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Estelle Van Meter

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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the telephone rings in Estelle Van Meter's living room, it could be her 79-year-old sister, who lives two blocks away. Or it could be LAPD Chief Darryl Gates, school board member Rita Walters, City Councilman Gilbert Lindsay, the principal of Fremont High or 66th Street Elementary School, a probation or Fire Department official, or the director of the senior citizen center she founded and which bears her name. Or it could be a child down the block who needs new shoes.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the telephone rings in Estelle Van Meter's living room, it could be her 79-year-old sister, who lives two blocks away. Or it could be LAPD Chief Darryl Gates, school board member Rita Walters, City Councilman Gilbert Lindsay, the principal of Fremont High or 66th Street Elementary School, a probation or Fire Department official, or the director of the senior citizen center she founded and which bears her name. Or it could be a child down the block who needs new shoes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992
Entertainer Barbra Streisand on Monday boosted to $102,500 the sum her personal foundation has donated to area charities working to develop long-term solutions for urban problems in Los Angeles. Grants totaling $52,500 were awarded Monday to the Urban League, the Asian Pacific American Dispute Resolution Center, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Southern California chapter, the Estelle Van Meter Multipurpose Center, Community Youth Gang Services, Drew Economic Development Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2003 | Li Fellers, Times Staff Writer
For many elderly residents in a slice of South Los Angeles, the Estelle Van Meter Multipurpose Center is the heart of their social lives -- where they can laugh and talk with friends, share meals and even learn how to square dance. "It's a home away from home," said Yvonne Ali, 73, who started coming to the center after open heart surgery three years ago left her depressed. But now this beloved center for senior citizens is in trouble.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
The Watts branch of California Federal Bank has donated $1,925 to four organizations that provide sports, recreation and other services for youths and senior citizens. The Watts Friendship Sports League, the Families for Families organization and the Explorer Program at the Los Angeles Police Department's Southeast station--all in Watts--each received $500. The Estelle Van Meter Multi-Purpose Center in South-Central received $425.
REAL ESTATE
December 5, 2004 | From Times staff and wire reports
Under a Los Angeles anti-predatory lending initiative unveiled last week, seniors, minorities and low-income homeowners who are in jeopardy of losing their homes because of unusually high-cost mortgages will get some assistance. Fannie Mae, an initiative partner, will provide $5 million in home mortgages to help 25 families refinance. Outreach programs will be available for seniors and other potential victims of so-called predatory loans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1992
Eight Los Angeles Police Department "community contact centers," built to improve ties between the police and the public, have opened in South-Central Los Angeles within the department's 77th Street Division. Residents in eight patrol areas can use the centers to meet police, report criminal matters and obtain advice on where to turn in order to solve non-police-related matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1994 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 300 volunteers turned out Sunday to clean beaches, paint T-shirts with runaway youths in Hollywood, deliver food to AIDS patients and join in other activities in what was billed as the first annual Christmas Day of good works by the Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles. Taking note of the youngish character of the crowd, composed of many singles and young people, Rabbi Harvey Fields said the outpouring "put the lie to those who say the 25-to-40s don't care about society."
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Forget about haystacks, barns, pickups and small-town folk hooting and hollering on a weekend night at the local square-dance in some backwater town. It's right here in the big city. On the first Friday of each month, a group of energetic senior citizens streams into a church or senior center in South-Central to kick up their heels, prance, promenade and send their partners a-twirlin' amid the twang of country music, the rhythm of clapping and the occasional yahoo!
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
To the beat of drums and beyond the craning necks of onlookers, Gloria Buzart became Harriet Tubman, recounting the life of the African-American heroine who led more than 300 slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad. More than just reciting an often-repeated story, she was keeping history alive by telling a story--carrying on the oral tradition. "I'm asking you to remember," Buzart said, "so that we can reclaim history, so that we can go on to mental and spiritual freedom."
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | RICH CONNELL and LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a jittery Los Angeles inches toward verdicts in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial, chilling and often wildly unsubstantiated rumors of impending violence are swirling through offices, shops and neighborhoods across the county. Law enforcement officials, political leaders and rumor control hot lines are struggling to douse the gossip as it leaps from place to place via alarming flyers and community and business grapevines.
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