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December 19, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Pitts had one choice and no choice, really. Her country? Or her husband? As an FBI support clerk, she became suspicious that her husband, Earl Edwin Pitts, a career supervisory agent with the bureau, might be compromising the security of the United States. She found a letter he had left in their rural Virginia home that, FBI investigators said, indicated her husband might be giving U.S. secrets to the Russians for cash.
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever arrested on spying charges went on trial in Tampa, with a prosecutor saying the defendant was once No. 1 on the Kremlin's list of intelligence sources during the Cold War. In Army Reserve Col. George Trofimoff's espionage trial, federal prosecutor Walter Furr said Trofimoff, 74, delivered documents to the KGB over 25 years. The information he is accused of providing includes details on U.S. battle plans and briefs of chemical and biological
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NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It stands in red brick off Tchaikovsky Street, a mute monument to American hubris, Soviet treachery or both. At this juncture in superpower relations, it is a sore point that both countries probably would rather forget. Don't look for the new U.S. Embassy building to be among the highlights of President Bush's Moscow visit--although he ultimately must decide what to do about it, and White House officials say the matter will be raised with the Soviets.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sipping tea out of a Che Guevara mug, tending her suburban garden and admitting to having spied for the Soviet Union for nearly four decades, 87-year-old Melita Norwood has enraged and baffled Britain while calmly waiting to see if she will be prosecuted for treachery. The great-grandmother, who passed nuclear weapon secrets to Moscow, has been depicted as England's equivalent of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, the Americans who were convicted of trying to pass U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His slate-gray eyes and granite face give Viktor Cherkashin the drained, slightly menacing look of a long Russian winter. When he speaks, it is in controlled bursts that never seem to betray him. He projects the intimidating aura of a man who would feel at home in a Las Vegas casino, running the cards. In fact, Viktor Cherkashin spent his life playing a game with infinitely higher stakes. He was a spy--an exceptionally good one.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard W. Miller, the first FBI agent ever accused of espionage, was found guilty Tuesday of passing secret documents to the Soviet Union in exchange for a promised $65,000 in gold and cash. As in his previous two trials, Miller was portrayed as a bumbling agent who had a sexual affair and espionage misadventures with an alcoholic Soviet spy, Svetlana Ogorodnikova, who, the prosecution charged, lured Miller into betraying his profession and his country.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
It was to be a super-sensitive inspection tour of the new U.S. Embassy under construction in Moscow. But how to keep some discussions during the visit hush-hush? Well, there's always Magic Slates. Magic Slates? For 64 years, kids have used these toys to send secret messages back and forth. When mom or dad walks in the room, just lift up the translucent page and the message disappears. So why not use it to thwart the Russians.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Ogorodnikov is a man without a country, and that suits him just fine. But it is creating a legal dilemma for the United States, which is unable to ship the convicted Soviet spy back home because his country no longer exists. Adding to the predicament, Ogorodnikov is risking a second criminal prosecution in the United States for refusing to ask any other country to accept him. A 1952 law says he must cooperate in his own deportation or face 10 years in prison.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
James H. Geer, who has headed the FBI's intelligence division during a four-year span in which some of the bureau's most noted espionage cases were developed, is retiring, an FBI spokesman said Tuesday. Geer, 50, is a 25-year bureau veteran, and his decision to end his FBI career "comes as no surprise," said Milt Ahlerich, assistant FBI director for public affairs.
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A retired Army intelligence analyst was charged Tuesday with selling the Soviet KGB top secret documents from 1988 to 1991, including sites targeted for tactical nuclear attack if the former Soviet Union struck the United States first. David Sheldon Boone, 46, who was assigned to the National Security Agency, allegedly walked into the Soviet embassy here and volunteered his services to Moscow, delivering his first classified document for $300.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A former intelligence analyst with a supersecret Pentagon agency was indicted on charges he was a spy for the Soviet KGB. A grand jury in Alexandria, Va., alleged that David Sheldon Boone, analyst for the National Security Agency, spied for the Soviet security and espionage agency in the late 1980s, then fell prey this year to an FBI sting operation. The department said the Soviets paid Boone $60,000 for a variety of top-secret documents. Boone was arrested last month at a Virginia hotel.
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A retired Army intelligence analyst was charged Tuesday with selling the Soviet KGB top secret documents from 1988 to 1991, including sites targeted for tactical nuclear attack if the former Soviet Union struck the United States first. David Sheldon Boone, 46, who was assigned to the National Security Agency, allegedly walked into the Soviet embassy here and volunteered his services to Moscow, delivering his first classified document for $300.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Nine letters written by Albert Einstein reveal that the father of modern physics had a love affair during World War II with a purported Soviet spy, Sotheby's auction house said. It said the letters, to be sold at an auction in New York on June 26, were written by Einstein to Russian emigre Margarita Konenkova. He wrote to her in the Soviet Union from his home in Princeton, N.J., during the post-war period between November 1945 and July 1946.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the catacombs of Moscow's Dynamo Stadium, in a small office that is dimly lit and eerily quiet, former KGB officers still come to pay their respects to the Soviet Union's last spymaster. Leonid Shebarshin's business card now reads, "Russian National Economic Security Service," a private security firm through which he is trying to make his way in the new crime-anxious Russia.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Soviet diplomat Vladimir Markarov began spying for the United States in 1976, the Cold War was in full fury, the Central Intelligence Agency was eager to recruit every Soviet official it could lay its hands on, and the KGB was just as determined to stop the Americans from luring errant diplomats. If Markarov had been exposed at that time, his story would almost certainly have ended badly, with either a lengthy stay in the KGB's Lefortovo prison or a bullet in the head.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In August 1990, an urgent message was delivered to a senior CIA official from Sergei Papushin, a former KGB major who had defected to the United States. The Soviets have one of your people, Papushin warned. The CIA's Moscow station has been penetrated by a KGB mole. And then a very strange thing happened to Sergei Papushin. He was found dead in a CIA apartment in Maryland, his body lying underneath his bed and an empty fifth of bourbon by his side.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Saturday expelled six French citizens--four diplomats and two business executives--in retaliation for the expulsion of three Soviet diplomats from France last Thursday. An announcement on Soviet television said the six were ordered out for "activities incompatible with their status," the diplomatic euphemism for spying charges.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
The FBI's extraordinary semi-public espionage investigation of Felix S. Bloch has gone before a grand jury, sources familiar with the case said Friday, but that does not mean the government is any closer to seeking an indictment of the U.S. diplomat.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His slate-gray eyes and granite face give Viktor Cherkashin the drained, slightly menacing look of a long Russian winter. When he speaks, it is in controlled bursts that never seem to betray him. He projects the intimidating aura of a man who would feel at home in a Las Vegas casino, running the cards. In fact, Viktor Cherkashin spent his life playing a game with infinitely higher stakes. He was a spy--an exceptionally good one.
NEWS
June 30, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former FBI agent Earl Pitts says anger as well as money led him to betray his country, and he is offering to be a "guinea pig" for studying what causes people to do such a thing, a published report said. Newsweek magazine, in editions on sale today, reported on interviews with Pitts' psychiatrist, David Charney, who interviewed the former agent in prison. Pitts was sentenced to 27 years in prison.
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