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Espionage United States

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March 10, 1991 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aline Romanones is staring her interviewer straight in the kisser and saying she's not at all sure the other woman is not a spy. "As I say," Romanones says with deadly sweetness, between dainty bites of berries and cream, "you could perfectly well be a top agent. You'd be a very good one, because your career enables you to write and ask people questions that other people couldn't ask." Though it is only lunchtime at the Polo Lounge, she's glittering with rubies, diamonds and emeralds.
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NEWS
March 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
The prime minister of Yugoslavia's dominant republic will sever all cooperation with Yugoslavia's president for not firing a general involved in an alleged U.S. spying affair, a senior official said Saturday. The comments by Serbian Justice Minister Vladan Batic represent a further escalation in the rivalries between Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic and Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica.
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NEWS
December 30, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A spy is a fabulist, a spinner of false tales, a maker of unreal worlds. A spy is a seducer of reckless hearts and broken souls, and a voyeur of the carnage left behind. A spy is not true. But Gennadiy Vasilenko and Jack Platt never lived strictly by the rules of their profession. Platt, of the CIA, and Vasilenko, of the KGB, were assigned to corrupt each other. Instead, they reached across the minefield of Cold War espionage to forge an extraordinary friendship.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
The military released Serbia's deputy prime minister Saturday, two days after detaining him on suspicion of spying for the United States, but said it still might charge him, fueling tensions between the Serbian leadership and army hard-liners left over from the era of Slobodan Milosevic. The incident on Thursday has angered Washington, which protested the treatment of an American diplomat who was arrested with Momcilo Perisic. Military agents snatched Perisic and the U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is intensifying its efforts to secure the return of Edward Lee Howard, a former CIA agent who defected to the Soviet Union in 1985 and fled to Sweden when the Communist empire collapsed, officials here indicated Wednesday. The move comes in the wake of a fresh decision by the Swedish immigration board that, in the opinion of U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was portrayed as a minor incident, a mere embarrassment to the intelligence community: Five Americans--four of them CIA officers--were accused by France in February of conducting an economic espionage operation against the government in Paris. The French--U.S. allies, after all--expressed outrage. The U.S. ambassador to Paris, Pamela Harriman, summoned by the French to receive an official protest, privately fumed as well. The affair briefly made headlines, then faded. But now, U.S.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A troubled former CIA officer from the agency's top secret "black bag" unit that breaks into foreign embassies to steal code books was charged with espionage Friday for tipping off two countries about the CIA's success in compromising their communications. Douglas F. Groat, 50, who after a 16-year career was fired in 1996 from the CIA's Science and Technology Directorate, was indicted Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington and could face the death penalty, prosecutors said.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His slate-gray eyes and granite face give Viktor Cherkashin the drained, slightly menacing look of a long Russian winter. When he speaks, it is in controlled bursts that never seem to betray him. He projects the intimidating aura of a man who would feel at home in a Las Vegas casino, running the cards. In fact, Viktor Cherkashin spent his life playing a game with infinitely higher stakes. He was a spy--an exceptionally good one.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The television film showed people identified as "diplomats from the United States" wandering in woods outside Havana, looking suspicious. They picked up bags and briefcases, made marks on benches and dropped off some sort of electronic gear. It appeared that they had no idea they were being watched--but they were on "Candid Camera," Cuban-style. The television show was the first of a nationally broadcast, six-part series aimed at detailing alleged spying by the CIA in Cuba.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir Galkin, a white-haired, chain-smoking former KGB spy, stepped off an airplane at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Oct. 29, 1996--and right into a nasty little diplomatic crisis that briefly and absurdly threatened to revive the spy-versus-spy rivalries of the Cold War.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shivering in the dark outside his uncle's mud house, Nazak punched a number into a $1,500 telephone, angled the phone's antenna south toward a communications satellite over the Indian Ocean, and pressed "OK." "Salaam aleikum," rumbled a voice on the other end. "Peace be with you." "Salaam aleikum," the skinny, fine-featured 22-year-old replied in the Afghan style. "I have some coordinates." "Go ahead," the voice said.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About a month before President Bush is to make his first state visit to China, reports have surfaced that the U.S.-made presidential plane for Chinese President Jiang Zemin has been found to be bugged with at least 20 listening devices. The Financial Times and the Washington Post reported today that the newly outfitted Boeing 767 was planted with tiny bugging devices, including one bug embedded in the headboard of the presidential bed on board the aircraft, according to unidentified sources.
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department, as part of an overall review of its counter-terrorism measures, is considering relaxing long-standing guidelines that had prohibited the FBI from spying on religious and political groups in the United States, federal officials said Friday night. While officials stressed that no final decision has been made, they said U.S. Atty. Gen.
NEWS
November 6, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who died over the weekend and was labeled an American spy by the Taliban lived for more than five months in this southwestern Pakistani city during the past year, according to the manager of a small hotel here. The man, who went by the Pakistani name Mazhar Ayub Khan, was arrested last week in Spin Buldak, an Afghan border town about 60 miles northwest of here, according to the Taliban.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq has accused five U.N. officials of spying for the United States and ordered them expelled from the country. The United Nations said Wednesday that Iraq had failed to substantiate its claim that the officials of the humanitarian "oil-for-food" program were "jeopardizing the security and the integrity of Iraq." But U.N. security officials decided Tuesday to withdraw the staff members to ensure their safety. The five U.N. officials--four Nigerians and a Bosnian--were overseeing a U.N.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Tobin Jr., the American Fulbright scholar imprisoned in Russia on drug charges, returned to the United States looking thin and tired after his seven-month ordeal. Tobin, 24, arrived at John F. Kennedy International Airport with his father, John Tobin, and Rep. James H. Maloney (D-Conn.). The younger Tobin, of Ridgefield, Conn., moved to the Russian city of Voronezh last fall to study popular attitudes amid the country's post-Soviet decline. Russian officials also accused Tobin of spying.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The leader of Iran's radical faction said some of the foreigners held hostage in Lebanon are spies, and he argued against releasing any of what he called "mercenary U.S. hostages." The comments by Ali Akbar Mohtashemi, a former interior minister who opposes President Hashemi Rafsanjani's overtures to the West, appeared in a signed editorial in a Tehran daily. Mohtashemi also argued that other Muslim nations have no business aiding Western nations in efforts to free the hostages.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bad blood between American diplomats and spies in the Balkans grew into a secret but nasty turf war this year in which the State Department's diplomats tried--without success--to gain access to top-secret communications between the CIA and its field officers, according to senior Clinton administration officials. Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott and other senior State Department officials sought to force the CIA to agree to new rules that would give a U.S.
NEWS
August 4, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia freed American Fulbright scholar John Edward Tobin from prison Friday, six months after he was arrested on drug charges in the western city of Voronezh and accused of being a spy in training. After Tobin's arrest, Russian officials frequently charged that the 24-year-old political scientist's education--Russian lessons at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., and interrogation techniques at the Army Intelligence Center at Ft. Huachuca, Ariz.
NEWS
August 4, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Hong Kong's City University ruled Friday that a Chinese-born American scholar convicted of spying and deported from China late last month can retain his faculty position at the school. The decision will allow 44-year-old Li Shaomin to resume his work as an associate professor of marketing at the university.
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