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Espionage United States

NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
After eight months fighting spying charges in a Russian prison and a final 24 hours on the road, a tired but relieved Edmond Pope was back in his parents' home on Monday. "This is the best [Christmas] I have ever had," Pope said. With just half an hour of sleep after a 20-hour flight from Germany and a four-hour drive from Portland International Airport, Pope said he had spent all of Sunday night catching up with his wife, Cheri.
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NEWS
December 16, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an American businessman hunting technology in Russia, Ed Pope spent long days in hotel conference rooms listening to Russian researchers chat happily about their work--and their hopes for lucrative deals. Yet no matter how relaxed the exchange, there was always a chilling presence: a government security man, who neither identified himself nor spoke but took copious notes on all that transpired. "Nobody had to be told who he was," said Keith J. McClellan, one of Pope's business partners.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edmond D. Pope, the first American convicted of spying in post-Soviet Russia, flew to freedom Thursday after President Vladimir V. Putin granted a pardon on the first day possible under law, leaving Russian citizens to wonder: What was the case about anyway? Pope, a businessman and former U.S. naval intelligence officer from State College, Pa.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
Seeking to avoid a dispute with the United States, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin indicated Saturday that he will soon pardon U.S. businessman Edmond D. Pope, whose espionage trial and conviction brought protests from Washington. Putin said he could not ignore a recommendation by Russia's presidential clemency commission that Pope be freed.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russia's presidential clemency commission recommended Friday that President Vladimir V. Putin free ailing U.S. businessman Edmond D. Pope, and President Clinton spoke to the Russian leader by phone urging the American's release. Pope's 20-year sentence for espionage, and the eight months he spent in a Moscow jail leading up to this week's conviction, have cast a pall over U.S.-Russian relations as Putin is trying to revive Moscow's global influence.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials hinted Thursday that President Vladimir V. Putin may rapidly pardon and order the release of U.S. businessman Edmond D. Pope, who was convicted this week of spying and sentenced to 20 years in prison. Anatoly Pristavkin, chairman of the president's clemency commission, said Pope sent an appeal to Putin on Thursday, a day after his sentence was handed down. Putin immediately passed it to the commission, which plans to consider it today.
NEWS
November 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
The lawyer for an American accused of spying in Russia said Wednesday that the professor from whom Edmond D. Pope allegedly obtained technical data on a torpedo system has recanted his testimony. The court refused to immediately accept the claim. Pope, a businessman and former U.S. Navy officer, was arrested in April and is being tried behind closed doors in Moscow on charges of trying to buy classified plans for a high-speed Russian torpedo system.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian officials turned down a request by the wife of an American accused of spying in Russia to visit her husband for the second time in a week, and an appeal to meet with President Vladimir V. Putin went unanswered, a U.S. official said. "This case is disappointment after disappointment," said Rep. John E. Peterson (R-Pa.), the congressman of accused spy Edmond D. Pope. Pope, 54, a retired U.S.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American businessman Edmond D. Pope, in his first courtroom defense, proclaimed his innocence Monday and accused Russian investigators of deliberately excluding evidence that would clear him of spying charges. "It has become clear that there are very many inaccuracies, mistakes and instances of falsification and juggling of facts" in the prosecution case, said Pope's lawyer, Pavel Astakhov.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Opening the espionage trial against U.S. businessman Edmond Pope, a Moscow judge agreed to an independent medical examination to determine whether the American is healthy enough to remain in prison. Pope, 54, a retired Navy officer from State College, Pa., was arrested in April by Russia's Federal Security Service on charges that he tried to buy plans for a high-speed Russian torpedo. He faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.
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