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Espionage United States

NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Russian authorities said they have charged a former U.S. Navy officer with espionage after holding him in a Moscow prison for more than a week, saying he had tried to obtain military secrets. The U.S. Embassy has named the man as Edmond D. Pope, but Russia has refused to identify him or a Russian arrested as an alleged accomplice. A spokesman with the FSB, Russia's main intelligence agency, said the American faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.
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NEWS
April 13, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of America's top spymasters fervently denied Wednesday accusations that they illegally snoop on U.S. citizens at home and abroad by secretly reading e-mail, tapping cellular phones or even listening to baby monitors. In a scene sometimes reminiscent of the spy scandals of the 1970s, when congressional hearings exposed flagrant abuses by U.S. intelligence services, the House Intelligence Committee grilled George J. Tenet, who heads the CIA, and Lt. Gen. Michael V.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. businessman arrested this week in Moscow on suspicion of espionage was identified Friday as a former naval intelligence officer who retired from the service six years ago as a captain. The FSB, the main successor agency to the Soviet-era KGB, has accused the American, Edmond D. Pope, of purchasing information on defense technology from Russian scientists.
NEWS
April 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly all Korean agents sent behind enemy lines by the CIA during the Korean War were either killed or doubled as spies for the Communists, causing the agency to conclude that its use of American-trained loyalists was "morally reprehensible," according to declassified records. The judgment is significant not only for the internal conflicts it exposes but also because the CIA has never publicly acknowledged the scope or outcome of its covert operations during the war.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a rare reversal, Beijing's High Court has overturned the conviction of a Stanford University researcher sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment for allegedly leaking Chinese state secrets, a human rights group reported Monday. The announcement came as China is trying both to head off a U.S.-backed censure vote from the U.N. Human Rights Commission and to win permanent low-tariff access to U.S. markets.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Is there any privacy left in the Internet Age? Not according to some Europeans, who fear that the U.S. government regularly eavesdrops on their phone calls, reads their e-mail, checks their pagers and scans their faxes. The suspected snoops mostly work for America's largest and perhaps most secretive spy service, the National Security Agency. Responsible for providing U.S.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. college librarian harmed China's national security by taking large batches of secret documents out of the country and has confessed, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Song Yongyi, who worked at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania and had planned to become a U.S. citizen last September, was on a summer trip to China to collect source material on the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. Police detained him and his wife in August but allowed her to return to the United States in November.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 18 months of tentative overtures between Iran and the United States, prospects for rapprochement have been seriously endangered by the arrest of 13 Iranian Jews on charges of spying for Israel and the United States, according to U.S. officials. The arrests, which occurred several months ago but were not revealed publicly until last month, threaten to become a cause celebre of the magnitude of the Salman Rushdie case.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The head of Iran's judiciary said Friday that 13 Iranian Jews held on charges of spying for Israel and the United States could face the death penalty, the Islamic Republic News Agency reported. "The laws [in Iran] have their own prescriptions which at certain instances provide for the capital punishment of spies," the agency, monitored in Dubai, quoted the Ayatollah Mohammed Yazdi as telling thousands of worshipers attending Friday prayers at Tehran University. U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraq leveled a new charge of espionage at U.N.-sponsored personnel Thursday in an escalating controversy touched off by reports of intelligence-sharing between the Clinton administration and the U.N. commission established to destroy Baghdad's weapons of mass destruction.
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