanssen before any plea that they would not ask a judge to impose the death penalty on him.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's one espionage suspect on trial, a U.S. Fulbright scholar was branded a spy in training and held on drug charges, and the United States is accusing Russia of buying surveillance secrets from a high-level FBI agent. Into this ferment, Russia's former spymaster emerged Friday from semi-retirement to say that all the "spy mania" is overblown.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators are trying to determine whether fired FBI agent Robert Philip Hanssen may have begun spying for the Russians as early as 1979, when he apparently was caught by his wife counting large, unexplained amounts of cash, a source familiar with the investigation said Friday. The Justice Department has charged publicly that the former counterespionage agent began spying for the Russians in 1985 in exchange for $1.4 million in cash and diamonds.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the CIA and FBI determined to learn whether Aldrich H. Ames had confederates inside the intelligence agency, the accused spy is showing his first willingness to cooperate with investigators--but only if they recommend leniency for his wife, The Times learned Wednesday.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Reuters
A former U.S. intelligence agent accused of spying for the Soviet Union during the Cold War was denied bail Tuesday by a federal judge in Florida. George Trofimoff was arrested last week in Tampa on charges of selling secrets to the Soviet KGB while he worked as a civilian at the U.S. Army's Joint Interrogation Center in Nuremberg, Germany, from 1969 to 1994. Trofimoff, 73, retired from his intelligence job in 1995 and moved to Melbourne on Florida's east coast. U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A former KGB agent held in the United States on espionage charges flew back to a hero's welcome in Moscow on Saturday and said it felt great to be free again. Washington dismissed its case against Vladimir Galkin on Thursday after Moscow threatened retaliatory measures. Russia believes the United States violated an unwritten, gentlemanly code of honor in international espionage allowing former agents to travel freely.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Monday that "extraordinarily strong" evidence against accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen warrants keeping him behind bars for now, as Russian diplomats demanded information about a secret eavesdropping tunnel that may be linked to the former FBI agent. Russian officials said reports that the United States built the spy tunnel underneath the Soviet Embassy in Washington beginning in the 1970s, if true, reveal "a flagrant violation" of international law.
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