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Espionage United States

NEWS
January 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. college librarian harmed China's national security by taking large batches of secret documents out of the country and has confessed, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Song Yongyi, who worked at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania and had planned to become a U.S. citizen last September, was on a summer trip to China to collect source material on the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. Police detained him and his wife in August but allowed her to return to the United States in November.
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NEWS
July 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 18 months of tentative overtures between Iran and the United States, prospects for rapprochement have been seriously endangered by the arrest of 13 Iranian Jews on charges of spying for Israel and the United States, according to U.S. officials. The arrests, which occurred several months ago but were not revealed publicly until last month, threaten to become a cause celebre of the magnitude of the Salman Rushdie case.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The head of Iran's judiciary said Friday that 13 Iranian Jews held on charges of spying for Israel and the United States could face the death penalty, the Islamic Republic News Agency reported. "The laws [in Iran] have their own prescriptions which at certain instances provide for the capital punishment of spies," the agency, monitored in Dubai, quoted the Ayatollah Mohammed Yazdi as telling thousands of worshipers attending Friday prayers at Tehran University. U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraq leveled a new charge of espionage at U.N.-sponsored personnel Thursday in an escalating controversy touched off by reports of intelligence-sharing between the Clinton administration and the U.N. commission established to destroy Baghdad's weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the U.S. State Department and the chief U.N. arms inspector for Iraq all denied Wednesday that U.N. weapons teams collected sensitive electronic intelligence for the Clinton administration designed to topple the government of Saddam Hussein. "We not only have no convincing evidence of these allegations, we have no evidence of any kind," said Fred Eckhard, Annan's spokesman. "Have we facilitated spying? Are we spies?
BUSINESS
November 19, 1998 | Reuters
A U.S. telephone technician who was arrested on spying charges in Russia last year has sued his employer, Qualcomm Inc., claiming the company was responsible for his arrest, his lawyer said. Richard Bliss, who still works at the San Diego-based wireless phone company, claims he was arrested as a direct result of the company's failing to secure the permits he needed to carry out his work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after he was arrested as a suspected spy in North Korea, a 73-year-old pastor from Lomita came home Monday, landing in the arms of his grandchildren and a family bound tighter by a struggle to see him released. The Rev. Kwang Duk Lee, who routinely travels to the famine-stricken country on humanitarian missions, was detained May 26 while trying to get financing for a soybean processing plant, his family said.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea, Iran, China, Russia and other countries are concealing ballistic missile programs from U.S. spy satellites by using enormous underground facilities to build and test the weapons, according to members of a bipartisan congressional commission. The elaborate underground construction is one factor contributing to what the panel described as the "erosion" of U.S. intelligence agencies' ability to monitor weapons proliferation.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | From the Washington Post
The CIA's human espionage capability has dwindled since the Cold War and needs to be rebuilt, in the view of the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. Using the recent confrontation with Iraq as an illustration, Rep. Porter J. Goss (R-Fla.), who once was a CIA case officer, criticized U.S. intelligence estimates on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's intentions to use chemical and biological weapons.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A troubled former CIA officer from the agency's top secret "black bag" unit that breaks into foreign embassies to steal code books was charged with espionage Friday for tipping off two countries about the CIA's success in compromising their communications. Douglas F. Groat, 50, who after a 16-year career was fired in 1996 from the CIA's Science and Technology Directorate, was indicted Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington and could face the death penalty, prosecutors said.
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