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Espionage Taiwan

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NEWS
July 20, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A glimpse at the background of Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie reveals that the Taiwanese immigrant worked at his Chinese restaurant in Little Rock, Ark., before opening a small consulting office in Beijing in late 1992 when his friend of 13 years, Bill Clinton, was elected president. But his resume became much grander after a major make-over by the Clinton administration's Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.
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NEWS
July 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trials have begun in China for an American citizen and a permanent U.S. resident on charges that they spied for Taiwan, the State Department said Thursday. The two are among a string of U.S. passport holders who have been detained by China during the past year, prompting calls by members of Congress for punitive action against Beijing. But the trials come at a time when the United States and China are talking publicly about an improvement in relations. Officials said Secretary of State Colin L.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An internal memorandum at Hughes Aircraft earlier this year, warning scientists of Korean and Chinese descent to be careful about Asian espionage efforts, has set off a fiery controversy among Asian-Americans who say the document was a racial insult. Hughes Aircraft officials acknowledged Monday that the unusual memo, written by a mid-level executive at the firm's telecommunications and space unit in El Segundo, contained an "unfortunate choice of words."
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000 | Bloomberg News
A Taiwanese executive who paid an Avery Dennison Corp. employee to pilfer corporate secrets from the U.S. adhesives maker was sentenced to six months of home detention in the first case tried under a U.S. law aimed at combating trade-secret theft. A federal judge in Youngstown, Ohio, sentenced P.Y. Yang, chief executive of Taiwan-based Four Pillars Ltd., to two years of probation along with home detention for violating the U.S. Economic Espionage Act.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trials have begun in China for an American citizen and a permanent U.S. resident on charges that they spied for Taiwan, the State Department said Thursday. The two are among a string of U.S. passport holders who have been detained by China during the past year, prompting calls by members of Congress for punitive action against Beijing. But the trials come at a time when the United States and China are talking publicly about an improvement in relations. Officials said Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Beijing court convicted four Taiwanese businessmen of spying. One of the men, Kou Chien-ming, was sentenced to four years in prison, while the other three were not punished, the official New China News Agency reported. Kou immediately appealed the verdict, Taiwan's Central News Agency said. The Taiwanese report said the other three men would not be free to return to Taiwan until a confirmation of the verdict was issued.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000 | Bloomberg News
A Taiwanese executive who paid an Avery Dennison Corp. employee to pilfer corporate secrets from the U.S. adhesives maker was sentenced to six months of home detention in the first case tried under a U.S. law aimed at combating trade-secret theft. A federal judge in Youngstown, Ohio, sentenced P.Y. Yang, chief executive of Taiwan-based Four Pillars Ltd., to two years of probation along with home detention for violating the U.S. Economic Espionage Act.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Beijing court convicted four Taiwanese businessmen of spying. One of the men, Kou Chien-ming, was sentenced to four years in prison, while the other three were not punished, the official New China News Agency reported. Kou immediately appealed the verdict, Taiwan's Central News Agency said. The Taiwanese report said the other three men would not be free to return to Taiwan until a confirmation of the verdict was issued.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A glimpse at the background of Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie reveals that the Taiwanese immigrant worked at his Chinese restaurant in Little Rock, Ark., before opening a small consulting office in Beijing in late 1992 when his friend of 13 years, Bill Clinton, was elected president. But his resume became much grander after a major make-over by the Clinton administration's Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An internal memorandum at Hughes Aircraft earlier this year, warning scientists of Korean and Chinese descent to be careful about Asian espionage efforts, has set off a fiery controversy among Asian-Americans who say the document was a racial insult. Hughes Aircraft officials acknowledged Monday that the unusual memo, written by a mid-level executive at the firm's telecommunications and space unit in El Segundo, contained an "unfortunate choice of words."
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