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Esteban De Jesus

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SPORTS
May 13, 1989 | Associated Press
Esteban DeJesus, an outstanding lightweight who fought in the shadow of Roberto Duran during the 1970s, is dead at 37. DeJesus, a former champion, died Thursday after being hospitalized since March. De Jesus, who had publicly admitted he was a drug addict, contracted AIDS during the early 1980s while serving a life sentence in the Rio Piedras State Penitentiary for the fatal shooting of a teen-ager in 1981. He died less than two months after Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon commuted his sentence when it was disclosed that the ex-champion had AIDS.
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SPORTS
May 12, 1989 | BETSY BALSLEY, From Associated Press and Times Food Editor
Esteban de Jesus, former World Boxing Council lightweight champion who fought in the shadow of Roberto Duran during the 1970s, has died of complications of AIDS less than two months after being released from prison for humanitarian reasons. He was 37. De Jesus died Thursday after being hospitalized since March. De Jesus, who had publicly admitted he was a drug addict, contracted AIDS during the early 1980s while serving a life sentence in the Rio Piedras State Penitentiary for the fatal shooting of a teen-ager in 1981.
SPORTS
May 12, 1989 | BETSY BALSLEY, From Associated Press and Times Food Editor
Esteban de Jesus, former World Boxing Council lightweight champion who fought in the shadow of Roberto Duran during the 1970s, has died of complications of AIDS less than two months after being released from prison for humanitarian reasons. He was 37. De Jesus died Thursday after being hospitalized since March. De Jesus, who had publicly admitted he was a drug addict, contracted AIDS during the early 1980s while serving a life sentence in the Rio Piedras State Penitentiary for the fatal shooting of a teen-ager in 1981.
SPORTS
May 13, 1989 | Associated Press
Esteban DeJesus, an outstanding lightweight who fought in the shadow of Roberto Duran during the 1970s, is dead at 37. DeJesus, a former champion, died Thursday after being hospitalized since March. De Jesus, who had publicly admitted he was a drug addict, contracted AIDS during the early 1980s while serving a life sentence in the Rio Piedras State Penitentiary for the fatal shooting of a teen-ager in 1981. He died less than two months after Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon commuted his sentence when it was disclosed that the ex-champion had AIDS.
SPORTS
November 3, 1996
Growth of AIDS in the U.S.
SPORTS
March 16, 1999
Nothing fascinated early 20th century sports-oriented Americans quite like speed. Speedy horses, speedy boats, speedy airplanes, speedy sprinters . . . and above all, men who drove speedy cars. The mere thought of a human being driving an automobile--or "machine," as many called them then--at 100 mph rested crazily on the mind, like too much champagne. The first superstar of motor sports was Barney Oldfield, whose feats were so amazing his name became part of the vernacular.
SPORTS
April 17, 1993 | WALLACE MATTHEWS, NEWSDAY
Ruben Palacio, a 30-year-old featherweight from Colombia, was told Friday that he was the first title-holding boxer to test positive for the virus that causes AIDS. Palacio, who was to defend his World Boxing Organization crown against England's John Davidson tonight, had taken a prefight blood test. Ed Levine, president of the fledgling WBO's championship committee, said the organization's only option was to bar Palacio from the ring.
SPORTS
March 22, 1994 | ALLAN MALAMUD
This March is so mad that a Pacific 10 Conference team might actually reach the Final Four. . . . The easiest way to Charlotte probably is through L.A., where Arizona is stationed in the West Regional. . . . The Wildcats have the best backcourt in the nation, Khalid Reeves and Damon Stoudamire, and a coach, Lute Olson, eager to show that he can be as successful in the postseason as in the regular season. . . . In 1988, Olson took Arizona to the Final Four, where it lost to Oklahoma.
SPORTS
February 11, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavyweight Tommy Morrison was informed Saturday by the Nevada State Athletic Commission that he tested positive for HIV, a source told The Times. Marc Ratner, executive director of the Nevada State Athletic Commission, would say only that Morrison had been "medically suspended" at 1 p.m. Saturday, about six hours before his scheduled 10-round fight against Arthur Weathers at the MGM Grand Hotel. "At this time, he [Morrison] is suspended around the world," Ratner said.
SPORTS
June 6, 1996 | ALLAN MALAMUD
At about 8:30 Friday night at Caesars Palace, ring announcer Michael Buffer will bellow, "Let's get ready to rumble!" . . . That is certain. . . . But then what? . . . Round 1--It is a feeling-out round between World Boxing Council super-lightweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez and unbeaten Oscar De La Hoya. In the last 30 seconds, Chavez throws a right hand that grazes De La Hoya's chin and brings a roar from the capacity crowd of 15,600. . . . Round 2--Chavez, the aggressor, steps up the pace.
SPORTS
June 24, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Sadly, by the end of the fourth round, you could see none of it was left. Not even a flicker. Lost, somewhere in time. The Roberto Duran you remembered from the 1970s, when he was arguably the greatest lightweight who ever lived, was now a sad, bleeding caricature of what he was. Now, he was struggling as a blown-up, 35-year-old middleweight against a very ordinary opponent, Robbie Sims, Marvin Hagler's half-brother.
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