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Essential Oils

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HEALTH
January 24, 2014 | By Alene Dawson
In this hyper-fast, crazy-overscheduled, stress-inducing, 24/7 plugged-in reality, baths seem indulgent, even quaint, conjuring images of 19th century paintings of women with their hair swirled high atop their heads in old-timey tubs pouring pails of heated water about them. But a bath may be just what the doctor ordered. "America is a fast-moving society. We have fewer holidays and vacation time than, for example, Europe, and because of technology we're always on the clock," says Ole Henriksen, owner of the eponymous skin care line and West Hollywood spa where he incorporates Japanese bathing rituals.
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HEALTH
January 24, 2014 | By Alene Dawson
In this hyper-fast, crazy-overscheduled, stress-inducing, 24/7 plugged-in reality, baths seem indulgent, even quaint, conjuring images of 19th century paintings of women with their hair swirled high atop their heads in old-timey tubs pouring pails of heated water about them. But a bath may be just what the doctor ordered. "America is a fast-moving society. We have fewer holidays and vacation time than, for example, Europe, and because of technology we're always on the clock," says Ole Henriksen, owner of the eponymous skin care line and West Hollywood spa where he incorporates Japanese bathing rituals.
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NEWS
June 24, 1998 | LILLIAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although barely detectable by the average nose, fragrance fills the air of most shopping malls. Retailers want consumers to stay a little longer and buy a little more. Some real-estate agents supply home sellers with cinnamon rolls to pop into the oven moments before an open house. Smell sells. And it does more.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003
Nelson Handel obviously conducted his research with a preconceived notion of what aromatherapy is and is not ("The Sweet Smell of Excess," June 15). Any product that has synthetic chemical constituents such as Palmolive does is not aromatherapy. If Handel wants true scientific findings, have him attend the 34th International Symposium on Essential Oils in the fall, where scientists and researchers from around the world will study and prove the healing effects of essential oils. Most essential oils are antibiotic, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory.
HOME & GARDEN
November 11, 1995 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS
* Essential oils: Derived exclusively from the leaves, blooms and stems of herbs and flowers, essential oils are the purest form of the very essence of herbs and are not diluted with any other additives. * Poultice: A spread made from dried herbs spread on an affected area to soothe, treat or help disinfect. * Infusions: Herbs steeped like teas, incorporating leaves, stems and flowers. Consumed orally, they are often enhanced with honey or lemon and can be consumed hot or cold.
NEWS
April 20, 1995
L ola Clark of San Clemente specializes in Western "herbalism." To create her natural skin-care products, Lola Earthworks, she uses plants that grow abundantly here--eucalyptus, elder, dandelion, yellow dock, fennel and yarrow, "just to name a few, as I look out my window," she says. "I also grow over 100 herbs." She offers seminars on natural cosmetics at Of the Earth, a health-oriented general store in San Juan Capistrano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1995
Bug off--While insects offer many benefits to our environment, such as providing nourishment for wildlife and pollinating plants, it's no fun battling them on the home front. Chemical repellents may cause allergic reactions, can poison pets or children and often kill entire populations of insects rather than targeting a type. Certain essential oils and herbs have natural insect-repelling properties.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003
Nelson Handel obviously conducted his research with a preconceived notion of what aromatherapy is and is not ("The Sweet Smell of Excess," June 15). Any product that has synthetic chemical constituents such as Palmolive does is not aromatherapy. If Handel wants true scientific findings, have him attend the 34th International Symposium on Essential Oils in the fall, where scientists and researchers from around the world will study and prove the healing effects of essential oils. Most essential oils are antibiotic, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each night before she goes to bed, top-ranked triathlete Colleen Cannon sets up the smelliest part of her training regimen. She places a potpourri diffuser by her bedside--an electrical device that heats water and fragrance--and adds 10 drops of "essential oils" (oils distilled from flowers, bark, roots and other plant life).
BUSINESS
February 5, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Rocca-Lundstrom dips her head toward the candle dubbed Meditation and takes a sniff. The label says it contains patchouli and ylang-ylang, pure essential oils. True enough, but Rocca-Lundstrom, with her trained chemist's nose, also picks up a hint of synthetic perfume. "None of this is real," she said. "None of it." Controversy is intruding into the mellow, lavender-scented world of aromatherapy, the quasi-science of smells that purportedly enhance health, mood and brain function.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003 | Nelson Handel, Nelson Handel is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles.
I lie face down on a massage table. Below, accessible to my nose through the table's face hole, is a cloth saturated in aromatic oil. The smell is overwhelming. Acupuncture needles protrude from, among other places, the top of my head. Piano music plays. I'm sweating slightly and have a mild case of the spins. I'm in this generic-looking Westside medical office to relieve the throbbing pain in my lower back.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2001 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Can a whiff of the right fragrance keep you energized during a tedious drive, rejuvenate you after a long flight, coax sleep when you need it and ease travel-related stress? Advocates of aromatherapy--which uses fragrances derived from essential oils or extracts of flowers, fruits and other natural substances for a desired effect--claim it can, even though scientific research has produced mixed findings.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Rocca-Lundstrom dips her head toward the candle dubbed Meditation and takes a sniff. The label says it contains patchouli and ylang-ylang, pure essential oils. True enough, but Rocca-Lundstrom, with her trained chemist's nose, also picks up a hint of synthetic perfume. "None of this is real," she said. "None of it." Controversy is intruding into the mellow, lavender-scented world of aromatherapy, the quasi-science of smells that purportedly enhance health, mood and brain function.
NEWS
June 24, 1998 | LILLIAN REITER
Aromatherapists advise using only natural essential oils, not the synthetic or diluted variety. One way to determine the purity of an oil is to place a drop on a piece of paper. If it leaves a mark after it dries, it is a synthetic oil. Price is also an indication. Pure rose and jasmine oils usually sell for more than $50 per one-quarter ounce. For more information about aromatherapy, here's a sampling of sources: * National Assn.
NEWS
June 24, 1998 | LILLIAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although barely detectable by the average nose, fragrance fills the air of most shopping malls. Retailers want consumers to stay a little longer and buy a little more. Some real-estate agents supply home sellers with cinnamon rolls to pop into the oven moments before an open house. Smell sells. And it does more.
HOME & GARDEN
November 11, 1995 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS
* Essential oils: Derived exclusively from the leaves, blooms and stems of herbs and flowers, essential oils are the purest form of the very essence of herbs and are not diluted with any other additives. * Poultice: A spread made from dried herbs spread on an affected area to soothe, treat or help disinfect. * Infusions: Herbs steeped like teas, incorporating leaves, stems and flowers. Consumed orally, they are often enhanced with honey or lemon and can be consumed hot or cold.
MAGAZINE
March 25, 1990 | BARBARA FOLEY
THERE ARE SOME scents that make good sense. On busy La Cienega Boulevard in West Hollywood, Linda Kammins aromatherapy salon hardly appears to be the unique haven it is. Tucked away on the second floor of a modern pod mall, it looks like just another storefront, just another beauty salon. But it isn't. "Aromatherapy is an ancient tradition, a ritual in which essential oils are used for healing," Kammins says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1995
Bug off--While insects offer many benefits to our environment, such as providing nourishment for wildlife and pollinating plants, it's no fun battling them on the home front. Chemical repellents may cause allergic reactions, can poison pets or children and often kill entire populations of insects rather than targeting a type. Certain essential oils and herbs have natural insect-repelling properties.
NEWS
April 20, 1995
L ola Clark of San Clemente specializes in Western "herbalism." To create her natural skin-care products, Lola Earthworks, she uses plants that grow abundantly here--eucalyptus, elder, dandelion, yellow dock, fennel and yarrow, "just to name a few, as I look out my window," she says. "I also grow over 100 herbs." She offers seminars on natural cosmetics at Of the Earth, a health-oriented general store in San Juan Capistrano.
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