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Espionage South Africa

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NEWS
November 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A 27-year-old white woman who infiltrated the African National Congress for her native South Africa was sentenced Friday to 25 years in prison on spy charges. Odile Harington, an arts graduate and daughter of a Johannesburg doctor, bit her lip but showed no other emotion when sentenced. "The most appropriate sentence in a case such as this is in my view the death penalty," said High Court Judge Wilson Sandura. The judge refused to allow her to appeal the sentence, the maximum under Zimbabwe law.
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NEWS
February 26, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A private intelligence network with ties to an American Jewish group and South Africa is under investigation for illegally tapping into police sources and collecting information on the political activities of more than 12,000 people, authorities say. As part of the investigation, San Francisco authorities say they have confiscated files containing personal information on a wide range of political activists, ethnic advocates, writers and other U.S.
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NEWS
October 12, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
A former civilian operations analyst at the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland pleaded guilty Tuesday to spying for South Africa in the first espionage case involving that country to be prosecuted in the United States. In the plea in federal court in Baltimore, Thomas Joseph Dolce, 49, admitted providing a South African military attache with classified ballistic research information. The espionage case was the second uncovered at the Aberdeen facility this year. Other Alleged Spying U.S.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rocket Scientist Found Guilty: Ronald J. Hoffman, a rocket scientist employed by Science Applications International Corp., was found guilty after a two-month trial of illegally exporting military technology to South Africa and Japan and failure to register as an arms exporter. Assistant U.S. Atty.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Justice Department political appointee with a high security clearance was investigated last year for possibly disclosing classified information to the government of South Africa, government sources said Thursday. The official, Roger Pilon, a Ronald Reagan appointee who headed the Office of Asylum Policy and Review, subsequently resigned, but the circumstances of his departure are now the subject of dispute.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A private intelligence network with ties to an American Jewish group and South Africa is under investigation for illegally tapping into police sources and collecting information on the political activities of more than 12,000 people, authorities say. As part of the investigation, San Francisco authorities say they have confiscated files containing personal information on a wide range of political activists, ethnic advocates, writers and other U.S.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Accused government spies said Sunday that the African National Congress systematically tortured them at its exile prison camps in Angola and Uganda. Thin and clutching their few belongings, the 32 alleged government informers returned to South Africa late Saturday after the ANC turned them over to the International Committee of the Red Cross.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rocket Scientist Found Guilty: Ronald J. Hoffman, a rocket scientist employed by Science Applications International Corp., was found guilty after a two-month trial of illegally exporting military technology to South Africa and Japan and failure to register as an arms exporter. Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990 | STEPHEN BRAUN and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Customs agents posing as brokers for South African businessmen arrested a Los Angeles engineer who has been charged with illegally attempting to sell them technical data from a restricted Strategic Defense Initiative missile research project, federal authorities said Friday. Prosecutors said that the engineer, Ronald J. Hoffman, 51, was also under investigation for exporting or agreeing to export similar data to at least four Japanese industrial firms over the last four years.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A British woman who fled from an outlawed guerrilla group last year was actually a South African police officer assigned to spy on the anti-apartheid movement, the government said Friday. Olivia Forsyth, 28, was held captive by the African National Congress for 22 months before she fled in May to the British Embassy in Luanda, Angola. She holed up in the embassy for six months before returning here.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Accused government spies said Sunday that the African National Congress systematically tortured them at its exile prison camps in Angola and Uganda. Thin and clutching their few belongings, the 32 alleged government informers returned to South Africa late Saturday after the ANC turned them over to the International Committee of the Red Cross.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
A former aerospace research firm executive was indicted Thursday in Los Angeles on charges he allegedly exported sensitive information on the "Star Wars" weapons system to Japan. The federal grand jury indictment charges Ronald Hoffman, 51, of Los Angeles, with illegally exporting technical data relating to arms, ammunition and implements of war and lying on export control documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990 | STEPHEN BRAUN and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Customs agents posing as brokers for South African businessmen arrested a Los Angeles engineer who has been charged with illegally attempting to sell them technical data from a restricted Strategic Defense Initiative missile research project, federal authorities said Friday. Prosecutors said that the engineer, Ronald J. Hoffman, 51, was also under investigation for exporting or agreeing to export similar data to at least four Japanese industrial firms over the last four years.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Justice Department political appointee with a high security clearance was investigated last year for possibly disclosing classified information to the government of South Africa, government sources said Thursday. The official, Roger Pilon, a Ronald Reagan appointee who headed the Office of Asylum Policy and Review, subsequently resigned, but the circumstances of his departure are now the subject of dispute.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A British woman who fled from an outlawed guerrilla group last year was actually a South African police officer assigned to spy on the anti-apartheid movement, the government said Friday. Olivia Forsyth, 28, was held captive by the African National Congress for 22 months before she fled in May to the British Embassy in Luanda, Angola. She holed up in the embassy for six months before returning here.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
A former civilian operations analyst at the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland pleaded guilty Tuesday to spying for South Africa in the first espionage case involving that country to be prosecuted in the United States. In the plea in federal court in Baltimore, Thomas Joseph Dolce, 49, admitted providing a South African military attache with classified ballistic research information. The espionage case was the second uncovered at the Aberdeen facility this year. Other Alleged Spying U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
A former aerospace research firm executive was indicted Thursday in Los Angeles on charges he allegedly exported sensitive information on the "Star Wars" weapons system to Japan. The federal grand jury indictment charges Ronald Hoffman, 51, of Los Angeles, with illegally exporting technical data relating to arms, ammunition and implements of war and lying on export control documents.
NEWS
March 17, 1987
An Agoura man pleaded guilty in Los Angeles federal court to charges of attempting to export aircraft technical manuals to South Africa without a license, in violation of the Arms Export Control Act. Edward James Bush, 51, a Canadian national, admitted that he attempted to export the manuals at the direction of George Posey, manager of Newport Aeronautical in Costa Mesa, who is also under indictment in the case. Assistant U.S. Atty.
NEWS
November 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A 27-year-old white woman who infiltrated the African National Congress for her native South Africa was sentenced Friday to 25 years in prison on spy charges. Odile Harington, an arts graduate and daughter of a Johannesburg doctor, bit her lip but showed no other emotion when sentenced. "The most appropriate sentence in a case such as this is in my view the death penalty," said High Court Judge Wilson Sandura. The judge refused to allow her to appeal the sentence, the maximum under Zimbabwe law.
NEWS
March 17, 1987
An Agoura man pleaded guilty in Los Angeles federal court to charges of attempting to export aircraft technical manuals to South Africa without a license, in violation of the Arms Export Control Act. Edward James Bush, 51, a Canadian national, admitted that he attempted to export the manuals at the direction of George Posey, manager of Newport Aeronautical in Costa Mesa, who is also under indictment in the case. Assistant U.S. Atty.
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